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Wed Jan 23, 2013, 11:57 AM

How Millions of Farmers are Advancing Agriculture For Themselves

The world record yield for paddy rice production is not held by an agricultural research station or by a large-scale farmer from the United States, but by Sumant Kumar who has a farm of just two hectares in Darveshpura village in the state of Bihar in Northern India. His record yield of 22.4 tons per hectare, from a one-acre plot, was achieved with what is known as the System of Rice Intensification (SRI). To put his achievement in perspective, the average paddy yield worldwide is about 4 tons per hectare. Even with the use of fertilizer, average yields are usually not more than 8 tons.

Sumant Kumarís success was not a fluke. Four of his neighbors, using SRI methods, and all for the first time, matched or exceeded the previous world record from China, 19 tons per hectare. Moreover, they used only modest amounts of inorganic fertilizer and did not need chemical crop protection.

Using SRI methods, smallholding farmers in many countries are starting to get higher yields and greater productivity from their land, labor, seeds, water and capital, with their crops showing more resilience to the hazards of climate change (Thakur et al 2009; Zhao et al 2009).

These productivity gains have been achieved simply by changing the ways that farmers manage their plants, soil, water and nutrients.

lots more > http://independentsciencenews.org/un-sustainable-farming/how-millions-of-farmers-are-advancing-agriculture-for-themselves/

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Reply How Millions of Farmers are Advancing Agriculture For Themselves (Original post)
Viva_La_Revolution Jan 2013 OP
tama Jan 2013 #1
farminator3000 Feb 2013 #2
fasttense Mar 2013 #3
Viva_La_Revolution Mar 2013 #4
HealUS Dec 2013 #5

Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Original post)

Thu Jan 31, 2013, 04:03 AM

1. So

 

just basic common sense principles of organic gardening, simple as that.

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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Original post)

Fri Feb 8, 2013, 05:31 PM

2. here's a cool pdf from that link and TED talks for the snowstorm

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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Original post)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 07:04 AM

3. And a lot of very hard work

I notice later in the article it states that the system is very labor intensive.

I find that most organic gardening is very labor intensive especially when you are 1st setting up your garden.

I notice they mention giving each plant room to grow. I find that package labels for seeds are almost useless when it comes to spacing of vegetables. If my soil is poor (a newly developing garden plot) I plant further apart. If my soil is rich (an older garden plot with a lot of organic materials in it) I plant closer. The in row spacing on seeds packets is usually too close and the between row spacing is usually too far apart and allows weeds to invade and take over.

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Response to fasttense (Reply #3)

Tue Mar 5, 2013, 10:33 AM

4. I do the 4x? method

4 foot wide beds, so in a 12' bed I have 3 blocks of 4' or 4 blocks at 3' or at least 2x2 for each tomato plant. (that's in the good established beds)

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Response to fasttense (Reply #3)

Wed Dec 4, 2013, 12:37 PM

5. Low labor, High Yield Methods

Hey there, FastTense!

If it helps, one easy way to grow lots of food with very little labor is the
Kratky Method where you basically, set your plant roots a hydroponic
solution with an air-pocket at the top of the roots so they still get air.

It's a "set it and forget it" way to go - no weeds and since the roots
can get at the nutrients easily, you end up with a lot of food quite quickly.
Here's a link with an example:


Have fun!

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