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Sat Nov 17, 2012, 05:22 PM

What are you reading the week of November 18, 2012?

A Pointed Death by Kath Russell

2012 - Book #173

21 replies, 1399 views

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Arrow 21 replies Author Time Post
Reply What are you reading the week of November 18, 2012? (Original post)
DUgosh Nov 2012 OP
Auggie Nov 2012 #1
LWolf Nov 2012 #2
getting old in mke Nov 2012 #3
northoftheborder Nov 2012 #4
Laurian Nov 2012 #5
joseph abbott Nov 2012 #6
fadedrose Nov 2012 #10
SheilaT Nov 2012 #16
fadedrose Nov 2012 #21
SheilaT Nov 2012 #7
getting old in mke Nov 2012 #8
SheilaT Nov 2012 #9
Neonfilm Nov 2012 #11
fadedrose Nov 2012 #13
fadedrose Nov 2012 #12
fadedrose Nov 2012 #14
getting old in mke Nov 2012 #15
fadedrose Nov 2012 #18
getting old in mke Nov 2012 #19
fadedrose Nov 2012 #20
SheilaT Nov 2012 #17

Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 05:29 PM

1. Empire Express: Building the First Transcontinental Railroad

Talk about crooks ...

Bain, David Haward / Viking Press, 1999

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 07:15 PM

2. The Watson's Go To Birmingham - 1963

For young readers. So far so good. I'm fascinated by the ultra glide:

#!

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 07:41 PM

3. _Down By the River Where the Dead Men Go_ by George Pelecanos

Third Nick Stafanos book.

Pelecanos is a genius at noir.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 08:43 PM

4. The Casual Vacancy, by J. K. Rowling

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Response to northoftheborder (Reply #4)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 09:22 PM

5. I was considering that book. What's your opinion so far?

I read some reviews that said it was a slow start, but that the characters were well developed. The slow start was warning flag for me as I don't always have the staying power to slog through a "slow start".

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Nov 17, 2012, 10:01 PM

6. Beaten Zone: Literary War Fiction written by vet of Iraq and Afghanistan

Beaten Zone by A. McLean Swanson is a great read. The $0.99 price didn't hurt either.
From the book:
He looked at the photo on the wall where he stood holding the gun and his face showing the white of his teeth in a grin proud to be the guidon barer of some forgotten bastion layered in the dust of wars once fought and never to be fought again. A forlorn hope. He held the bottle to his lips tilting just so and the beer collected in the neck but did not touch his tongue. He could smell it, the beer, and taste it too. Bitter. He could hear his wife unloading and sacking his things, placing them in containers for wash, trash, and further sorting. He thought of the blast that took Ducreuxís life. It recategorized the world around him; stripped him of his pride and invincibility, transmuted his very existence like a fly through a fan when the blades donít strike it passing through that nanosecond of chance moving from nature to construct. A place where the lines run parallel and perpendicular and donít make a damn lick of sense to it as it keeps slamming its head into an invisible wall trying to get back into the world it knows but canít obtain. A fly couldnít explain such an event. He couldnít explain his. He heard not a sound, saw not a light, nor felt heat. It just was or was assumed or was explained when he woke on the side of the road being yelled at and wiped clean of blood in an attempt to find a wound that did not exist. Something happened. He drank.

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Response to joseph abbott (Reply #6)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 04:11 PM

10. Welcome to Fiction

Couldn't find this at the library, or in book form at Amazon, but found it there under the author's name, A McLean Swanson. It's only available in Kindle form, which I don't have or use, so I won't get this to read, but it sounds good and got 5 stars at Amazon in 6 reviews...

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Response to fadedrose (Reply #10)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 04:39 PM

16. I really hate it that books are now becoming only available

for the Kindle or the Nook or some other device I don't own and don't intend to go out and buy. Despite the enthusiasm many have for the ereaders, the majority of books are still being read the old-fashioned way.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #16)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 06:15 PM

21. And the reason we don't buy the devices....

Is that we love books, real books.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 01:20 PM

7. In The Kingdom of Men

by Kim Barnes. In 1967 a young woman moves to Saudia Arabia when her husband gets a job there.

Unfortunately, it's already overdue at the library, so I may have to return it and then check it out again.

Also The Great Mortality by John Kelly about the Black Death. And Spillover by David Quammen about diseases that leap from animals to humans.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #7)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 01:54 PM

8. So...

light, upbeat, and comedic this week, eh?

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #8)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 02:03 PM

9. Oh, yes.

A cheerful assortment of books!

Actually, I have long been interested in epidemiology and I've read quite a bit of what's out there. As someone who is stunningly healthy, I am fascinated by disease.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 07:18 PM

11. The Unlikley Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

Just finished reading 'The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry' - a suprisingly moving book about redemption. Highly recommended.

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Response to Neonfilm (Reply #11)

Mon Nov 19, 2012, 09:39 PM

13. Welcome to Fiction Neonfilm

I looked up your book written by Rachel Joyce in Amazon, saw a good review, and I think I'll like the book too.

Just ordered it from the library but I have 3 or 4 to finish before I get to it. I usually read only mysteries, but in this case, I'll make an exception. Thanks for the rec.

http://www.amazon.com/Unlikely-Pilgrimage-Harold-Fry-Novel/dp/0812993292/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1353378667&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Unlikely+Pilgrimage+of+Harold+Fry

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sun Nov 18, 2012, 11:51 PM

12. THE DARK WINTER (2012) by David Mark

Last edited Wed Nov 21, 2012, 12:15 AM - Edit history (1)

This is first book in this series. Second book is due out UK in Feb. 2013.

Aector McAvoy, a detective sergeant in Hull, East Yorkshire, England. His wife's name is Roisin. Aector and Roisin.

http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/M_Authors/Mark_David.html


Book 115 of 2012

Just finished this - I think it was pretty good, not great, but good.

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 08:50 AM

14. ZERO DAY(2011) by David Baldacci

About John Puller, a combat veteran, now Special Agent in the U.S. Army's Criminal Investigation Division. This is the first of a new series. The second was due out 11/20/12 - The Forgotten. I'm up to page 27 or so, and it looks like it might be pretty good.


http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/B_Authors/Baldacci_David.html

Book 116 of 2012

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Response to fadedrose (Reply #14)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 12:05 PM

15. I will look for it.

I think of Baldacci's books as tasty snacks to be ripped through in a day or two, standalone, Camel Club, or King and Maxwell.

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Response to fadedrose (Reply #14)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:35 PM

18. Disappointing

Too long and only worth reading for 200 or so pages.

Usually a book starts out poorly and get better. This one does the opposite.

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Response to fadedrose (Reply #18)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 02:51 PM

19. Too bad

I checked it out of the library yesterday, but haven't started.

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Response to getting old in mke (Reply #19)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 06:14 PM

20. Please read it all the way thru, goim....

I read it to the very end. I'm dying to get another opinion. Maybe it's just me...

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Response to DUgosh (Original post)

Sat Nov 24, 2012, 04:52 PM

17. I just finished

The Great Mortality. Really, really good. Maybe I should go over to the Health forum and suggest it.

The mortality rate from the plague during that time, 1347-1351 or so, was staggering. I town or locality got off lightly if only 20% of the population died. In contrast, the 1918 flu epidemic which is considered to have been quite deadly, only 10-20% of those infected died. And the infection rate was considerably less than what occurred in the 14th century. And 20% was a low death rate. In most places anywhere from 30-70% died. Not of those infected, but of the original population.

John Kelly, the author, spends a fair amount of time discussing the various death rates in different areas, how good the statistics are, and why it was so deadly and why the death rates varied so much. Several things are important. One is that the level of cleanliness on the part of Europeans was low. That doesn't even describe it. Most people did not change their clothes for months at a time, and rarely if ever bathed their entire bodies. People were routinely infested with fleas and lice. Peasants typically lived right alongside their animals. Public sanitation and removal of garbage or human waste was essentially non-existent. Another fascinating aspect was that about 25 years earlier there had been famine conditions in most of Europe. In those areas where the child mortality from the famine was greatest, there were fewer plague deaths. The reason? Childhood malnutrition keeps the immune system from developing properly. So in those areas where more children survived, they weren't as readily able to resist the plague as adults.

We also forget that plague stuck around, and kept on breaking out all over Europe every few years for about three centuries. It was the huge number of deaths in that first outbreak that altered life permanently. Anyway, I highly recommend this book to anyone at all interested in the topic.

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