HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Reading & Writing » Non-Fiction (Group) » 2014: What are you readin...

Fri Mar 21, 2014, 08:55 AM

2014: What are you reading at the moment?

College textbooks for me...

32 replies, 12981 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 32 replies Author Time Post
Reply 2014: What are you reading at the moment? (Original post)
Neoma Mar 2014 OP
gollygee Mar 2014 #1
msedano Mar 2014 #2
YankeyMCC Mar 2014 #3
Little_Wing Mar 2014 #4
closeupready Mar 2014 #5
TomClash Apr 2014 #6
LoisB Apr 2014 #7
dem in texas Apr 2014 #8
onager May 2014 #9
nilesobek May 2014 #10
womanofthehills Jun 2014 #11
fortintype Jun 2014 #12
closeupready Jul 2014 #13
closeupready Jul 2014 #14
Jean4CountyClerk Jul 2014 #15
dorrismay Aug 2014 #16
peter anders Feb 4 #32
YOHABLO Aug 2014 #17
Chemisse Aug 2014 #18
Skarbrowe Oct 2014 #19
SheilaT Nov 2014 #20
closeupready Dec 2014 #21
Tom Ripley Apr 2015 #22
mainstreetonce Apr 2015 #23
womanofthehills Aug 2015 #24
Zorro Oct 2015 #25
Zorro Oct 2015 #26
Zorro Nov 2015 #27
Tikki Nov 2015 #28
Zorro Nov 2015 #29
Zorro Jan 2016 #30
eissa Feb 3 #31

Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Mar 21, 2014, 09:17 AM

1. The Empire of Necessity

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Mar 21, 2014, 09:25 AM

2. Chicana Erotic Novel

Reading again in prep for her swing through SoCal to sign it, Ana Castillo's sure-to-be-a-hit Give It To Me.

http://labloga.blogspot.com/2014/01/review-give-it-to-me-la-palabra-quest.html

Castillo practices eroticism not for its own sake but as part of her ongoing investigation of mujerismo, independent womanhood that might be translated.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Mar 25, 2014, 08:00 PM

3. Wanderlust: A History of Walking by Rebecca Solnit

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Wed Mar 26, 2014, 01:59 PM

4. Five Days at Memorial by Sheri Fink

Fink writes in compelling detail about the horrible unfolding of events at Memorial Hospital in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. I've wanted to read this since it was published, but it took a while to work myself up to the experience. Even so I'm digesting it in small doses, as the whole nightmare of what happened to that city still fills me with despair.

Fink is an excellent writer, btw.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Mar 28, 2014, 04:47 PM

5. Summer Cooking, by Elizabeth David.

 

This isn't a normal cookbook - not much of a cookbook at all. More of a sort of good eating guide from an Englishwoman who was well-known in the mid-20th Century, and wrote about food conventions, as a critic. Kind of a Beat Generation character, really, but preached of revolution in domestic living.

And she wrote with such erudition that it's just fun reading what she wrote.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Apr 20, 2014, 12:36 PM

6. Thomas Piketty

Capitalism in the Twenty-First Century.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Apr 27, 2014, 06:22 PM

7. Children of the Atomic Bomb by James N. Yamazaki and Flash Boys by Michael Lewis

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Wed Apr 30, 2014, 05:48 PM

8. The Graves are Walking, The Great Famine and the Saga of the Irish People

I am only four chapters into this book, but it is a great read. What is fascinating is the attitude that the British had toward the poor Irish of the 1940's is the same as how the Republicans view the poor now, especially the blacks. Don't want to give them any assistance for fear they will come to depend on it. Lots of sad stuff in the book. I also learned a new word, immiseration.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Thu May 15, 2014, 08:39 PM

9. "Embers of War" by Fredrik Logevall

Full title: "Embers of War - The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam"

Fascinating history of events concerning Vietnam from 1946-1954. I've read many books about how the US got involved in Vietnam, and this is one of the best and most detailed. Logevall had access to recently declassified material from American, British, French, Chinese, Russian and Vietnamese archives.

At times the book reads like a John LeCarre thriller about low dealing in high places. With some of the lowest dealing coming from America's High Priest of the Domino Theory in the 1950s, Secretary of State John Foster Dulles.

It's amazing how very close the USA came to sending American combat troops to Vietnam in the early 1950s. Aside from Dulles, two people constantly pushing for that were Vice-President Richard Nixon and Admiral Arthur Radford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

Nixon and Radford even seriously floated the idea of using nuclear weapons in Vietnam, to save the French from defeat.

Saner people noted that China might react rather...strongly to nukes being used right next door. To which Radford suggested hitting China with a few nukes as well.

No wonder British diplomats, in their back-channel messages, called Radford a "belligerent dim-bulb," among other things.

And that's part of what makes the book so fascinating - the wealth of detail about the political haggling behind the scenes. Haggling that was going on between the Eastern as well as the Western powers, with Ho Chi Minh and Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap constantly having to fend off "suggestions" from their Chinese advisors.

A good absorbing read. Highly recommended.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sat May 31, 2014, 03:10 PM

10. "God's Middle Finger,"

and "Fatal Shore," by Robert Hughes.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Jun 1, 2014, 02:26 AM

11. Robert Oppenheimer - a Life Inside the Center by Ray Monk

Actually, I'm listening to it as it's way too long to read. I live 50 miles from the Trinity site so I'm pretty fascinated by Manhattan Project books.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Jun 8, 2014, 03:27 PM

12. The Reagan Casualties by Jacob Klezaras


I've only been reading it for like two days, but so far it's a really interesting read. It's all about Reagan's foreign policy and his involvement in different genocides and insurgencies. When I saw the title I was thinking it would just be all about Iran-Contra and all the stuff I normally associate with the Reagan administration's foreign policy, but it actually goes into way more than that. It isn't a very long read, you could probably finish it in an afternoon if you wanted to. It's definitely reinforced my view of what a terrible president Ronald Reagan was.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Wed Jul 9, 2014, 02:31 PM

13. Skeletons of the Zahara - nonfiction account of early 19th Century slavery

 

in Saharan Africa. Eye-opening, and riveting.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Jul 25, 2014, 12:20 AM

14. I'm reading "House of Morgan" by Ron Chernow -

 

at about 725 pages, I figure it will take me (at my comfortable reading rate) about a month to finish.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Jul 25, 2014, 10:48 AM

15. No time to read this summer

Campaigning.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Aug 5, 2014, 10:22 PM

16. mr. music man by mervyn conn, fiction or non fiction...

Just been reading an 'autobiography' by mervyn conn where he says he was found innocent of attacking a 19 year old.

Mervyn Conn's conviction for attacking his 19 year old receptionist Margaret Malloy in 1989 was UPHELD ON APPEAL.

Mervyn Conn attacked her just 4 days after she started working for him.

The Front Page Headline of the Sun Newspaper dated Thursday 7th December 1989 says,
'GROPING MUSIC TYCOON GETS JAIL'.

Judge Robin Laurie says of Mervyn Conn, 'Without the victim's consent you embraced her and fondled her genital area'. The judge imposed an eight week prison sentence and 1000 pounds compensation.

The Judge concludes, 'A custodial sentence is the only way this Court can properly deal with the circumstances'.

Mervyn Conn pleaded guilty, admitting indecent assault at London's Southwark Crown Court. Yet he appealed the sentence imposed; that prison was too harsh. The Appeal Court maintained the eight week sentence, but suspended it for two years. This is unambiguous. Guilty, with an eight week suspended sentence and 1000 pounds compensation. After all, he pleaded guilty, and said it was a 'moment of madness'. (Royal Courts of Justice, Friday 12th January 1990. Case Number 89/6677/Z2. File name: CONN/896677Z2. File number 019900112. Before Lord Justice Lloyd, Mr. Justice Tudor Evans and Mr Justice Owen. Regina v. Mervyn Harold Conn)

Yet when we read Mervyn Conn's book Mr Music Man, he says on Page 179 last paragraph,
'...I needed support after an employee made false allegations about me, which ended up all over the front pages of the papers'.

Mervin Conn continues, 'I was up for a knighthood and all that disappeared because mud sticks, even if you have been found innocent by the Courts. Tainted by this false accusation I found I was out of the Hurlingham Club'.

Let us make no mistake, despite what Mervin Conn writes in his book, the Sun correctly states 'his lawyers appealed the jail sentence'. NOT HIS CONVICTION.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dorrismay (Reply #16)

Thu Feb 4, 2016, 04:15 PM

32. mervyn conn now charged

mervyn conn was formally charged at Sutton Police Station on 2nd February 2016 at 4pm.

The charged carry a maximum of life imprisonment,

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Wed Aug 13, 2014, 08:56 PM

17. Now reading "The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap" by Matt Taibbi

Just finished "Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth" by Reza Aslan

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sat Aug 16, 2014, 07:07 PM

18. I just finished "The Hot Zone", about Ebola

I really enjoyed it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Wed Oct 29, 2014, 05:20 AM

19. "This Changes Everything" by Naomi Klein

Very depressing. Sadly, I'm not as optimistic as Ms. Klein. The book throws a lot at you and it is definitely worth reading. Just keep thinking happy thoughts.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Nov 7, 2014, 04:32 PM

20. Just finished "Flight 232" about the crash

of United Airlines flight 232 in Sioux City, Iowa on July 19, 1989. Excellent.

Now I'm reading "The Teacher Wars" by Dana Goldstein, a history of the teaching profession in America.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Dec 7, 2014, 11:45 PM

21. Diane Von Furstenberg's "The Woman I Wanted To Be" -

 

I'll be honest that I'm a little disappointed - on the one hand, she knows how to write, and how to engage the reader. On the other, it's a memoir that is thin on details and long on embellishment. I'm not that far in, so I'll reserve judgment until I've gotten further in.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Apr 17, 2015, 01:02 PM

22. Billy Idol's autobiography (really), The Tinkerers, The Best of Early Vanity Fair

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Aug 11, 2015, 11:42 PM

24. Just finished "Chasing the Scream:"

"The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs" by Jonann Hari.

There were a lot of discussions on DU about this book which made me want to read it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Thu Oct 8, 2015, 10:45 PM

25. Just finished Fortune's Children: The Fall of the House of Vanderbilt

Extraordinary stories of the astounding extravagance of the Gilded Age and the dissipation of an enormous family fortune.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Oct 18, 2015, 07:49 PM

26. No Easy Day

Very interesting description of Navy SEAL life -- and the mission to "capture" Bin Laden -- by someone who grew up in a missionary family in Alaska.

Has a couple of gratuitous swipes at Obama.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Nov 1, 2015, 01:27 PM

27. Finished reading Herb Block's Here and Now

Herb Block (Herblock) was for decades the preeminent WaPo editorial cartoonist and the one who coined the term "McCarthyism". This book contains dozens of his cartoons from the early 1950s, with an accompanying commentary on the times and events.

What is striking is how familiar it all seems -- rapacious big business interests, influence peddling, political paranoia, spying on citizens, political cowardliness, falling education system, etc. Seems as if some things never change.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2015, 09:02 PM

28. PACIFIC

author Simon Winchester.

Tikki

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sat Nov 14, 2015, 10:22 PM

29. Just wrapped up "Witness to a Century" by George Seldes

He was the European correspondent for the Chicago Tribune in the WW1 and post-WW1 era, and met a number of famous artists and notorious figures from that era -- Picasso, Hemingway, Lenin, Mussolini, Hitler, and many others. His insights and personal anecdotes reveal unreported quirks of dozens of personalities of that and later eras, including key figures in American politics.

It's a highly recommended read.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Jan 24, 2016, 05:38 PM

30. "I Didn't Do It For You" by Michela Wrong

Very well-written summary of key historical events in Eritrea over the past two centuries, and its tenacious struggle to achieve independence from European colonialism and from Ethiopia.

One interesting anecdote answers the mystery of what happened to Haile Selassie's body after being deposed by the DERG. Apparently the DERG's leader Mengistu Haile Mariam had his body buried face down under a latrine in the garden outside Mengistu's office.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Neoma (Original post)

Wed Feb 3, 2016, 01:50 PM

31. "In the Time of the Butterflies"

I know this is a mix of fiction and non-fiction, but I included it here because the Mirabal sisters did exist and this book is largely focused on their lives as heroic revolutionaries in the Dominican Republic under Trujillo.

I'm about 20 years late reading this, but I absolutely loved it. I had no idea that the UN's International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women was inspired by their murders. The book itself is so wonderfully written, interweaving the perspective of each sister. You knew what the ending would be, and dread it as it nears, but just can't put the book down. Now I want to watch the movie!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread