HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Science » Science (Group) » Bright New Supernova Shin...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Tue Feb 19, 2013, 08:28 PM

Bright New Supernova Shines in Southern Skies

by BOB KING on FEBRUARY 19, 2013

New supernova 2013aa, discovered by Stu Parker on February 13, 2013, is southwest of the spiral galaxy NGC 5643 in the southern constellation Lupus. This photo was taken three days later. Credit: Joseph Brimacombe

SN 2013aa popped off in the barred spiral galaxy NGC 5643 in the constellation Lupus the Wolf 34 million years ago, but no one knew its light was wiggling its way across the cosmos to Earth until New Zealand amateur astronomer Stu Parker nailed it during one of his regular supernovae hunts. Parker recorded it on Feb. 13, 2013. Since it was so far from the galaxy, he thought at first it was a hot pixel (electronic artifact) or an asteroid. Another look at the galaxy 5 minutes later confirmed it was really there.

Good thing. It turned out upon confirmation to be the brightest supernova he and his band of supernova hunters had ever discovered.

Stu is a member of a 6-man amateur supernova search team from Australia and New Zealand called BOSS (Backyard Observatory Supernova Search). They’ve been working together since 2008 with the goal of searching for and reporting supernovae in the southern sky. When a member finds a candidate, they contact profession astronomers who follow up using large telescopes. To date the group has found 56 supernovae with Stu discovering or co-discovering 45 of them!


Read more: http://www.universetoday.com/100101/bright-new-supernova-shines-in-southern-skies/

18 replies, 5484 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 18 replies Author Time Post
Reply Bright New Supernova Shines in Southern Skies (Original post)
n2doc Feb 2013 OP
niyad Feb 2013 #1
longship Feb 2013 #2
Roland99 Feb 2013 #5
Fantastic Anarchist Feb 2013 #12
longship Feb 2013 #13
Fantastic Anarchist Feb 2013 #14
longship Feb 2013 #15
Fantastic Anarchist Feb 2013 #16
JimDandy Feb 2013 #3
Spitfire of ATJ Feb 2013 #4
friendly_iconoclast Feb 2013 #6
longship Feb 2013 #7
Spitfire of ATJ Feb 2013 #8
nikto Feb 2013 #9
Spitfire of ATJ Feb 2013 #10
nikto Feb 2013 #11
Ready4Change Feb 2013 #17
RILib Feb 2013 #18

Response to n2doc (Original post)

Tue Feb 19, 2013, 08:29 PM

1. k and r--thank you for posting this

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to n2doc (Original post)

Tue Feb 19, 2013, 09:02 PM

2. The northern hemisphere bias.

By far, many of the coolest things in the universe are not visible from the northern hemisphere. The closest star to the sun, Alpha Centauri, appears only in the southern skies. The largest globular cluster and the putatively most dangerous star in the galaxy also show only in the south (Omega Centauri and Eta Carinae, respectively).

That's why the largest visual observatory on the planet is in the Atacama desert high in the Andes in Chile. The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) sits at 15,700 feet altitude. Dry as a bone, the Atacama is where the Extremely Large Telescope is being built, and where the world's greatest observatories reside. (There, and at Hawaii's Mauna Kea 13,780 ft peak and on La Palma in the Canary Islands.)

Short of launching a telescope into space, the best we can do is to put someplace high and dry. The higher and drier, the better. There's no place drier than the Atacama, and at about 10,000 feet, it gets the scope above a lot of the distorting atmosphere.

The Hubble Space Telescope is awesome, but you cannot launch a 40 meter diameter telescope into space. At least not yet. But, you can build one with a 40 meter mirror at 10,000 feet in the Atacama desert.


Over four times the size of the largest ever, and it will blow the Hubble away.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to longship (Reply #2)

Tue Feb 19, 2013, 10:51 PM

5. Just saw a PBS documentary on ALMA. Here's a trailer >>>>

http://www.optimumtelevision.com/programmeview.php?pid=41


the full show doesn't seem to be available online from what I can find.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to longship (Reply #2)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 11:24 AM

12. I thought Proxima Centauri was the closest star (other than the sun)

I have seen lists where Alpha Centauri is listed first, and where Proxima Centauri is listed first. I know it's the same star system. Why the discrepancy? I wonder if it has anything to do with Proxima's orbit, and how long it takes for each revolution around Alpha.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Fantastic Anarchist (Reply #12)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:29 PM

13. Proxima Centauri is closest by a little.

Like most of the stars in the galaxy Proxima is a red dwarf. It's orbital period is thought to be very long because it is very distant to Alpha Centauri A and B, the other two stars in the Alpha Cen system.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to longship (Reply #13)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:38 PM

14. Right, but why are there discrepancies in the list?

I'm just interested in knowing.

A. Centauri A is a sun-like star, correct? And P. Centauri is a red dwarf. Is that the criteria for determining which is closer? If so, I don't understand the logic. Both are stars. If P. Centauri is closer to earth during its orbiting period, it should be listed first in all lists.

Does P. Centauri revolve around the other two, or just A. Centauri A?

On edit: I could be wrong, but isn't Proxima Centauri about a light-month closer to earth than the other two stars?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Fantastic Anarchist (Reply #14)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:57 PM

15. Proxima is a weird one.

As I wrote, it is very distant to the A star and it's period of revolution is probably on the order of hundreds of thousands of years.

Here's the Wiki entry: Proxima Centauri

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to longship (Reply #15)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 01:01 PM

16. Thanks, I'll read that.

Hundreds of thousands of years. I didn't know that. Then it stands to reason that Proxima Centauri should be listed first until it's orbit is on the far side of Alpha Centauri.

I'm just a big Proxima Centauri defender! Like the moon, it keeps getting the shaft!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to n2doc (Original post)

Tue Feb 19, 2013, 09:35 PM

3. What a great idea.

I love endeavors like this.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to n2doc (Original post)

Tue Feb 19, 2013, 10:13 PM

4. Still wanna see this....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #4)

Tue Feb 19, 2013, 10:56 PM

6. You just might...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 02:39 AM

7. Close enough to see during daylight.

It could go any second now, which means within a few hundred thousand years in cosmic terms.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to longship (Reply #7)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 02:47 AM

8. For all we know it already blew 600 years ago....

We just won't see it from here for another 40.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #4)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 02:57 AM

9. Don't wanna' see this...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to nikto (Reply #9)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:21 AM

10. I guess it's a matter of perspective...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Spitfire of ATJ (Reply #10)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 03:31 AM

11. As long as there's no Alien GOP...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to n2doc (Original post)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 09:39 AM

17. Someone way out there had a bad morning.

A supernova can ruin your whole day. (and civilization.)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Ready4Change (Reply #17)

Fri Feb 22, 2013, 04:50 PM

18. Our sun becomes a red giant eventually.

 

No nova or supernova for you, earthlings!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread