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Sat May 12, 2012, 08:40 AM

 

What's in your survival tin?

Last edited Wed Jun 6, 2012, 07:35 AM - Edit history (1)



1 - Tampon Yes a Tampon! tinder or water filter and if it fits in the tin a condom used for water carrier, and tourniquet.

2 - Pencil

3 - Waterproof Paper

4 - Waterproof Matches

5 - Wire Saw

6 - Knife (trimming blade)

Pocket Swiss knife (not in tin, but on person)

7- Fire Striker

8 - Fishing Line

9 - Fishing hooks

10 - Safety Pins

11 - Salt Pack

12 - Whistle (Not in tin, but on person)

13 - Wire

14 - Lighter

15 - Button Compass

16 - Candle

17 - Clear Plastic Bag/s

18 - Tinder i.e. Char rope Cotton wool + Vaseline is great for starting fire (Not in tin, but on person)

19 - Waterproof electricians Tape (Seal tin?)

20 - Pain killers + (plasters)

21 - Big Elastic Band around tin

22 - Sharpener

23 - Mirror

24 - Hacksaw Blade

Other things on my person are head light, always three ways to start a fire, a small tarp, emergency blanket, guy rope, some homemade fuel tablets, map and a phone.

Buddy burner

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Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 20 replies Author Time Post
Reply What's in your survival tin? (Original post)
MichaelMcGuire May 2012 OP
Hoyt Jun 2012 #1
MichaelMcGuire Jun 2012 #2
Bum_Whisperer Jun 2012 #3
MichaelMcGuire Jun 2012 #4
Callisto32 Jun 2012 #5
MichaelMcGuire Jun 2012 #6
Starboard Tack Jun 2012 #7
MichaelMcGuire Jul 2012 #8
Starboard Tack Jul 2012 #9
gejohnston Jul 2012 #10
petronius Jul 2012 #11
Starboard Tack Jul 2012 #13
MichaelMcGuire Jul 2012 #14
petronius Jul 2012 #12
MichaelMcGuire Jul 2012 #15
petronius Jul 2012 #16
MichaelMcGuire Jul 2012 #17
petronius Jul 2012 #18
MichaelMcGuire Jul 2012 #19
loli phabay Jul 2012 #20

Response to MichaelMcGuire (Original post)

Tue Jun 5, 2012, 09:38 PM

1. Thanks. Great quick summary. Need to make that.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #1)

Wed Jun 6, 2012, 07:29 AM

2. You can buy ones, but the items tend to be not very good.But can be replaced later with better ones.

 

This list suits my needs and my climate. It isn't limited, there could be other items of use to be added. On other note there are many videos on how to make char cloth or char rope and or making a buddy burner. Just remember to get lots of practice using all the items and lighting fires with flint, n steel and using different types of tinder. Making different shelters, using the environment, building reflectors to reflect the heat from the fire, and keeping warm in general.

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Original post)

Sat Jun 23, 2012, 09:40 AM

3. No tin...

I have a lighter, knife and pistol with me at all times. I can figure out the rest.

BTW, I have the lighter and I don't smoke.

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Response to Bum_Whisperer (Reply #3)

Sun Jun 24, 2012, 05:31 AM

4. A Fire Striker and a good knife. But the whole point is a great deal of the items, can be bonuses.

 

That most fit into something the size of a tobacco tin, which is the size of next to nothing, why wouldn't you take them? That if you have, can greatly make life a hell of a lot easier.

I don't go without them {fullstop}

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Original post)

Thu Jun 28, 2012, 02:09 PM

5. Glad to see I'm not the only one preaching the gospel of condom-canteen.

Just make sure they aren't lubed.....don't ask me how I know this....PLEASE don't ask me how I know this.........

ETA: Maybe consider a way to make potable water in a hurry and on the go. I like the iodine tablet solution, personally, because I don't really ever plan on using them (Fire is the cleanser, after all), they work in a pinch, and are very, very small. Also, a sewing kit is too useful to not have for the negligible weight added. Maybe it just puts a button back on your suit, but hey...

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Response to Callisto32 (Reply #5)

Fri Jun 29, 2012, 04:45 AM

6. non-spermicidal condoms have multi uses, including but not limited too stopping babies.

 

The tablets work well but I've never used them myself, and are said to taste funny, but they are still my first choice if needs must. failing that I'd collect rain water and or draw condensation, and or find water source and just filter water and always boil it. Scotland is blessed with rain and many sources I'd be happy to drink from, if needs be. In saying that I'd still look out for dead animals up stream or stay away from sources with no plants near it and minerals at the edges and any bones from animals another clue that the source is unsafe.


But I always tell people where I'm going, the route I'm taking, and when I'm likely to be back. If they don't hear from me, I trust them to sound the alarm. Long trips I'd still be keeping in contact at numerous points in the route/stay.



a sewing kit is too useful to not have for the negligible weight added. Maybe it just puts a button back on your suit, but hey...


Exactly

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Original post)

Sat Jun 30, 2012, 06:29 PM

7. Great post. All good stuff.

Does your phone have GPS?
If you are going into remote areas you might want to consider carrying one of these

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Response to Starboard Tack (Reply #7)

Sun Jul 1, 2012, 07:21 AM

8. My phone has a GPS and surprising good signal.

 

I don't think, I've been anywhere I couldn't make a call from. But tell us more about this.

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Reply #8)

Sun Jul 1, 2012, 12:28 PM

9. You're lucky to always get a cellphone signal.

Doesn't happen in remote areas of the US, or on the ocean where I spent a lot of time. The SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger, using 100% satellite technology, works virtually anywhere in the world, even where cell phones don’t – all with the push of a button.

It has the following functions.
SOS: In the event of a life threatening or other critical emergency. The GEOS International Emergency Response Center alerts the appropriate agencies worldwide – for example contacting 9-1-1 responders in North America and 1-1-2 responders in Europe.

Help: In the event of a non-life threatening emergency, you can use this function to notify your personal contacts that you need assistance.

Check-in/OK: This feature allows you to let your friends and family know that all is OK with a pre-programmed message along with your GPS location.

Custom Message: This feature allows you to let your friends and family now receive a custom message along with your GPS location with a push of a button. Use this feature as a secondary OK message or transfer your personal help alert to this message function if you are using a SPOT Assist service on your Help button.

Track Progress: Start/stop tracking at any time using your SPOT device (Additional service required). You can also mark a Reference Point or send Check-in/OK messages from specific locations while in Track Progress mode.
http://findmespot.com/en/index.php?cid=102

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Response to Starboard Tack (Reply #9)

Sun Jul 1, 2012, 12:39 PM

10. I'm guessing you own a SPOT?

I was pondering a similar device for treks in the Wyoming wilderness during my next escape from Florida.

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Response to gejohnston (Reply #10)

Sun Jul 1, 2012, 01:26 PM

11. I have one of the 1st generation SPOTs, and I really like it

I've never used it to summon help, but the check-in feature is really nice for reassuring family of my progress when I'm backpacking alone. And although I take pains not to let the perceived 'safety net' influence my behavior, it is reassuring to know it's there when I'm a couple of high steep passes beyond from the trailhead.

I have noticed that tree cover and other interference can lock the transmission (and there's no way to tell if the message went through from the user end). To ensure success, I usually seek out a clear area and leave it exposed until it makes all three attempts. If the check-in function function doesn't matter to you, a dedicated PLB with a slightly higher certainty of getting through (and no subscription fee) would be another option...

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Response to gejohnston (Reply #10)

Sun Jul 1, 2012, 04:29 PM

13. Actually, I don't. Yet.

But will definitely buy one before doing an ocean crossing. I've been looking at them, and similar devices such as EPIRBs, for quite a while. We stay within 100 miles of the coast most of the time, where VHF works fine and cell coverage is pretty good. We'll invest in a good EPIRB and SSB radio before doing any major passage. The technology keeps improving and prices are going down, so there's no rush.
The SPOT is an excellent all round device for oceans, desert and mountains, because you can transmit brief status messages.
We already carry several GPS devices, from dedicated marine GPS to cellphones to an I-PAD, which has some great apps for navigation. Even has an AIS app called Ship Finder, which needs an internet connection, but is great when close to, or crossing shipping lanes.

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Response to Starboard Tack (Reply #9)

Mon Jul 2, 2012, 05:11 AM

14. I may look into getting one.

 

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Original post)

Sun Jul 1, 2012, 01:38 PM

12. Mine is a pouch rather than a tin, but it contains:

small first aid kit
water purification pills
coffee filter (paper, for murky water)
sewing kit
whistle
mirror
tiny LED light
knife
firestarter and tinder
space blanket
paracord
small compass
30 gallon trash bag

I generally also have a bit of backup food and some spare clothing, and fishing gear on backpacking trips. Paper and writing implements are there as well, but I never thought of them as survival gear - good idea! I'm also planning to add a saw and/or saw blade this season; thanks for the reminder...

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Response to petronius (Reply #12)

Mon Jul 2, 2012, 05:18 AM

15. All good stuff in there. I carry space blanket in a pocket and paracord can't get it in the tin.

 

Ever tried Vaseline and cotton balls for a fire starter, I keep mine in a extra mints

One of these.

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Reply #15)

Mon Jul 2, 2012, 01:24 PM

16. Right now I have some of those pre-made sticks from Coughlan's,

with the match-tip-like striker built in. But I really like the greasy cotton balls (I've used them before), and that's what I'll replace the current things with when I refresh the kit.

Another thing I use when I'm feeling lazy about campfire building is sanitizer from my toilet kit - smear some of that on small pieces of wood and it usually does the trick...

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Response to petronius (Reply #16)

Tue Jul 3, 2012, 11:19 AM

17. On the sanitizer, I couldn't get mine to work.

 

Do you make, your own fire tablets?
Seen one like this???



Can be fun.

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Reply #17)

Thu Jul 5, 2012, 12:14 AM

18. Awesome! I'd have to really need a fire before I'd be able to burn something

that adorable...

I've never actually made or used a fire tablet; my current stoves are either canister or alcohol depending on how elaborate my menu is going to be, so the only other fire need is campfire for pleasure. I have the tinder in my survival kit, but when it's a fun-fire I'm pretty fixated on doing it 'naturally': local tinder and wood, a knife, and just one match...

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Response to petronius (Reply #18)

Fri Jul 6, 2012, 05:56 AM

19. I know its also a bit on the large side. But I have teeth, butterfly, pot and Gingerbread man moulds

 

The tablets are made by melting a large candle that I can get cheap. Filling the silicone mould with cotton wool that acts like the wick then pour the candle wax into the mould. Wait it they harden of course. You can also just use cotton balls and just dip them into the wax. Each ball can burn about 2-3 mins. NOTE that the tablets will soot up the pan they can make a mess.


I use the canister with my good pots and pans or normally if I have to stay in a camp site where no open fires are allowed.

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Response to MichaelMcGuire (Original post)

Wed Jul 18, 2012, 01:02 AM

20. I have all these in my truck survival pouch also a .22 rifle, a fishing rod and some lures

 

also got my glock that i always carry and a couple of nice machetes, you never know when the zombies will come.

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