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Tue Jan 8, 2013, 03:29 AM

Kepler telescope: Earth-size planets 'number 17bn'

8 January 2013 Last updated at 02:16 ET
Kepler telescope: Earth-size planets 'number 17bn'
By Jason Palmer
Science and technology reporter, BBC News, California

Astronomers say that one in six stars hosts an Earth-sized planet in a close orbit - suggesting a total of 17 billion such planets in the galaxy.

The result comes from an analysis of planet candidates gathered by the Kepler telescope.

The Kepler team also announced 461 new planet candidates, bringing the satellites' total haul to 2,740.

The findings were announced at the 221st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in California.

More:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-20942440








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Reply Kepler telescope: Earth-size planets 'number 17bn' (Original post)
Judi Lynn Jan 2013 OP
MAD Dave Jan 2013 #1
Confusious Jan 2013 #2
MAD Dave Jan 2013 #5
DryRain Jan 2013 #3
Javaman Jan 2013 #4
TupperHappy Jan 2013 #7
FiveGoodMen Jan 2013 #6

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 07:43 AM

1. Awesome News

The sheer number of earth sized planets in the habitable zone almost ensures life elsewhere in our galaxy. If we find evidence of life on Mars, life outside our solar system becomes a mathematical certainty.

It is not our technology that limits our travel to other star systems, it is the sheer enormous distance that makes it nearly impossible.

Remember that human radio signal that have escaped into space have only created a circle about 200 light years in diameter and radios aves travel AT the speed of light.

Our "reach" in the Universe is incredibly small.

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Response to MAD Dave (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 07:58 AM

2. Alcubierre drive

10x faster then the speed of light.

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Response to Confusious (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 10:21 PM

5. Way Cool!

I'd never head of that. What an interesting concept. I bet the pocket of high energy particles is less of a problem than executed as well.

We may just visit some of our neighbours.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 08:23 AM

3. And this is ONLY our own Milky Way Galaxy!

 

How many galaxies are out there? Not just a few, I recall.

For example, in 1999 the Hubble Space Telescope estimated that there were 125 billion galaxies in the universe, and recently with the new camera HST has observed 3,000 visible galaxies, which is twice as much as they observed before with the old camera. We're emphasizing "visible" because observations with radio telescopes, infrared cameras, x-ray cameras, etc. would detect other galaxies that are not detected by Hubble. As observations keep on going and astronomers explore more of our universe, the number of galaxies detected will increase


http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/021127a.html

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 11:12 AM

4. So not just billions and billions of stars but planets too! nt

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Response to Javaman (Reply #4)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 10:06 PM

7. "Bill-yuns and bill-yuns"

Paging Carl Segan...

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 02:00 PM

6. Paging Dr. Drake...

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