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Tue Nov 6, 2012, 02:41 PM

 

Went as expected.

We got up early to vote even though we still had zero power. We only had to go two blocks over to a centralized spot where they had machines up. Came home and was resigned to another day of living without electricity. Fortunately we finally got pot power a few hours ago but phone still doesn't work. I will be busy the next few hours and tomorrow doing whatever I can before the next storm due to hit tomorrow. I am afraid the power will go out again and we will again be at the bottom of the pecking order.

For those who don't know the pecking order for getting power it goes like this:

Wealthy areas where people with true money and power live

Businesses deemed "essential". Oh my how can the world exist without wall street.

Businesses that cater to wealthy plutocrats or tourists wanting to spend money. Let the starving cold peasants cheer marathon runners.

Business strips that give the allusion that everything is fine. Gee, if Rite Aid is open then all most be fine.

The poor parts of town deemed "scary". They may actually beat the crap out of politicians if they can find one. It's times like this when I really love them.

Apartment buildings filled with people not deemed scary but there are a lot of them and they keep calling and annoying politicians.

Homeowners are the last. Not wealthy or connected enough and usually docile until pushed to the limit. At best they will show one of them crying in front of their flooded and flattened home. Followed by a piece about how they should have purchased a generator. Followed by a piece about a home that went up in flames due to a generator. Eventually the news reporters will get tired of them calling and screaming and may report that things aren't "moving along". Eventually they will get power too.

I cannot believe another storm is coming. But at least I got to vote.

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Went as expected. (Original post)
lalalu Nov 2012 OP
Permanut Nov 2012 #1
lalalu Nov 2012 #2
SheilaT Nov 2012 #3
lalalu Nov 2012 #4
FlaGranny Nov 2012 #5
lalalu Nov 2012 #6
FlaGranny Nov 2012 #7
lalalu Nov 2012 #8
FlaGranny Nov 2012 #9

Response to lalalu (Original post)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 02:46 PM

1. Hearing your frustration here..

Good on ya for voting in the middle of that mess.

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Response to Permanut (Reply #1)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 02:51 PM

2. Thanks, just venting a little.

 

I am grateful I was able to vote. It seems there are some problems in other places.

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Response to lalalu (Original post)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 03:35 PM

3. Unfortunately, after major storms there are almost always

people without power for a week or more. In most of the country it's because not very many power lines are underground. In a place like NYC it's more like an incredibly complex (and no doubt in desperate need of upgrading) infrastructure.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #3)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 04:18 PM

4. More proof of how important this election is.

 

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Response to lalalu (Original post)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 05:05 PM

5. After our last hurricane

we were without power for 2 weeks. Over and over again, the priorities of power restoration stressed - first: police, fire, and hospitals; major stores and gas stations, then residential areas. It makes sense because even though there is no power in homes, those people need access to food, gas, and hospitals. Florida, at least my county, has changed a bit since then because all the major stores and most gas stations are now outfitted with generators . Hospitals always had generators, but they are not large enough to run a full hospital.

I know first hand how frustrating it is to see the lights come on all around your neighborhood and still be without, but another priority of the power company is to repair all major trunk lines first. Individual homes come dead last.

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Response to FlaGranny (Reply #5)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 06:53 PM

6. There is a law being proposed to mandate gas stations in NJ have generators.

 

The Florida law was cited as an example.

I don't have a problem with setting priorities if they are fairly instituted and with good reason. I can also understand first responders getting priority but I have a problem when police officers turn people away and hijack gas stations for family and friends. Yes that was happening. I also have a problem when resources are diverted from citizens to host events such as marathons or favored areas. Bloomberg finally got a clue.

We were very lucky compared to some and even took some people in. We had hot water, plenty of bottled water, a gas stove on one floor that could be used for range cooking, and non perishable food. It just seems too many people who live alone and may be sick or elderly are not being reached. I have to give a thanks to being around people in the military and learning how having a few supplies to help yourself can make a huge difference.

Help is not always around the corner and being prepared is not being paranoid. These types of survival skills need to be taught in school. Climate change is very real. We need to start training our young people for some rough times while we hopefully rebuild using common sense and better technology.

You are 100% right. Individual homes do come dead last and we certainly learned that the hard way

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Response to lalalu (Reply #6)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 08:04 AM

7. Unfortunately, there are

always people who take advantage of disasters. You are probably now overrun with so-called "contractors."

Bloomberg - he wasn't using his good sense, but came around, which is good. I'm sure he was thinking of bringing money and business to the area, but finally realized how he would be hurting area residents.

Our little HOA community has it's own generator, put in about 8 years ago, and our gasoline is delivered to us. The gas people always top us off before a storm reaches us. The generator treats our water and pumps our sewage. Homeowners can get gas from our tank to power their private generators (if they have them). So it's not too bad for us here now. Being without power for a/c in 90 degree heat is not so good, but it makes cold showers a lot more acceptable.

I grew up in NJ in the country and I remember a winter blizzard in around 1958 or 1959 (don't quite remember the year). We were without power for about 2 weeks. My father had a little stove in the garage, where he boiled down snow for drinking water and we cooked on it. Can't remember if it burned gas or coal. It was hard getting out from under the covers in the morning, it was so cold.

It sure does make a lot of sense to be prepared and if you live in any disaster prone area, it makes even more sense.

We people are tough though and we always get through our hardships (says the perpetual optimist).

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Response to FlaGranny (Reply #7)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 08:15 AM

8. My parents talked about that storm and a few others.

 

They were lucky but some areas got hit bad. I would be born a few years later so I missed it.

I probably was in your neighborhood a few times I use to visit the farms with my father when he went looking for seeds for his garden. He also took us fishing with him but not hunting. A lot of those areas are now developments and long gone.

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Response to lalalu (Reply #8)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 11:00 AM

9. That storm was hard to forget.

The snowdrifts were 10-12 feet high over the roads. They would clear the roads and the wind rebuilt the drifts in a couple of hours. If you were out driving you could easily get trapped between drifts.

So sad that many farms are gone and replaced by developments. Being a country gal, I loved the fields and woods. I used to go horseback riding in a area that is now solidy developed, but the area where I grew up as a child is next to the Wharton State Forest and that area is still mostly undeveloped. I like to take "drives" down the old roads and highways with Google Earth street view and see how the old stomping grounds have changed - some areas have massively changed, others not much at all.

P.S. My grandfather and father told stories about when they were young men around the turn of the 20th century. It was much colder then. The Delaware River usually froze solid so that you could walk across the river to PA. Snow was more frequent and deeper. Global warming in action, through family generations.

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