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Mon Nov 26, 2012, 10:48 AM

Confiscated weapons = Guns for sale

Nearly 15 years after Kentucky passed a law requiring state police to collect guns seized around the state and auction them off to buy equipment for police departments, debate over its impact continues. Attitudes of some critics of the law have changed, though.

Police chiefs, once the most vocal in opposition to the move, have warmed to it after it helped raise more than $7 million for bulletproof vests and other equipment for their departments.

Other officials and national gun watchdog groups, however, continue to voice concerns that the program makes available more cheap guns that find their way into the hands of criminals.

Weapons auctioned by Kentucky State Police to licensed gun dealers totaled 3,200 last year and will exceed 4,000 this year. They include a variety of pistols, rifles and shotguns, large-caliber weapons and even an occasional assault weapon like the AR-15 – the same type of weapon the Colorado theater shooter used to injure 58 people and kill 10 last July.

http://nky.cincinnati.com/article/AB/20121125/NEWS0107/311250022/

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Arrow 13 replies Author Time Post
Reply Confiscated weapons = Guns for sale (Original post)
SecularMotion Nov 2012 OP
slackmaster Nov 2012 #1
4th law of robotics Nov 2012 #4
SecularMotion Nov 2012 #5
rrneck Nov 2012 #6
4th law of robotics Nov 2012 #7
Clames Nov 2012 #8
glacierbay Nov 2012 #9
gejohnston Nov 2012 #10
gejohnston Nov 2012 #2
Eleanors38 Nov 2012 #3
ileus Nov 2012 #11
Jenoch Nov 2012 #12
Atypical Liberal Nov 2012 #13

Response to SecularMotion (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 10:50 AM

1. If the guns are sold to dealers as the story says, people who buy them from the dealers...

 

...are subjected to background checks.

Other officials and national gun watchdog groups, however, continue to voice concerns that the program makes available more cheap guns that find their way into the hands of criminals.

Bull-pucky.

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Response to slackmaster (Reply #1)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:30 PM

4. These claims are often made with not even a thought towards providing evidence

 

They should study the effect these resold guns have on crime.

They won't because they already know the answer.

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Response to 4th law of robotics (Reply #4)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:34 PM

5. Did you read the article?

Sanders, self-described as “very pro-Second Amendment,” says the auctions make it easier for the weapons to end up being used in future crimes. National studies back his claim. Though tracking more than just auctioned guns, a 2010 study by the national advocacy group Mayors Against Illegal Guns found that weapons sold in Kentucky are associated with crimes throughout the country at a high rate. The study found Kentucky exported more crime guns across state lines than all but two other states – Mississippi and West Virginia. Ohio recovered 239 crime guns that were traced back to Kentucky, while Tennessee found 188 Kentucky guns connected to crimes. “Criminals have very easy access to guns these days, and we’re making it easier,” said Sanders. “I’m pro-gun. I’m a member of the NRA. There are few places I go where I’m not armed, but I’m not for making it easier for criminals to arm themselves.”

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Response to SecularMotion (Reply #5)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:37 PM

6. Are the guns at these auctions among those

that wind up as crime guns?

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Response to SecularMotion (Reply #5)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:38 PM

7. Associated with, at a high rate

 

No significance values, no magnitude.

Oh and ask from a studyby people with an admitted bias.

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Response to SecularMotion (Reply #5)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:43 PM

8. Did you?

 

What specific study supports this notion? MAIG packaged "study" certainly doesn't. There is absolutely nothing to support to notion that these weapons are more or less likely to wind up in criminal hands. Nothing.

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Response to SecularMotion (Reply #5)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:46 PM

9. How does this make it easier for criminals to get these guns?

 

They're auctioned off to gun dealers who have to do background checks on the buyer of these guns.
This article doesn't make any sense at all, criminals don't generally go into gun stores and attempt to purchase a firearms.

And, c'mon, MAIG? MAIG has convicted felons as members.
This article is pure crap.

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Response to SecularMotion (Reply #5)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:52 PM

10. because people move from Kentucky

before getting guns stolen. The traces only go as far as the last FFL, and the ATF knocking on doors. As for MAIG's study, it is an advocacy group. I don't believe any study done by advocacy groups and doubt most from ideological think tanks.

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Response to SecularMotion (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:06 PM

2. so does Wyoming and a lot of

places. You would be amazed how many Walther PPs in .32 showed up in US pawn shops and gun shows because the police forces of, what was then, Federal German Republic (West Germany) sold them as surplus on the civilian market.

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Response to SecularMotion (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 12:24 PM

3. "Concerns" about confiscated weapons ending up

In the hands of criminals are unsubstantiated fears. An occasional medium-powered semi-auto rifle confiscated is important how?

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Response to SecularMotion (Original post)

Mon Nov 26, 2012, 01:06 PM

11. My brother bought a truckload from the county several years back.

Almost 250 total. He sold them for parts over a period of a couple of years, made a nice little chunk of change.

Funniest thing was him driving away with a truck bed loaded full of firearms. LOL

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Response to SecularMotion (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 01:11 AM

12. The State of Minnesota

auctions off guns confiscated by DNR conservation officers once every couple of years. They only auction off long guns however. The auction is open to the public and it is handled the same as if the gun were purchased from a gun dealer (the auctioneer has FFL). I bought a Winchester blind box .30-06 for $175 a few years ago. Now, there are just to many people attending the auction to get a good deal. Sometimes it seemed as if there were a few guys paying way too much to buy a particular rifle. That's because they were buying back their own gun that was taken away for one reason or another (repeated deer baiting for example).

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Response to SecularMotion (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 09:46 AM

13. Guns are sold to dealers, who must run NICS checks on subsequent buyers.

 

"Weapons auctioned by Kentucky State Police to licensed gun dealers totaled 3,200 last year and will exceed 4,000 this year. "

This means that Kentucky is selling these confiscated firearms to federally-licensed gun dealers. When FFL dealers sell firearms to individuals, they must run a NICS background check on the buyer.



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