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Fri Dec 28, 2012, 12:23 PM

Elizabeth Ware Packard

Elizabeth Ware Packard (28 December 1816 25 July 1897) ~ Teacher, author, and, after being committed to an asylum for 3 years on the orders of her husband (because she disagreed with his religious views) and then being imprisoned in her own home with windows and doors nailed shut by the same husband, advocate for women's rights and the mentally ill's rights.

Left penniless and without custody of her 6 children, Elizabeth wrote her memoirs of her unjust imprisonment which were quite popular and brought in an income that she used to campaign for the "Packard Laws" preventing husbands from being able to commit their wives to institutions without question. She also campaigned to change divorce laws so that ex-wives would no longer remain penniless and they could retain custody of their children.

http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/broughttolife/people/elizabethwarepackard.aspx


Happy birthday and thank you to this feminist woman and hero, who should never be forgotten.

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Reply Elizabeth Ware Packard (Original post)
redqueen Dec 2012 OP
ismnotwasm Dec 2012 #1
seabeyond Dec 2012 #4
niyad Dec 2012 #2
seabeyond Dec 2012 #3
ismnotwasm Dec 2012 #5

Response to redqueen (Original post)

Fri Dec 28, 2012, 01:02 PM

1. Can you imagine?

When people battle it starts with fear and pain, turns to anger and through the fire of healthy anger, protected by it, the ability to change things.

To get to this point in those days is incredible for a women in these circumstances. It'd be hard to do now. We owe the forgotten past so very much.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 12:48 PM

4. i think about this often. every time i read about a woman that spoke out in prior times.

absolutely.

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Response to redqueen (Original post)

Fri Dec 28, 2012, 01:42 PM

2. thank you for remembering her.

do you remember charlotte perkins gilman's story "the yellow wallpaper"? If I remember correctly, pbs did a version of it. I think people today have no idea how women who stepped even slightly out of conformity have been treated.

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Response to redqueen (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 12:47 PM

3. when we're told here on du sexism is'nt different be it toward men or women, this history is ignored

women have never had the power and control over men. a mere man. just a man. able to have this power over a woman. a human being. JUST like him. no better or worse.

but, this is why sexism toward men can NEVER be equated to the womens movement.

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Response to seabeyond (Reply #3)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 01:39 PM

5. The whole concept is ridiculous

Bullshit protesting so they don't loose privilege. But to be fair, there's very little awareness of privilege, so it's turned into a sense of fear leading to silly little power games.

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