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Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:10 PM

(Parrot) So I'm in a 7-11 and this ad catches my eye

For an African Grey with a large cage with a price of $600.

I've always been fascinated with parrots, and I'm thinking about calling, but I'm not sure if I can give this bird all it needs as I have a harsh commute and during the week I generally only have about 3 hours of time at home when I'm not sleeping although there are others around.

I would be a total novice (although I did try to rescue a cockatoo who was plucking long ago) so hints, tips and opinions would be appreciated. Assuming the bird appears healthy and happy, what else do I look for when I meet the bird?

This may actually be moot, the bird may be gone by the time I call, but still I think I'm getting to where I need a critter back in my life.

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Reply (Parrot) So I'm in a 7-11 and this ad catches my eye (Original post)
hootinholler Nov 2012 OP
elleng Nov 2012 #1
haele Nov 2012 #2
cyberspirit Nov 2012 #3

Response to hootinholler (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 01:59 PM

1. Sounds neat, hoot,

I understand your need. Also understand that African Greys are very smart. Have no more info for you, but please keep us informed!

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Response to hootinholler (Original post)

Tue Nov 20, 2012, 02:49 PM

2. African Greys bond very strongly to one person and need a lot of attention.

They're also very smart - probably the smartest of the parrots and need a lot of stimulating activity around them.
I've seen too many that were "gotten rid of" because they began to get loud and neurotic from boredom and frustration - the owners thought they wanted a smart pet, but didn't really realize they needed to pay as much attention to the parrot as they would a eternally four or five year old child.

Storytime - (I'm an old lady with a lot of memories)
Back in the '90's, our shop logistics manager had gotten permission to keep his African Grey in his office during working hours after his divorce, because he couldn't find "day care" for his feather-baby that was part of his family for over 15 years, and couldn't stand to think what it would do to her if he got rid of her. He kept one of those large round cages with lots of toys in the corner for her where she could see the door and out the interior window at the rest of the shop floor where we did pre-fab and QA work.
The bird had learned that he was going to return whenever he left the office - especially since we could hear her asking where he was going before he walked out the door; I think that is why she never screamed while he would leave the building for meetings or surveys. He would put her on a bird leash so he could have her safely ride on his handlebars when he biked back and forth to work.

They are great birds, but they need a lot of work, and they live a long, long time.
The issue I would have would be the potential betrayal factor - once the bird begins to trust you and think of you as a member of it's flock, you can't just give it away when it becomes inconvenient to continue the bond with your bird the way nature intended that bird to bond.

Haele

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Response to hootinholler (Original post)

Thu Nov 22, 2012, 07:05 PM

3. Parrots are very high maintenance.

How about a cat?

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