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Thu Aug 9, 2012, 12:48 PM

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This message was self-deleted by its author (GliderGuider) on Tue Aug 21, 2012, 04:59 PM. When the original post in a discussion thread is self-deleted, the entire discussion thread is automatically locked so new replies cannot be posted.

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Reply This message was self-deleted by its author (Original post)
GliderGuider Aug 2012 OP
Viva_Daddy Aug 2012 #1
GliderGuider Aug 2012 #2
Viva_Daddy Aug 2012 #3
GliderGuider Aug 2012 #4
Viva_Daddy Aug 2012 #5
GliderGuider Aug 2012 #6

Response to GliderGuider (Original post)

Sat Aug 11, 2012, 07:46 PM

1. Yes, enlightenment is not for the squimish or faint of heart.

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Response to Viva_Daddy (Reply #1)

Sat Aug 11, 2012, 09:00 PM

2. Have you read "I Am That" by Nisargadatta?

I finally started it - it seems I had to be ready for it. His pointers are so powerful and clear they drop me straight into the witness every time I pick the book up. The sense of "I am" is pretty constant now - if I notice that I've started to drive around in my concepts, simply asking "Who is thinking?" puts everything back in place. Satchitananda, and all that...

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Response to GliderGuider (Reply #2)

Sun Aug 12, 2012, 12:55 PM

3. I have read it, yes, although it has been some time ago since I read it.

In the last few years, I have preferred to read Western writers on the subject: people like Sailor Bob, John Wheeler, Annette Nibley, Scott Kiloby, Nathan Gill, and especially Douglas Harding. Coming from my academic background, I find Western writers easier to relate to.

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Response to Viva_Daddy (Reply #3)

Sun Aug 12, 2012, 01:28 PM

4. Thanks for the list.

I've encountered Sailor Bob and Harding, but not the others. Do you teach?

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Response to GliderGuider (Reply #4)

Sun Aug 12, 2012, 01:42 PM

5. I don't teach Advaita. My degrees are in Religious Studies and Theology.

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Response to Viva_Daddy (Reply #5)

Sun Aug 12, 2012, 01:49 PM

6. Are you sure?

Last edited Sun Aug 12, 2012, 03:11 PM - Edit history (3)

Your pointer to John Wheeler just caused something that felt a lot like learning...

Thank you.
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Edited to add: No, it felt a lot like stopping.

The point is simple: Just ... Stop.

I wonder if that message is so hard to hear because our monkey-minds tell us things like this: "Being is doing, doing is being. If you stop doing you will stop being. I don't want to stop being!!! So don't stop, do something!!!"

And then seekers who are "on a path" can say things back to their monkey-minds like, "Don't worry, it's OK. I am doing something - I'm learning how to Stop."

And the monkey says, "Oh well, learning about Stopping isn't Stopping. Learning is OK. Just make sure you don't Stop."

And the monkey-mind calms down and goes back to sleep in the corner while the seeker goes on learning, and not Stopping.

I think I'll stop now.

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