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Sat Nov 3, 2012, 12:43 PM

Faith community is integral to the healthy masculinity movement

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/guest-voices/post/faith-community-is-integral-to-the-healthy-masculinity-movement/2012/11/02/8cb3856a-253a-11e2-ac85-e669876c6a24_blog.html


Posted at 06:43 PM ET, 11/02/2012
Faith community is integral to the healthy masculinity movement
By Jared Watkins

The Rev. Reverend Rob Keithan of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice began his address at the Healthy Masculinity Summit in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 19, with a quote from musician Butch Hancock: ďLife in Lubbock, Texas, taught me two things: one is that God loves you and youíre going to burn in hell. The other is that sex is the most awful, filthy thing on earth and you should save it for someone you love.Ē The quote brought raucous laughter to the room of 200 students and professionals, but it also reflected a view held by many progressive people and organizations that faith and organized religion are antagonistic of a forward-moving society.

Iím sure many in the room were wondering how a movement based on rejecting traditional notions of masculinity for a healthier masculinity based on nonviolence, respect for all people, and social-emotional intelligence could be reconciled with religions that seem to hold onto traditional masculinity with all their energy.

The summit, co-hosted by Men Can Stop Rape and the Verizon Foundation, was the kick-off of the Healthy Masculinity Action Project (HMAP), a two-year initiative to mobilize men and women around the country to spread the value of healthy, nonviolent masculinity. Organizers reached out to faith-based organizations to act as allies, including Jewish Women International, the United Methodist Church General Board of Church and Society, and K-Life Ministries, groups that work toward economic and social justice for historically underrepresented populations with little fanfare and very little mainstream media attention.

The work of those groups better represent my own experiences with faith and religion than the faith groups that dominate mainstream conversation. This might seem strange since my hometown, Farmington, N.M., has much in common with Lubbock. Itís a conservative, oil and gas town where the Planned Parenthood doesnít even perform abortions but is still plagued by picketers and where even wedding ceremonies arenít immune to pastoral lectures on the evils of evolution.

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Response to cbayer (Original post)

Sat Nov 3, 2012, 12:57 PM

1. Faith is not integral to anything. How long until we all can acknowledge this fact?

Anything can be done without "faith". (yes, obtuse one's, it religious faith that is being discussed here).

Because some folks use their faith as the motivation for something (both good and bad) does not mean it is integral at all.

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Response to cbayer (Original post)

Sat Nov 3, 2012, 07:06 PM

2. Men should obey the Biblical principle of not raping anyone they aren't willing to marry if caught.

I would assume that's the plan.

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Response to dimbear (Reply #2)

Sun Nov 4, 2012, 10:15 AM

4. Wow, that's ugly. Did you read the article?

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Response to cbayer (Reply #4)

Sun Nov 4, 2012, 11:25 AM

5. Yeah, it's ugly.

It's also a biblical moral guideline. Don't attack him, it's the holy text you grew up with and followed.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #4)

Sun Nov 4, 2012, 06:37 PM

6. Yes indeed, but I was uncomfortable starting with the lead.

We actually have a fundamental disagreement. I think, to be fair, you feel the unfair treatment of women can be righted within the church while I feel that it is integral to the church.

I call as my witness eighteen centuries of history. There are isolated counterexamples, but the weight of history is with me.

Admittedly I cited an unfortunate relic from the Bible, but you will admit it wasn't the worst one I could have tabled.

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Response to dimbear (Reply #6)

Sun Nov 4, 2012, 06:47 PM

7. I will call as my witnesses these women:



Despite 18 centuries of history, which I agree has not been kind women, do you not think anything has changed for women in the catholic church during that time?

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Response to cbayer (Reply #7)

Sun Nov 4, 2012, 07:05 PM

8. I admire those women, as do you. I am also very uneasy for their future.

I'll go out on a limb and predict that is a picture of several future ex nuns.

Which is IMHO sad but true.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #7)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 07:08 AM

9. I think your picture does more to argue against your position than for it. n/t

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Response to cbayer (Reply #7)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 09:47 AM

10. So your argument is the same as those that support homeopathy?

If it works as well as placebo, then it must be effective?

Your picture is the anomaly is this whole equation. Just as Dimbear pointed out, excepting the miniscule examples (as you have provided), 18 centuries of evidence support his assertion. Why is this such a difficult fact to admit?

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Response to cleanhippie (Reply #10)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 10:58 AM

11. And as I noted, her picture isn't even a good counter-argument.

Here we are, 18+ centuries later, and not only A) is that STILL the highest position a woman can attain in that organization, but also B) they're still being threatened rather than listened to by church leadership.

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Response to cbayer (Original post)

Sat Nov 3, 2012, 08:15 PM

3. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,

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