HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Recreation » Gardening (Group) » what's your favorite bean...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Thu Nov 8, 2012, 10:13 PM

what's your favorite bean?

we plan to focus on growing beans next year, as our hugelkulture will need the nitrogen for a year or 2. so we are looking for interesting and tasty beans that we can seed save.
will probably do a teenie bit of the three sisters thing and tuck in a couple melons and squash, but to run and shade out the weeds. suggestions for that welcome also.
xposted in cooking

21 replies, 1886 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 21 replies Author Time Post
Reply what's your favorite bean? (Original post)
mopinko Nov 2012 OP
Skittles Nov 2012 #1
Tanuki Nov 2012 #2
femmocrat Nov 2012 #3
Tanuki Nov 2012 #4
Kaleva Nov 2012 #5
femmocrat Nov 2012 #8
Curmudgeoness Nov 2012 #6
mopinko Nov 2012 #7
Agony Nov 2012 #15
mopinko Dec 2012 #16
Agony Dec 2012 #17
mopinko Dec 2012 #18
Agony Dec 2012 #19
Shagbark Hickory Nov 2012 #9
Kolesar Nov 2012 #10
mopinko Nov 2012 #11
beac Nov 2012 #12
mopinko Nov 2012 #13
beac Nov 2012 #14
bvar22 Dec 2012 #20
Kolesar Dec 2012 #21

Response to mopinko (Original post)

Thu Nov 8, 2012, 10:17 PM

1. has-bean


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Thu Nov 8, 2012, 10:32 PM

2. The half-runner is the go-to bean for this purpose in my home region,

but I suppose it depends on where you live. Here is a little bit about the half-runner:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/39686/

You can definitely plant it "three sisters" style. My uncle used to plant it along with a field corn that he had milled into corn meal, and let the half runners trail up the cornstalks while they were both growing. My grandmother and aunt would "can" the beans in glass jars and we ate them all winter. I have nice memories of summer evenings on my granny's porch, helping to snap and de-string the beans.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Thu Nov 8, 2012, 10:41 PM

3. Nothing exotic... I just like green beans.

They are easy to grow, prolific producers, and I can easily freeze enough for the entire winter. (I buy new seeds every year.)

I don't know what the "three-sisters thing" means, though. I always plant cantaloupes and pumpkins near the beans... is that the same thing?



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to Tanuki (Reply #4)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 12:10 AM

5. Interesting! Never heard of that before.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Tanuki (Reply #4)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 10:09 PM

8. Very efficient!

I never have any luck with corn, though.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 07:27 PM

6. I have a new favorite bean I found this year

but I will have to figure out what it is. All I know is it was a purple bean, fat and tender. Too bad, it did turn green when cooked, but the flavor was wonderful, a mild and buttery taste. I had people looking at that bean with a lot of curiousity when I bought a basket. All I am sure of is that it was a heritage seed and the bean pod was purple.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Curmudgeoness (Reply #6)

Fri Nov 9, 2012, 09:51 PM

7. i've seen those. seemed liked an obvious pick.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Reply #7)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 08:30 PM

15. The purple podded one I grow

is Royal Burgundy Bush bean from Fedco seeds. It's a great reliable bean!

Don't forget to try some "Butterbeans" when you order from JohnnysSeeds. This is a fresh green soybean AKA edamame. also great for freezing after you blanch them and squeeze the beans out of the pod. or blanch and freeze them whole and squeeze them into your mouth for a winter treat!

think seeds!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Agony (Reply #15)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 11:54 AM

16. my kids love edimame.

got some butterbeans for them.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Reply #16)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 07:15 PM

17. Have you tried dry beans?

they take bit of room but there is nothing like tortillas with your own Cannellini beans! Black Turtle, Marfax, King of the Early, Kenearly, YinYang (beautiful), Tiger Eye and Calypso have all done well for us.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Agony (Reply #17)

Sat Dec 1, 2012, 10:23 PM

18. that's the plan. never had enough before, but

i will have a giant pile come august or so. i hope.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Reply #18)

Sun Dec 2, 2012, 10:23 AM

19. There are a couple of dry pole beans

if space is a premium. OK luck with Black Coco and Cranberry Pole varieties for more per square foot but the seeds are expensive. Nothing beats Cannellini for production volume in our soils. we need hundreds of row feet for a yearlong supply.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Sat Nov 10, 2012, 12:20 PM

9. Green. Hands down.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 04:47 PM

10. Rocdor yellow "wax beans"--Best beans ever

They are bush beans. Plant about 15 seeds per two weeks from late May until July for a continuous harvest. Available at Harris Seeds and Johnny's Seeds and other suppliers.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Kolesar (Reply #10)

Tue Nov 27, 2012, 10:27 PM

11. thanks. will try these, and

a few other things i found at johnny's.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Thu Nov 29, 2012, 06:08 PM

12. French Filet

Lovely, slim delicious beans. Great for cooking, roasting or picked small and chopped raw in salads.

http://www.territorialseed.com/category/182

NRaleighLiberal grew PURPLE ones last year that I've got on my "must do" list for next.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to beac (Reply #12)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 09:28 AM

13. i have grown those and i NEVER get them picked in time.

or there are too few to make a meal. they are tasty, but a pain.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Reply #13)

Fri Nov 30, 2012, 03:08 PM

14. I've had that same problem with sparse production but found that they tolerate

dense planting (aka eight plants to a pot) so that helps with getting enough in one picking for a meal.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Sun Dec 2, 2012, 12:54 PM

20. Field Peas?...Cow Peas?...Crowder Peas?...Now I know!.

Purple Hulls?.... BlackEyes?... Black Beans?
Every year, we devote more space to these delicious beans.

"In my youth in New Orleans (another time, another place), we regularly had a side dish called "Field Peas". They tasted somewhat like Black Eyed Peas, but were smaller, crisper, and better tasting. I didn't really know what they were...I only remember that I liked them. I don't think I ever saw them on a menu, or in a store. I haven't eaten them for many years. After moving to Arkansas, I mentioned Field Peas to Starkraven, and she said she had never heard of them.

In late June, Starkraven surprised me with a package of "Field Peas" seeds she had found at the co-op. It turns out that "Field Peas" are a member of one of the largest family of peas called Southern/Cow Peas which has literally hundreds of varieties, some of which are Black Eyed Peas, Purple Hulled Peas, and Crowder Peas."





The plants are about two feet tall, and the pods are really cool. They grow from a little stalk above the plant body which makes them really easy to pick. They are perfect for the Late Summer transition to Fall. They seem to be very productive, and it looks like we will have plenty to dry for the Winter.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=246x9836


We don't plant them until July. They thrive in the heat of late Summer, and need only a little water.
They are called "Green Manure" because these plants actually take nitrogen from the air and return it to the soil.
Even if you don't like the beans, they make a great Cover Crop for late Summer.

Shelling the Peas takes some time, but after the shelling they can put on the shelf and used all Winter.

There is a modest difference in taste between the differing varieties, and we are now planting 3 - 4 different varieties every season.
Last season, after July, as we were cleaning up our garden from the Spring crops, we stagger planted a new section every two weeks to spread out the harvest.

The best tasting beans we grow here are regular old Green Beans.
We grow both the Pole and Bush types, but prefer the Bush.
They just seem to do a little better here lately.
We plant them in the Spring and grow enough the Can for the Winter,
but I had to tell you about the CowPeas.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mopinko (Original post)

Sat Dec 29, 2012, 08:34 AM

21. When you cook your beans, season them with cumin

Cumin is associated with refried beans and Mexican food, but I also use it on green beans. I will cook green beans with garlic, then toss them in a drizzle of olive oil and a tiny dash of cumin powder. Give it a try.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread