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Sun Dec 30, 2012, 04:23 PM

Cool video of a Coelacanth.

Wow, those suckers are HUGE!



What an awesome fish.

24 replies, 5260 views

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Arrow 24 replies Author Time Post
Reply Cool video of a Coelacanth. (Original post)
Odin2005 Dec 2012 OP
secondvariety Dec 2012 #1
DollarBillHines Dec 2012 #2
BlueJazz Dec 2012 #3
Lisa0825 Dec 2012 #4
Crunchy Frog Jan 2013 #10
Lisa0825 Jan 2013 #11
PoliticAverse Jan 2013 #16
FailureToCommunicate Dec 2012 #5
FailureToCommunicate Dec 2012 #8
lastlib Dec 2012 #6
Curmudgeoness Dec 2012 #7
BlancheSplanchnik Jan 2013 #17
eppur_se_muova Dec 2012 #9
lovemydog Jan 2013 #12
adieu Jan 2013 #13
BlancheSplanchnik Jan 2013 #19
UnrepentantLiberal Jan 2013 #14
WHEN CRABS ROAR Jan 2013 #15
BlancheSplanchnik Jan 2013 #18
snot Jan 2013 #20
Surya Gayatri Jan 2013 #21
jcgrey12 Jan 2013 #22
NinetySix Jan 2013 #23
Sancho Jan 2013 #24

Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sun Dec 30, 2012, 06:47 PM

1. Amazing.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sun Dec 30, 2012, 07:11 PM

2. Wow.

I would love to be that close to one of those fish.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sun Dec 30, 2012, 11:03 PM

3. Wow...they're still the same after 400 million years. I'm blown away. He/she is beautiful.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sun Dec 30, 2012, 11:38 PM

4. Very cool, but I wish they could have observed from a distance

rather than practically harassing it.

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Response to Lisa0825 (Reply #4)

Tue Jan 1, 2013, 01:35 AM

10. I'm sure it will recover. They seem very resilient.

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Response to Crunchy Frog (Reply #10)

Tue Jan 1, 2013, 01:44 AM

11. It just bothers me whenever I see any animal disturbed in the wild...

And as a diver myself, most responsible divers I know feel the same.

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Response to Crunchy Frog (Reply #10)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 11:43 PM

16. If they become too used to humans they won't last another 400 million years. n/t

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Mon Dec 31, 2012, 10:06 AM

5. "Alright Mr. DeMille, I'm ready for my close-up"

Wow!

Such an accommodating creature.

SO docile.

So amazing!

Thanks Odin

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Response to FailureToCommunicate (Reply #5)

Mon Dec 31, 2012, 02:05 PM

8. First time I ever even HEARD of one was here:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Mon Dec 31, 2012, 12:36 PM

6. That.Is.F**king.AWESOME!!!

No creature in the world like it! Miraculous that it has survived virtually unchanged for so many millions of years!

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Mon Dec 31, 2012, 12:56 PM

7. I absolutely love the story of the re-discovery of the coelacanth.

This is the dream of every scientist, amateur or professional...and as often happens, it was just a fluke that everything fell into place.




In 1938, thirty two-year-old Marjorie Courtenay Latimer was the curator of a tiny museum in the port town of East London, northeast of Cape Town, South Africa. She had befriended a local seaman, Captain Hendrick Goosen, of the trawler Nerine, which fished the nearby coastal waters of the Indian Ocean. When he put into port the captain made a frequent practice of having the dockman call Miss Latimer to come look over the Nerine's catch. She was welcome to take any unusual specimens she might want for her museum.

On December 23rd, 1938, the Nerine entered port after a stint trawling off the mouth of the nearby Chalumna River. The dockman called Marjorie, who was busy mounting a reptile collection, but felt she ought at least go down to the docks to wish the crew of the Nerine a merry Christmas. She took a taxi, delivered her greetings, and was about to leave when, according to her account, she noticed a blue fin protruding beneath a pile of rays and sharks on the deck. Pushing the overlaying fish aside revealed, as she would later write, "the most beautiful fish I had ever seen, five feet long, and a pale mauve blue with iridescent silver markings." Marjorie had no idea what the fish was, but knew it must go back to the museum at once. At first the taxi driver refused to have the reeking, five-foot fish in his cab, but after a heated discussion, he drove Marjorie and her specimen back to the museum.



The rest of the story: http://www.dinofish.com/discoa.htm

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Response to Curmudgeoness (Reply #7)

Fri Jan 4, 2013, 11:47 AM

17. WOW! great story!

Thanks! !

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 07:09 PM

12. Cool!

It looks old!

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 09:13 PM

13. Haven't changed in 400 million years

They're the GOP of fishes.

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Response to adieu (Reply #13)

Fri Jan 4, 2013, 11:54 AM

19. oh don't insult that majestic creature!

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 11:26 AM

14. Love coelacanths.

 

They're dinosaurs.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 09:26 PM

15. Wow to see a living fossil in it's own enviroment, what a treat.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Fri Jan 4, 2013, 11:53 AM

18. wow Odin thank you for this

Soooo beautiful and....well just awe inspiring.

Perfect background music too.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Fri Jan 4, 2013, 11:55 AM

20. Per Wikipedia, they are "the most endangered order of animals in the world."

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Fri Jan 4, 2013, 10:31 PM

21. A 400 million-year-old relic--incredible and beautiful...

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 01:18 PM

22. WOW Thanks for sharing!

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 11:51 PM

23. The primitive Coelacanth is a fascinating relic of a lost era, but...

 

...I can't help but be just as fascinated by the question, "why is that guy diving in khakis and an oxford shirt?"

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 08:17 PM

24. I'd be curious about the dive...

how deep, etc.? At any rate, I also wouldn't want to disturb or chase anything I see on a dive. It's a neat video though.

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