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Sat Jan 5, 2013, 03:51 PM

What are you reading the week of January 6, 2013?

The Girl on Legare Street by Karen White - Tradd St. #2

2013 book#2

19 replies, 1337 views

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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply What are you reading the week of January 6, 2013? (Original post)
DUgosh Jan 2013 OP
Curmudgeoness Jan 2013 #1
krispos42 Jan 2013 #2
backtoblue Jan 2013 #6
Lydia Leftcoast Jan 2013 #3
Lydia Leftcoast Jan 2013 #9
getting old in mke Jan 2013 #4
DisgustipatedinCA Jan 2013 #5
backtoblue Jan 2013 #7
fadedrose Jan 2013 #8
fadedrose Jan 2013 #10
matt819 Jan 2013 #13
pscot Jan 2013 #11
matt819 Jan 2013 #12
fadedrose Jan 2013 #16
matt819 Jan 2013 #17
fadedrose Jan 2013 #18
matt819 Jan 2013 #19
Recursion Jan 2013 #14
getting old in mke Jan 2013 #15

Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 06:04 PM

1. "Fall of Giants" by Ken Follett

First book in what is called the Century Trilogy.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 08:35 PM

2. "Digital Fortress" by Dan Brown

Yeah, I know, but it's fast moving, and a nice counterpoint to "The Blind Watchmaker", which I just finished reading.

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Response to krispos42 (Reply #2)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 01:17 PM

6. That's actually a pretty good read.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 12:43 AM

3. Bedside book: "Last Will" by Liza Marklund, a Swedish writer

Just finished reading "Blood Orchids" by Toby Neal as my purse book. I haven't yet decided what my next purse book will be, though.

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Response to Lydia Leftcoast (Reply #3)

Thu Jan 10, 2013, 01:36 PM

9. This week's purse book: "Kingdom of Strangers," by Zoe Ferraris

I highly recommend her (so far) three mystery novels that take place in Saudi Arabia. She was married to a Saudi for a while and actually lived in the country for a couple of years. She shows the absurdities and Catch-22s that arise when, for example, you're trying to conduct a police investigation in a country where 1) The official line is that only foreigners commit crimes, 2) All the women are fully veiled in public, making identification hard and disguise easy, and 3) Men are not supposed to talk to women outside their families, 4) Women are not allowed to drive but may take taxis or use chauffeurs, as long as their husbands or fathers allow it, 5) Marriages are arranged and adultery is severely punished, 6) Servants and other low-status workers are lured from Third World countries with promises of high wages and glamorous jobs only to be kept in slave-like conditions and forbidden to leave the country without their employer's permission.

Ferraris also captures the ways that Saudi women cope or fail to cope with a society that educates them but sharply limits what they are allowed to do.

I'm sorry that she's written only three books so far.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 08:18 PM

4. _Leviathan_ by Scott Westerfield

YA Steampunk.

Just finished the last in the Jim Butcher's Alera Codex, _First Lord's Fury_.

Current audiobook _Shadows in Bronze_ by Lindsey Davis, Marcus Didius Falco #2. Falco is a "private informer" during the reign of the Emperor Vespasian. Interesting, too, since in takes place in and around the Bay of Naples in CE 71, eight years before the famous eruption of Vesuvius and my wife and I are also watching a series of lectures from the Teaching Company about Pompei. Serendipity, I guess.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 12:06 PM

5. Winter of the World, by Ken Follett

This is the second in a planned trilogy that started with the World War I-based Fall of Giants. Winter of the World is set before and during World War II.

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Response to DisgustipatedinCA (Reply #5)

Tue Jan 8, 2013, 01:18 PM

7. Pillars of the Earth was good, but very long.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Wed Jan 9, 2013, 09:39 AM

8. TALKING TO THE DEAD (2012) Harry Bingham

http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/B_Authors/Bingham_Harry.html

About Fiona Griffiths, a young detective constable with a philosophy degree from Cambridge, in Cardiff, Wales who has a gift of the book's title...

2/2013

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 12:31 PM

10. MY SOUL TO TAKE (2009) by Yrsa Sigurdardottir


Series about lawyer Thora Gudmundsdottir in Reykjavic, Iceland.

This is 2nd of 3 available in US at this time, 4th due Feb.26, and 5th on May 9, 2013.

Terrible crimes, but Thora has a soft touch with a bit of humor, mostly in what she's thinking, not saying.


http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/Y_Authors/Yrsa-Sigurdardottir.html


Book 3 fo 2013

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Response to fadedrose (Reply #10)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 02:42 PM

13. I just started the latest installment from Arnaldur Indridason

You have to chuckle. Here's a country of maybe 300,000, and it seems that there is a disproportionate output of crime novels. I'd always wanted to visit Iceland, but with all that crime , I'm not so sure.

(Of course, the same can be said of Oxford, England after you read the Morse novels.)

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 01:03 PM

11. good grief, I lost a week

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Jan 12, 2013, 02:38 PM

12. Gun Machine and Flight Behavior

Gun Machine is the second novel by a graphic novelist/artist, Warren Ellis. It's basically a police procedural with the most dysfunctional people you could imagine, which is what sets it apart from your usual police procedural. If you take your usual off-beat forensic techs from, say, CSI New York, and multiply the nutting ten-fold, you have the techs in this book. The detective is an equally off-beat NYC history buff who just wants to be left the fuck alone to do his job, which, of course, the supremely insane police higher-ups won't do. It's weird, but it's a fun read. I just got his first book out of the library.

Then there's Flight Behavior by Barbara Kingsolver, which I'm listening to. I'm surprised that this hasn't been the subject of any discussion here, as it captures, I think, the essence of the left/right, rural/urban, educated/un- (under?) educated divide. It's a bit tedious and pedantic in parts, but it's worth the time. I'm about 2/3 of the way through, and I don't know how it's going to turn out, but to this point it's more than a little frightening to think that Kingsolver is right about the conservative end of the spectrum. Nothing we don't already know, but still an eye-opener in some ways.

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Response to matt819 (Reply #12)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 02:55 PM

16. Gun Machine is pretty good

Even though I have to read some sentences twice. Ellis uses more than "cop" language, he seems to have invented another one. Can't see he can solve all the crimes in one book.

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Response to fadedrose (Reply #16)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 04:29 PM

17. Crooked Little Vein

I'm almost done with Ellis's first book. You can't help but keep asking the question, how does he come up with this stuff? But you definitely won't be disappointed. I doubt I'll take on the graphic novels, but I will remain alert to the non-graphic ones.

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Response to matt819 (Reply #17)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 11:15 PM

18. I requested CROOKED LITTLE VEIN

Haven't read it yet, have you?


(In Gun Machine, where our Detective is visibly tiring of a witness's beating around the bush , the guy says, "Stay sat." and then tells him more. Never heard that one before.)

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Response to fadedrose (Reply #18)

Sat Jan 19, 2013, 11:57 AM

19. I finished Crooked Little Vein last night

The gist is that the White House Chief of Staff - the book was written in 2007, so we know what regime he's talking about - hires a two-bit NY private eye to recover a secret version of the Constitution, in the form of a book that has the unique power to return America - all of us - to the path of moral correctness. Hilarity ensues.

The private eye tracks the book from NY to Columbus, OH, to Texas to Las Vegas to LA to Beverly Hills, with each stop weirder than the one before it, though I think Texas and Las Vegas were pretty weird.

The book's a riot.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sun Jan 13, 2013, 10:36 PM

14. "Treason's Harbour" by Patrick O'Brien

Best sentence so far:

"The adagio called for delicate and subtle phrasing, and it called in vain."

Any othe Aubrey/Maturin fans on DU?

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Response to Recursion (Reply #14)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 08:34 AM

15. Aye.

Just passed through the series again last fall. Well, everything except 21.

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