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Fri Jul 12, 2013, 07:49 AM

Over-the-Counter Medications That Are Safe for Dogs (And How Much to Give!)


While veterinary care, lots of love, and a healthy lifestyle is the absolute best way to keep your pet feeling great, all dogs will experience at least some form of injury or illness in their lifetime. Did you know that there are many over-the-counter human medications that can be safe and effective for dogs, when used correctly?

Benadryl, or another branded antihistamine, can be incredibly useful for treating allergies, bug bites, or other causes of itchy skin. Buffered aspirin is an excellent anti-inflammatory and pain reliever. Even Dramamine can be used for dogs with motion sickness, and Immodium can treat diarrhea. However, dosages for dogs are much different than for humans.

Use the chart below to determine if your OTC medication is dog (and cat) safe and how much should be administered. Always check with your veterinarian that understands your pet’s health and history before giving any medications. Additionally, be certain that you’re using only the medication listed, not other ingredients. Many antihistamines, for example, include added decongestants that can be lethal for your dog. Check labels very carefully and when in doubt, don’t use.




http://dogingtonpost.com/over-the-counter-medications-that-are-safe-for-dogs-and-how-much-to-give/#.Ud8U8m1ujPV

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Over-the-Counter Medications That Are Safe for Dogs (And How Much to Give!) (Original post)
DainBramaged Jul 2013 OP
sinkingfeeling Jul 2013 #1
ginnyinWI Jul 2013 #2
2theleft Jul 2013 #3
siligut Jul 2013 #4
Phentex Jul 2013 #5
intheflow Jul 2013 #6
IrishAyes Jul 2013 #7
orleans Jul 2013 #8
DainBramaged Jul 2013 #9

Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 09:08 AM

1. I have that chart already. I've used many of those with my dogs.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 10:16 AM

2. bookmarked. thanks nt

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 12:02 PM

3. also bookmarked

thanks for the post!

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 12:35 PM

4. My father's Chow developed mouth warts when he was a puppy

He was the sweetest little guy in the whole world and he and dad were BFFs. Dad was an engineer and brilliant, but didn't know much about disease. I know human care and loved that little dog too. Knowing that warts are caused by a virus, I gave him 100 mgs of Vitamin C a day for 2 days and the warts disappeared. I had to split up a tablet to do this and then place it into his mouth, he didn't appreciate the taste but he was so sweet and gentle, he let me do it.

I thought of this when reading the story about the rabbit with warts. Vitamin C is acidic and when I gave it to the dog I was aware of this and that is why I gave just a small dose. I just wonder if feeding the rabbit, tomatoes or oranges would help.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 04:25 PM

5. Buffered aspirin is the only thing I've ever given. My neighbor used ADVIL!!

and made her dog really sick! I would never think of giving a dog Advil.

We only gave Bufferin after the vet recommended it for my dog when we were camping once and he hurt himself.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri Jul 12, 2013, 11:52 PM

6. I want to add manuka honey for kennel cough.

Any honey is good to help sooth a dog's throat and natural antibodies, but the manuka honey from New Zealand has antibacterial properties. When Bear got kennel cough a couple months ago, and then our other dog, Honey (name coincidence!) also started coughing, we gave them this honey twice a day. The cough was gone from them both in about 10 days. As I said, though, it's expensive; we only had some because my S.O. found some on a dumpster diving mission not long before. Still, I think the throat-soothing alone probably helped the dogs sleep through the night, valuable rest which no doubt contributed greatly to their recovery. Even if we don't have the good stuff if they the cough again, they'll still be getting some kind of honey as treatment.

http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/11_10/features/Kennel-Cough-Remedies_16067-1.html

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Tue Jul 16, 2013, 06:24 PM

7. I use a lot of long-proven home remedies

But a person can never learn too much about such things.

For instance, a weak solution of vinegar and water can work as a flea spray.

Witch hazel is good for bug bites or any inflammation, used only externally of course.

Finally, if you ever suspect your dog's been poisoned and seconds count, force plain salt down its throat. That will cause the dog to throw up. We don't always have time to wait for a vet.

This being summer reminds me also, if you think Fido's overheating and you want to run COOL water from the hose over him, be sure to start at the feet and slowly work upward. They lose a lot of heat through their back, and suddlenly dowsing him there can be fatal. True with horses, too. I had to learn a lot of bush doctoring because my little ranch was 5 miles down a dirt road, and even on the highway it was 50 miles to the nearest vet.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Sun Jul 21, 2013, 03:32 AM

8. friend's vet told them to give their dog tylenol for stiffness

i suggested cosequin or rejuvenate.

years ago our vet told us to give our dog baby aspirin

why is tylenol bad for dogs?

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Response to orleans (Reply #8)

Sun Jul 21, 2013, 07:44 AM

9. Same reason it really is bad for us, liver damage

The effects of acetaminophen poisoning are quite serious, often causing non-repairable liver damage. Dogs will typically experience acetaminophen toxicity at over 75 mg per kg body weight. The most common symptoms that you may notice in pets suffering from acetaminophen toxicity include:



•Brownish-gray colored gums
•Labored breathing
•Swollen face, neck or limbs
•Hypothermia (reduced body temperature)
•Vomiting
•Jaundice (yellowish color to skin, whites of eyes), due to liver damage
•Coma


http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/digestive/c_dg_acetaminophen_toxicity

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