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Fri Nov 9, 2012, 02:50 PM

Agnes Meyer Driscoll

Agnes Meyer Driscoll was a pioneer in the code making and breaking sciences and work for DoD groups that would later become the National Security Agency. She was an educated technical leader.

Ms. Driscoll's work as a navy cryptanalyst who broke a multitude of Japanese naval systems, as well as a developer of early machine systems, marks her as one of the true "originals" in American cryptology. She was born in 1889, and in 1911 she received an A.B. degree from Ohio State University, majoring in mathematics, physics, foreign languages, and music. From her earliest days as a college student, Agnes Meyer pursued technical and scientific studies atypical for a woman of the times. After graduation, she moved to Amarillo, Texas, where she was director of music at a military academy, and, later, chair of the mathematics department at the local high school.

In June 1918, about one year after America entered World War I, Agnes Meyer enlisted in the United States Navy. She was recruited at the highest possible rank of Chief Yeoman and was assigned to the Code and Signal section of the Director of Naval Communications. Except for a two-year hiatus, when she worked for a private firm, Agnes Meyer Driscoll (she married in 1924) would remain a leading cryptanalyst for the U.S. Navy until 1949.

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Arrow 10 replies Author Time Post
Reply Agnes Meyer Driscoll (Original post)
discntnt_irny_srcsm Nov 2012 OP
ismnotwasm Nov 2012 #1
discntnt_irny_srcsm Nov 2012 #3
MadrasT Nov 2012 #2
discntnt_irny_srcsm Nov 2012 #4
ismnotwasm Nov 2012 #5
discntnt_irny_srcsm Nov 2012 #6
discntnt_irny_srcsm Nov 2012 #7
ismnotwasm Nov 2012 #8
discntnt_irny_srcsm Nov 2012 #10
MadrasT Nov 2012 #9

Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Original post)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 12:37 AM

1. Awesome

Thank you

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #1)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 08:55 AM

3. You're welcome :) n/t

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Original post)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 08:53 AM

2. I love this. Thank you.

Whenever I hear about women like her who took paths that were so unusual in their time, I am always very curious about their lives.

Off to search for a biography....

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Response to MadrasT (Reply #2)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 09:01 AM

4. Then you may also be interested in...

...Zitkala Sha, a Native American.

Also, you may be interested in NWHP: http://www.nwhp.org/whm/index.php

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #4)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 09:24 AM

5. Women in technology is an incredible theme.

While women have always been around, their contributions are largely unknown or ignored. When women had to fight for education, they were fighting several fronts, one of them being the conviction women are naturally or later genetically 'not as good as men' in these areas. ( I still remember a nephrologist I work with being furious at Larry Summers suggestion to the effect that women weren't 'as good as men' in areas as mathematics. Although largely defended in the media as being misunderstood, it was, at best poorly said) The sciences are still overwhelmingly male and the whys of that is sadly interesting in itself.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #5)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 09:48 AM

6. Two somewhat recent women...

...that I can think of are Mary L. Boas primarily an author. I used her book as an undergrad. Also, Maria Goeppert Mayer; I read some information derived from her work. She was the 1963 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physics.

Personally, I prefer reading about people from history in non-technical areas.

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #5)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 03:20 PM

7. It may just be an urban legend but...

...I think one of the things that attracted Einstein to Mileva Marić is that her grades were better than his.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mileva_Mari%C4%87

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #7)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 11:57 PM

8. Heh

Can you imagine having a mind like Einstein's? He thought in pictures, he imagined what the universe actually looks like. She may have understood him, although probably not the theory, because its hard to understand for anybody, but she didn't have to like him. I have book of writings from Einstein ( no math) I should see he says anything about relationships

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #8)

Sun Nov 11, 2012, 08:57 AM

10. He was a smart guy

Some of my favorite quotes from him:

"It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge."

"It is strange to be known so universally and yet to be so lonely."

"Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom."

"Any man who can drive safely while kissing a pretty girl is simply not giving the kiss the attention it deserves."

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Response to ismnotwasm (Reply #5)

Sun Nov 11, 2012, 12:46 AM

9. Grace Hopper and Ada Lovelace are among my tech-women heroes.



I was a professional tech geek for almost 20 years until I burned out on working with machines.

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