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Thu Aug 2, 2012, 09:26 PM

South Korea producing more engineering graduates than the US

Part of the problem here is that students don't want to go heavily into debt for a career of a few years, followed by tutoring of foreign replacements who will do those jobs much more cheaply.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/higher-ed/south-korea-outpaces-the-us-in-engineering-degrees/2012/07/17/gJQAOWagrW_story.html

—Any eighth grader who wonders if anyone actually uses algebra should ask Hyungtae Lee, an electrical engineer who writes algorithms to build computers with the power of human sight.

It’s a skill he learned first here in South Korea, where undergraduate students are five times more likely to major in engineering than their counterparts in the United States.

U.S. universities and companies often look abroad for students and workers to fill positions because not enough Americans have the necessary skills or training. To help meet the demand, President Obama has announced a goalto train 1 million more graduates over the next decade in engineering and related fields.

At a White House science fair in February, he told the young contestants, “You’re not just trying to win a prize today, you are getting America in shape to win the future. You are making sure we have the best, smartest, most skilled workers in the world, so that the jobs and industries of tomorrow take root right here.”

South Korea far outpaces the United States in the percentage of young adults with college degrees—63 versus 41 percent—and its K-12 students routinely outperform U.S. children on international assessments. While South Korean leaders have begun to fret that their young people—raised among skyscrapers and affluence—are pursuing higher-paying jobs outside technical fields, the workforce remains highly tech-savvy: One in four South Korean college students majors in engineering, compared to one in 20 in the U.S.

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Reply South Korea producing more engineering graduates than the US (Original post)
eridani Aug 2012 OP
Marrah_G Aug 2012 #1
Ian David Aug 2012 #2
Warpy Aug 2012 #3
EvolveOrConvolve Aug 2012 #4
Igel Aug 2012 #5

Response to eridani (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 09:47 PM

1. My son is going for Computer science- networking and security

But what he really want (when he can afford it) is a degree in aerospace engineering. The plan is that the degree he is getting now, which is also what he does for the Air force, will allow him to get a good enough job to be able to eventually afford the Aerospace program which is not offered at a state college, but rather at a private one.

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 10:06 PM

2. But they all think leaving an electric fan on while you sleep will kill you.

Korean Fan Death

Skeptoid #287
December 06, 2011
Podcast transcript

Today we're going to point the skeptical eye at a traditional belief from Korea, one at which many Westerners merely scoff. Many Koreans believe that sleeping in a room with an electric fan running is potentially lethal, even to the point that many Korean doctors and safety agencies formally warn against doing so. Scientists outside of Korea, however, easily dismiss the deaths as misdiagnoses of other conditions, and handily debunk the proposed mechanisms for the danger as implausible. But some Koreans have countered that there must be some explanation unique to Korea or Koreans: something to do with physiology, geography, or even their particular electric fans. Could Koreans be right that there is something more to this urban legend than mere tradition and confirmation bias?

Korean fan death isn't very old; not even going back as far as the use of electric fans in the country. The first electricity was installed at Gyeongbok Palace in 1887, just a few years after Schuyler Wheeler made the first two-bladed electric fans commercially available. By 1900, companies like Toshiba were manufacturing and selling electric fans throughout Asia. Despite nearly a century of history of usage without incident, in the 1970s the Korean media suddenly began reporting cases of fan death. They happened in the summer, in a closed room, and usually involved an elderly person sleeping alone, with an electric fan running in the room. In the morning, the victim would be found dead, with the only evident cause of death being the electric fan still sitting there, blowing its supposedly lethal breeze.

The situation today is that government safety agencies warn that fans must be used safely. The Korea Consumer Protection Board analyzed reports of heat-related injuries during the summer months for the three years prior to 2006, and made recommendations to address the five most often recurring dangers, with the first on the list being that doors should be left open when using electric fans or air conditioning.


Fan death warning label
(Public domain image)


More:
http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4287

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 10:13 PM

3. If you want more of something, subsidize it.

If you want less of something, tax it, either by levying revenue or forcing people into debt.

That's how it works, guys.

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Thu Aug 2, 2012, 10:30 PM

4. I work for a tech company that has tens of thousands of various types of engineers on staff

When we advertise a job, often 90% or more of the applicants are Korean, Chinese, Indian, Bangladeshi, etc. 30 years ago, the company was entirely American born and educated. That number now is less than 50%.

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Sat Aug 4, 2012, 11:34 PM

5. I teach high school science.

Juniors and seniors.

The kids whose parents aren't engineers or well educated can't imagine themselves doing this kind of work. Those focused on science are mostly focused on health, and they focus on being a nurses. I haven't found a way of convincing them that physical science is relevant to them and their careers.

Those who do have educated parents usually have parents with engineering or science-based jobs. Many want to do English, history, political science. They almost to a student say their parents have to put up with too much crap: this regulation, that regulation, this law that might be changed and cause a redesign but might not be changed, this regulation that used to mean X but suddenly means Y. OSHA. And the HR regulations. Those who clearly want to be in business say they want to train for where the real power is: human resources, finance, and government regulatory agencies.

Instead of making things and making things work better, they want to either study people or push people around (if reasonably well off) or serving people (if poor). Makes sense: They live in a human universe, where all their physical needs are provided by people and everything important involves manipulating people.

Forced weeks harvesting potatoes as part of the harvest seems like a good idea.

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