HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Race & Ethnicity » African American (Group) » 4 Famous Black Feminists ...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 07:06 PM

4 Famous Black Feminists You Never Learned About in School

Feminism, the age old F-word, is a key reason why millennial women are able to do the things they do.

Feminism has broken down barriers of inequality and liberated the daughters of a past generation to have it all: college educations, fulfilling careers, relationships on their own terms, and progressive status within their families. As women, we owe a lot to the feminist movement and to the leaders like Gloria Steinem who inspired a generation.

In honor of Black History Month, and in honor of the feminists women of color who have gone unacknowledged in the mainstream folds of the movement, I present to you a list of some of the most radical black feminists of all time.

Radical and revolutionary are terms that can be empty when not understood within their context. The following women are radical feminists because of their desire to bring attention to the plight of black women, which in some cases was and is different from the struggles of white women. Dealing with social conditions like slavery, structural racism, poverty and a denial of education, they called attention to the needs of black women in the U.S. in their own unique ways. And like other feminists, they were not afraid to be the first to do so.



http://www.policymic.com/articles/27159/black-history-month-4-famous-black-feminists-you-never-learned-about-in-school

http://www.democraticunderground.com/125516507

6 replies, 1416 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 6 replies Author Time Post
Reply 4 Famous Black Feminists You Never Learned About in School (Original post)
Blue_Tires Feb 2013 OP
Number23 Feb 2013 #1
MotherPetrie Feb 2013 #2
JustAnotherGen Feb 2013 #3
Number23 Feb 2013 #4
streaming1 Apr 2013 #5
mzteris Apr 2013 #6

Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 08:12 PM

1. "in honor of the feminists women of color who have gone unacknowledged"

"in honor of the feminists women of color who have gone unacknowledged in the mainstream folds of the movement"

Sigh. Par for the course. We've had lots of conversations in this forum over the years about the lack of women of color in positions of prominence within the feminist movement. Both the real movement and the much more minor one here on DU.

K&R Florynce Kennedy particularly sounds like my kind of woman.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Mon Feb 25, 2013, 09:29 PM

2. K&R

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Tue Feb 26, 2013, 04:09 PM

3. Hmmm

Feminism has broken down barriers of inequality and liberated the daughters of a past generation to have it all: college educations, fulfilling careers, relationships on their own terms, and progressive status within their families. As women, we owe a lot to the feminist movement and to the leaders like Gloria Steinem who inspired a generation.



But the only problem is. . . did Steinem every really SEE us? Did any of the those who are 'prominent'. I know Faludi and Wolf do. But did all of them?

I think I like this list - but they should have put Ida B. Wells on there. Some might say - Eh? Didn't she 'break' the bond between white and black feminists? And they can say that - that's okay.

But she also refused to march at the back of a Temperance/Suffrage Parade so that White Southern Women could feel comfortable knowing that 'Sapphire' is at the back - far far away from them so they don't need anyone to get the vapors.

And sadly - very few woman and black Americans in general know who she is. And her name does not roll easily off the tongues of white feminists in America either.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JustAnotherGen (Reply #3)

Tue Feb 26, 2013, 06:05 PM

4. Such a great post.

did Steinem every really SEE us? Did any of the those who are 'prominent'.

A very, VERY valid question. It should as no shock to anyone that black women had to practically invent their own feminist movement due to the lack of representation, visibility, hell even ACKNOWLEDGEMENT within the larger (white) feminist movement. This is still happening amongst the feminist movement, glbt movement, shoot, I even read about a black, disabled, veterans movement. Even today, people of color still feel that too often people want our numbers and faces in the crowd, but won't let us near the seats of power, even in causes that directly impact our lives.

I think Ida B Wells would be an excellent addition. but perhaps the author of the piece felt she was a bit too well known? She did make it on a stamp back in the day, after all.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Fri Apr 12, 2013, 12:27 AM

5. Our history

 

We have to make and tell our own "History" because no one is going to tell it for us....
http://www.streamingchurchesonline.com/

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_Tires (Original post)

Sun Apr 21, 2013, 12:33 PM

6. Here's the thing . . .

anyone not a white male is basically ignored in history books.

Black feminists & White feminists get short shrift.

Along with:

Blacks in general.
Women in general.
Hispanics in general.
Native Americans. Irish. Italian. Asian. Jewish. Muslim. GLBT, atheists - basically anyone not considered "white enough" and "male enough" - nor "Christian" enough for that matter.

The few exceptions - "tokens" - being too great to completely ignore, though the writers of history (white males) would if they could.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread