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Wed Apr 4, 2012, 08:40 PM

Poll: Evangelicals May Double Their Support for Obama in 2012 Election

In the 2012 presidential election, President Barack Obama could double the amount of support he got from evangelicals in the 2008 election, according to Barna Group, a Christian polling organization.

In 2008, Obama received the support of about 11 percent of evangelicals, according to Barna Group. In a March 14-21 Barna Group poll of 647 likely voters, twice as many evangelicals, 22 percent, said they were prepared to vote for Obama.


http://www.christianpost.com/news/poll-evangelicals-may-double-their-support-for-obama-in-2012-election-72657/

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Arrow 33 replies Author Time Post
Reply Poll: Evangelicals May Double Their Support for Obama in 2012 Election (Original post)
Drunken Irishman Apr 2012 OP
RKP5637 Apr 2012 #1
Jackpine Radical Apr 2012 #10
RKP5637 Apr 2012 #14
Hippo_Tron Apr 2012 #16
YoungDemCA Apr 2012 #28
YoungDemCA Apr 2012 #30
RKP5637 Apr 2012 #31
rufus dog Apr 2012 #2
provis99 Apr 2012 #3
customerserviceguy Apr 2012 #4
RyanPsych Apr 2012 #12
Hippo_Tron Apr 2012 #17
Tarheel_Dem Apr 2012 #5
annabanana Apr 2012 #6
bluestateguy Apr 2012 #7
Tom Ripley Apr 2012 #22
Bluenorthwest Apr 2012 #8
yortsed snacilbuper Apr 2012 #9
Gore1FL Apr 2012 #24
Jamaal510 Apr 2012 #11
denem Apr 2012 #13
saras Apr 2012 #15
cthulu2016 Apr 2012 #18
Gore1FL Apr 2012 #25
denem Apr 2012 #26
Gore1FL Apr 2012 #27
musicblind Apr 2012 #33
LetTimmySmoke Apr 2012 #19
alp227 Apr 2012 #20
drm604 Apr 2012 #21
jenmito Apr 2012 #23
YoungDemCA Apr 2012 #29
agentS Apr 2012 #32

Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 08:48 PM

1. I've always wondered why evangelicals are so anti-American and anti-Jesus. The

majority apparently embrace the evilness of the republican party. Just what is it they hate about America and Jesus ... They certainly do not subscribe to the teachings of Jesus and they warp most of what he ever said.

This is excellent that the percentages are increasing for Obama, but I'm baffled as to why it's not more in the 50% range.

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Response to RKP5637 (Reply #1)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 10:44 PM

10. Historically, evangelicals were often economic left-populists

and social/religious conservatives.

The classic example was William Jennings Bryan, who was both a fighter for the working man and the Biblical literalist who fought against Clarence Darrow in the Scopes trial.

Just not the kind of guy you'd think yourself likely to find in today's America. But they do exist. I know a number of them.

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Response to Jackpine Radical (Reply #10)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 11:27 PM

14. Thank you!!! n/t

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Response to Jackpine Radical (Reply #10)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 12:17 AM

16. They're becoming rarer and rarer

We tend to think of all non-rich people who don't vote Democratic as either misguided racists or religious fanatics who were all duped into switching to the Republicans.

Honestly I think for decades you've always had more than one group among the socially conservative non-rich voters. In particular, I think you have those socially conservatives who economically are getting by but not getting ahead and those who are not getting by period. The former group tend to be the ones who have switched over to the Republican Party. Sort of the Archie Bunker Republicans, if you will.

The latter group, I think, has just given up and stopped voting in large numbers, period. Among those who do, many still vote for Democrats. Fact is that when you are dirt poor, or you grew up dirt poor, you're just not that likely to be a Republican, even if you are white, pro-life, and go to Church every Sunday.

I was rather surprised when a good friend of mine who grew up poor and works for Democratic candidates told me that she thinks abortion should be illegal in all cases, even rape and incest. I asked her if it was the most important issue to her. She said not by a long shot. The most important issue to her was getting people back to work.

The Republican narrative works well with the Archie Bunker types, because they've been convinced that government is taking away money from bootstrappers like them and giving it to welfare queens who don't share their values.

That bootstrapping bullshit doesn't work so well on people who have truly experienced poverty, nor does talking about how much you love Jesus. Of course, many of them are skeptical that Democrats will do shit for them either, and rightfully so.

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Response to Hippo_Tron (Reply #16)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 04:08 PM

28. Good post. I also think...

...that a lot of evangelicals are now suburban middle class voters, rather than rural poor voters. And suburban middle class people, of course, tend to skew towards being right-wing on economics as well as being culturally conservative.

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Response to RKP5637 (Reply #1)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 04:28 PM

30. It has to do with history

In the early 1900s, a lot of Protestant missionaries from America were going around the world to spread the Gospel to other countries. Many were so shocked by the other cultures they visited that they became much more zealous in their religious faith. Additionally, there was a lot of anxiety over "modernism", the Progressive Era (which included expanding rights for women and workers) and the transition from rural to urban living that much of the US population was going through at that time. Finally, the rise of the Red Menace in the Soviet Union and other radical movements (at home and abroad), combined with the Red Scare, tying into the fears of immigration from "inferior" cultures...all of this combined to create a lethal cocktail that manifested itself in the reactionary, anti-progressive Protestant movement that became known as fundamentalism.

During the 20th century, there were a number of fundamentalist political "awakenings." In the 1920s, especially during the 1928 election, the Ku Klux Klan and other fundamentalist Protestant movements of the era campaigned aggressively against Al Smith, the first Catholic Presidential nominee. In the 1950s, the rise of middle-class suburbia and far-right politics during the McCarthy Era and the broader Cold War period created fertile ground for right-wing Christian politics which emphasized personal salvation, individual responsibility, anti-Communism, and the "Prosperity Gospel" which taught that God rewarded righteous behavior with material wealth and punished sin with poverty. Big business didn't just ally with organized religion; many churches and religious institutions were or acted like businesses.

Finally, in the 1970s, there was a huge backlash among conservative Christians against what they perceived as the liberal excess, sin, and cultural decay of the 1960s. The Southern Baptist conservative fundamentalist takeover, the furor over Roe v Wade, the Moral Majority's influence, and the rise of the Christian Coalition were all key factors in the political mobilization of the Religious Right, and the integration of them into the revitalized, harshly right-wing Republican Party. However, the global economic meltdown and Great Recession may have been factors in a possible shift. Additionally, much of the young population as well as the growing non-white population is either not religious or not fundamentalist (at least).

The Religious Right is not as powerful as it once was, and they know it. But they certainly won't go down without a desperate fight.

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Response to YoungDemCA (Reply #30)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 06:31 PM

31. Thank you very much for having taken the time to write this analysis! It's

greatly appreciated. Also, welcome to DU!

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 09:00 PM

2. Nice to see some are thinking

They are using their teachings and comparing them to the Republican candidates and how the Obama's actually live their lives. Logically, they are making the decision on who lives the teachings of Jesus and who provides lip service.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 09:13 PM

3. odd. So they prefer the Muslim over the Mormon?

 

heh. I note atheists support Obama 70%; rational thinking tends to lead one to the Democratic side, I guess.

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Response to provis99 (Reply #3)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 09:18 PM

4. Mormons go door-to-door

to poach the flock, Muslims don't. The fundies know that they can survive four more years of Obama better than they can weather a possible eight years of a Mormon.

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Response to provis99 (Reply #3)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 11:00 PM

12. Atheist/non religious support of the left makes sense

liberalism correlates with higher IQ, and so does atheism.

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Response to provis99 (Reply #3)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 12:28 AM

17. Those things don't matter so much when you're an incumbent

If you poll Republican faithful in southern states, you will get a large number of them who say that Obama is a Muslim. These people are hardcore partisans that couldn't be swayed under any circumstances whatsoever. Statements about him being a Muslim will rile up the absolute loyalists. But even among GOP-leaning demographics in general, they won't have the effect that they might've had in 2008.

It was the same thing with George W. Bush and going AWOL on his national guard duty. Liberals, who were going to vote for Kerry no matter what, loved the narrative that Bush was a rich brat who dodged military service when it was his turn and then sent poor kids off to die in a war of choice. But that narrative was hardly effective on the rest of the country, because they simply didn't care what Bush did in the 1970's. The only thing that they were evaluating him on is what he had done since he was appointed by the Supreme Court.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 09:39 PM

5. Good news, and I welcome their support.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 09:41 PM

6. They are looking to be their brother's keepers?

refreshing.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 09:44 PM

7. More likely is a good many of them just staying home

They are not going to turn out en masse for Bishop Willard Romney.

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Response to bluestateguy (Reply #7)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:57 PM

22. Exactly; fundies are not enthusiastic about Bishop Romney

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 09:57 PM

8. Mormonism is a huge issue for those folks. Huge.

Competition.

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #8)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 10:11 PM

9. Then why do they hate us Atheists so much,

we don't even believe in their myths?

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Response to yortsed snacilbuper (Reply #9)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 08:04 PM

24. Many believers don't understand the concept of 0.

If you don't share their beliefs, you worship the Devil.

That is why the argument persists that atheism is a religion, when it is clearly not.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 10:45 PM

11. I'm shocked that Obama's support among Evangelicals is even that high.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Wed Apr 4, 2012, 11:18 PM

13. I welcome evangelical support, very much so.

Like many others you may know, once you begin leaving the RW echo chamber, things can begin to look very different.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 12:05 AM

15. If this separates the evangelicals from the fundamentalists, it will be good for them as well as us

 

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 01:26 AM

18. Obama is the only Christian in the race

So why not? Works for me.

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Response to cthulu2016 (Reply #18)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 08:05 PM

25. Mormons are Christians.

"Jesus Christ" is part of the name of the church.

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Response to denem (Reply #26)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 11:21 AM

27. Anyone who claims Jesus as their personal savior is a Christian.

No one group (in the referenced article it is the Catholics) gets to decide.

The linked article argues that Muslims believe in Jesus, but they aren't Christian. That isn't a parallel. They don;t believe Jesus is their personal savior. I believe that Ronald Reagan was president from 1981 to 1989. That doesn't make me a Reagan supporter, or a believer in his doctrines.

Mormons simply add additional craziness and contradictions to and already crazy and contradicting religious story.

To assert to the contrary one must invoke the "No true Scotsman" fallacy.

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Response to Gore1FL (Reply #27)

Wed Apr 11, 2012, 10:46 AM

33. You are correct, Mormons are Christians.

Though most Christians look at them as a bizarre subsection of the religion.

As someone who is Christian myself, I don't bash anyone for their beliefs and don't want to push my beliefs on anyone. Mormons have the right to believe whatever they want.

So what I am saying is more what I hear from other Christians. Most of them will admit, when pressed on the issue, that Mormons are Christians in the technical sense of the word, but it doesn't mean they like them.

Even Baptists and Presbyterians have trouble getting along in small towns. Then along comes this group that tells you they've found a new book of the Bible that's even more mind-boggling than the ACTUAL Bible, and you can't drink Pepsi. You can only imagine the reaction to that.

Most Christians will admit "Yeah, they're with us," in a tone that sounds like more, "if they'd only fall of a cliff and die."

They are the black sheep of the Christian organization and many consider them to be a Christian cult. Though I don't go that far, because it is so easy to demonize things you don't agree with.

I often defend Atheist's rights to not believe and not have someone else's beliefs forced on them, even though I am a Christian, because it is the right thing to do. And I will defend a Mormon's right to not drink pepsi until the day I die.

It actually saddens me that Romney's faith is going to be a factor in this election. I mean, I don't want him to be president, but it has nothing to do with his religion.

As long as someone doesn't govern by their religion, then it shouldn't be an issue. And while he seems to have no strong principles, and has done a lot borderline crazy things, I don't think he governed Massachusetts with decisions based on his Mormon religion.

So I say leave it be.

If he hasn't brought it up in past politics, and doesn't show signs that he will use it as a governing tool in the future... let it be.

Instead, focus on the truth behind Bain Captial, the questionable decisions Romney has made in his career, the etch-a-sketch comment, the safety net comment, and more.

I don't care if our president is Muslim, Wiccan, or believes in the spaghetti monster.

The right wing... they will tear Romney down over this, and a guilty part of me is going to enjoy it, while being disgusted all at the same time.

I firmly believe that no one deserves to be torn down for their religious beliefs unless they try and force those beliefs on you.

For example my boyfriend (I'm gay) is an Agnostic, so I pray over my meals in silence. He doesn't even know. I would never ask him to pray with me, because I know that isn't his belief, and I love him with all my heart just the same.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 03:06 AM

19. The GOP establishment has told evangelicals that Wall St. rules the party and that..

 

...the evangelicals are to obediently get on the roof of the car. Naturally, some rebelled.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 01:29 PM

20. Well, evangelicals helped elect Jimmy Carter back in '76.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 02:17 PM

21. I wonder how much that is in absolute numbers.

That's what makes the difference.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:55 PM

23. They probably were scared by Palin's et al's lies about him in '08, but after watching him for the

past 3 years, must've figured out the TRUTH about him-that he's a Christian just like he SAID.

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 04:09 PM

29. I would imagine a lot of evangelical women and younger evangelicals...

..would be more likely to vote for Obama this time (though I don't know that for sure, so don't quote me on that).

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Response to Drunken Irishman (Original post)

Mon Apr 9, 2012, 10:18 AM

32. Maybe some of them are tired of voting for crazies

Insanity is what? Doing the same thing over and over again and expecting the same result, but that result will never occur?
these evangelicals get preached day in and day out that the Dems will turn their kids into Satan worshipping, Glee-watching namby-panpies, or multi-abortion having harpies, if they don't vote Rethugican every time.

Instead, what happens? The poor get hella poor and abortion is still on the books, the Tea Party is a racist joke that can't make a budget that reduces the deficit, Bush failed terribly, and the moderate Christians are annoyed by the fundamentalists running for office. Everything they thought to gain has got them nowhere by voting Republicans.

Maybe some of them have had enough of the birth-control wars, hate-the-gays wars, and women-are-not-equal wars. Maybe some of them just wanna vote for someone with a damn plan for once (Obama, Paul, and the 3rd party folks all have some kinda plan) or at least a track record that isn't horribly hypocritical (Obama).

It's still the economy that matters, I reckon.

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