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Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:12 AM

Question

I know virtually nothing about guns, so I figured I'd ask here. I have a friend who thought that making trigger locks a part of gun safety legislation could be a good idea. She was thinking about having them required and registered, or something like that. I asked her how they worked and if they were tamper-proof, etc. She really knew very little about them either, so I said I'd look into it.
So anyway, if you have a moment or two, I'd appreciate if you could educate me about them. I'll pass the info on to her.

19 replies, 1971 views

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 09:42 AM

1. Some modern guns have a safety lock built in.

I have three pistols that have such a lock. The lock requires a special key. In the locked position, it can't be fired. In the unlocked position it is a standard gun. Here is a close up of a Bersa Thunderer .380 with lock.

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 10:07 AM

2. Trigger locks are oftens sold with the gun

The last few guns I've bought, both rifles and pistols have come with a trigger lock in the box with them. In fact, I think all the Smith & Wesson revolvers now come with an integral trigger lock as standard equipment.

In some areas the police offer free trigger locks for the asking, as a safety measure.

The problem is having people actually use them.

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 10:33 AM

3. reading fingerprints

I remember reading there was talk about having a fingerprint reader on guns. Only the person whose fingerprints were stored could shoot the gun.

I worked at a Day Hab Center for mentally impaired adults, and we had to place our fingers on the reader for the door to unlock. Yes, all employees had to be fingerprinted for background checks in order to with this population.

Do they have this technology for guns?

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Response to HockeyMom (Reply #3)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 10:37 AM

5. They are working on it, but there are some logistical difficulties

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Response to HockeyMom (Reply #3)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 11:29 AM

7. Significant technical issues with that approach

Probably unsolvable at a practical level

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Response to HockeyMom (Reply #3)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 01:20 PM

12. If it is developed, I'll use it.

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 10:36 AM

4. Every new firearm I've bought has come with a lock of some kind


Some were internal or integral with a key that renders the gun inoperable (like this Taurus revolver)



But most were cable locks like this:

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 11:01 AM

6. It looks like the key is fairly generic...not specific to each firearm like a door key...

would be to a specific door lock. So a trigger lock key would work with many trigger locks? Would that be accurate?

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 11:49 AM

8. Hate 'em.

Any time you put your trust in a mechanical device to keep you safe, well, you aren't too terribly safe. If you keep to The Four Rules and store your firearms in such a way as to prevent unauthorized access then you are pretty much good to go. Relying on a trigger lock to do your thinking for you is just inviting trouble. A cable lock through the action is a more secure method, especially if you lock it down to an immovable object.

I know folks who use trigger locks on loaded weapons. So when they go to remove the lock they are messing with the trigger area of a loaded weapon. That is a clear violation of The Four Rules. That is the basis for my dislike for them but it goes deeper than that. Never trust a mechanical safety device on a firearm.

I am a pretty strong advocate of using proper storage for firearms not in use. I don't have much use for folks who leave them lying about "just in case".

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 12:01 PM

9. I love it when ....

 

... People who admit that they know next to nothing about a subject start advocating legislation about it.

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Response to oldhippie (Reply #9)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 01:11 PM

11. Yet the same person comes...

to those knowledgeable on the subject for input.

We, who have the knowledge, should educate such a person, fairly and without bias, about the pros and cons of what they suggest.

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Response to sarisataka (Reply #11)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 02:22 PM

15. This is true, and I'm glad the poster did this ...

 

.... it's the ones that don't try to learn, and sometimes even refuse to listen, that bug me.

I didn't mean to disparage the poster, but maybe his friend a wee bit.

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Response to oldhippie (Reply #9)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 01:28 PM

13. Good point, but this is a respectful, good faith inquiry.

The dinky licks & such are of little value except for point-of-sale security. I think good, personalized security will come about. High-grade metal is still used in guns, and this is where any device can be imbedded. Failure of such may be corrected/disabled by manfacturer. This in the Shapes of Things to Come!

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Response to Eleanors38 (Reply #13)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 02:25 PM

16. Yes, it seems that it was ....

 

As stated above, I didn't mean to disparage the OP, just a general complaint about people who try to regulate things they know nothing about. The old "it seems like a good idea" thing has tripped up many a person, including me.

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Response to oldhippie (Reply #16)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 02:40 PM

17. From one ol' hippie to another, I understand.

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Response to oldhippie (Reply #9)

Sat Dec 22, 2012, 01:46 AM

18. I assure you that was not my intent...

This is your safe haven for discussion and I respect that. I truly did come just for information. I came here a long time ago for advice about what type of rifle would be best for me to buy for target shooting, and I remembered how helpful everyone was, and so I came again.
My friend brought the subject up to me because she knew I had a rifle, and so thought I might know something about trigger locks. As you suggested, her interest is from a legislative standpoint, and I agree with you...those who know nothing, should not be the ones making such major decisions. All that accomplishes is a bunch of laws that don't do anything but tick people off, and fail to solve whatever problem you're trying to address. The information I learn here will help me to educate her.

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 01:07 PM

10. Safety locks are good, but not so much trigger locks.

External trigger locks are basically clam shells that fit over the trigger guard with the locking devise running through the trigger guard to hold it in place.

As with most external locks, they are relatively easy to defeat. They are intended to keep your little kids from getting access to a working gun, not so much for the adult thieves. The biggest problem with trigger locks is that because the lock runs through the trigger guard, it can press the trigger and cause an accidental shooting if the gun is left loaded. In that regard cable locks are far better in that you can run the cable through the breach and magazine well so that the gun cannot be loaded at all.

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Fri Dec 21, 2012, 01:41 PM

14. Decent personalized disabling tech. and locks are not here yet...

My Dad bought a new H & R target revolver. A spiral-type lock was built into the grip, and operated by key. It worked to lock & unlock the entire double action. Trouble is, it damaged the mechanism (according to some smiths), and the piece miss-fired repeatedly.

I solved it! I disabled the entire gun, and now wait for a gun "buy back" in my area; $50 in groceries is worth than the gun.

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Response to livvy (Original post)

Sat Dec 22, 2012, 02:05 AM

19. Thank you, everyone, for your help.

I very much appreciate all your input. I have a much better understanding of the different types of safety locks and how and in what circumstances they are most useful.
Thanks again for taking the time to help.

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