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Thu Jan 17, 2013, 09:44 AM

Is Stanley McCrystal a democrat

Just asking some of his interviews seem a little on our side like the gun control.Had anyone seen articles on his politics ?

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Is Stanley McCrystal a democrat (Original post)
bigdarryl Jan 2013 OP
Mojo2 Jan 2013 #1
Mass Jan 2013 #2
TwilightGardener Jan 2013 #3
CincyDem Jan 2013 #4
think Jan 2013 #5
LiberalFighter Jan 2013 #8
Jeff In Milwaukee Jan 2013 #6
bemildred Jan 2013 #7
octoberlib Jan 2013 #9

Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 09:46 AM

1. Yesterday on PBS

I heard him interviewed, he is surely not a right wing nut. He would not come out and support a overhaul of the US gun laws, as he stated that he wanted to not take a political stance, but he indicated that no one outside of the armed forces should have access to military grade assault weapons.

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Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 09:47 AM

2. I think he may be, but there are plenty of Republicans that are on our side on gun controls.

As long as they do not need to be elected, at least. Joe Scarborough is a good example.

When they have to run, of course, the cower to the NRA.

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Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 09:47 AM

3. I think he said he voted for Obama in 2008.

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Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 09:58 AM

4. Having met him...

...in several situations since his retirement, I was genuinely surprised by his compassion. I know that sounds weird talking about ex-military leadership but the time/energy he has invested in helping support the families of injured vets is pretty amazing. And unlike most ex-military who go for the $$$ in media and/or defense industry, he's using his post service time working with several other ex-military guys developing leadership training programs for business and public-sector employees. I don't know this for fact but I've heard others say that his group doesn't even take training work contracts from defense contractors. Not sure why.

There is nothing about him even in casual conversations with small groups that is even close to "wing-nut". Never talked politics so I have no "truth" about his affiliation or voting record BUT...he doesn't feel like any modern day republican I know.

If he's republican, he's part of that virtually extinct rational wing of the party. Wouldn't surprise me if he falls into "I didn't leave the republican party, the republican party left me" group.

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Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 10:11 AM

5. No. Obama fired him. And he's "not a lobbyist" for the MIC now:

Generals Who Don't Just Fade Away: The Newest in Self-Dealing Maneuvers
Thursday, 29 March 2012 09:22 By Dina Rasor, Truthout | Solutions Column

~snip~

After the article appeared, President Obama brought McChrystal back from Afghanistan and promptly relieved him from duty. In Hastings' book, The Operators, he discussed how surprised the military was that Obama had, in abrupt Truman fashion, relieved this general who had spent his career promoting himself. McChrystal and his aides had been telling Hastings that Obama was a weak leader and a wimp (calling him just an orator, not a leader). They got caught up in their arrogance and met the same fate as General MacArthur.

~snip~

He also brought along former military men who worked for him into his new McChrystal Group, including Dave Silverman, a former Navy Seal who was on of his top aides in Afghanistan and was one of the staff that was the most derogatory about the president, and Sgt. Maj. Mike Hall, who had worked with McChrystal during a good portion of his career. Based on their web site's bragging about their skill sets, which emphasizes that they have the military discipline and methods to make companies work, they show no shame or discipline, and not only about what they did and said about the commander in chief. Even though our troops have worked hard and creatively in both Iraq and Afghanistan, the leadership of several of the top generals, including McChrystal, has been ineffective and chaotic. Many of these top commanders spent more time with military and civilian public relations staff to make them darlings of the news media and burnish their "brand" to be promoted to the next level.

~snip~

http://truth-out.org/news/item/8175-generals-who-dont-just-fade-away-the-newest-in-self-dealing-maneuvers

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Response to think (Reply #5)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 11:14 AM

8. I would dispute any military person saying they have the military discipline and methods

to make companies work. If businesses truly believed then all of the returning vets would be snatched up by them instead of many of them lingering around unemployed or under employed.

There are skill sets that translate to the business community but not generally in the managerial side IMO. If they were involved in emergency medical that would be good up to a point. If it was in anything involved in computer skills that should give help them out in obtaining a job related to that. Etc. If I was a business person I would be more inclined to hire someone further on down the chain of command than an egotistical weasel dick.

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Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 11:01 AM

6. He's a soldier

The good ones tend to keep their politics to themselves.

And unlike the Chickhawk Bridgade in Congress, he knows what it's like to have people shooting at you -- and that tends to give you less of a hard-on for sending people into combat.

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Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 11:02 AM

7. Not hardly.

What he is is very ambitious.

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Response to bigdarryl (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 03:50 PM

9. He got fired after comments he made in a Rolling Stone article

Remember that? That wasn'tthe only reason, though.


After arriving in Afghanistan last June, the general conducted his own policy review, ordered up by Defense Secretary Robert Gates. The now-infamous report was leaked to the press, and its conclusion was dire: If we didn't send another 40,000 troops swelling the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan by nearly half we were in danger of "mission failure." The White House was furious. McChrystal, they felt, was trying to bully Obama, opening him up to charges of being weak on national security unless he did what the general wanted. It was Obama versus the Pentagon, and the Pentagon was determined to kick the president's ass.



Last fall, with his top general calling for more troops, Obama launched a three-month review to re-evaluate the strategy in Afghanistan. "I found that time painful," McChrystal tells me in one of several lengthy interviews. "I was selling an unsellable position." For the general, it was a crash course in Beltway politics a battle that pitted him against experienced Washington insiders like Vice President Biden, who argued that a prolonged counterinsurgency campaign in Afghanistan would plunge America into a military quagmire without weakening international terrorist networks. "The entire COIN strategy is a fraud perpetuated on the American people," says Douglas Macgregor, a retired colonel and leading critic of counterinsurgency who attended West Point with McChrystal. "The idea that we are going to spend a trillion dollars to reshape the culture of the Islamic world is utter nonsense




Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/the-runaway-general-20100622#ixzz2IGfmFwM5
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

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