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Wed Nov 14, 2012, 10:42 AM

What is the best way to remove linoleum from a concrete slab?

I am pretty sure it is linoleum and not vinyl. I tried a square shovel but it was of little use. Is there something that can be mopped on that will penetrate and dissolve the glue? Would heating it help? I intend to get a proper scraper rather than the shovel.

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Reply What is the best way to remove linoleum from a concrete slab? (Original post)
tk2kewl Nov 2012 OP
Kali Nov 2012 #1
tk2kewl Nov 2012 #2
Sedona Nov 2012 #3
tk2kewl Nov 2012 #4
beac Nov 2012 #5
katherinedresty Sep 2013 #6
gopiscrap Sep 2013 #7
Gov101 Sep 2013 #8
tk2kewl Sep 2013 #9

Response to tk2kewl (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 10:47 AM

1. try hot water

took up an old kitchen floor that was on wood, almost ruined the wood by trying to use a roof tile scraper - then while wiping up some of the debris, we noticed the adhesive was dissolving. it was some kind of starch based stuff, hard as rock but freaking dissolved with hot water!

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Response to Kali (Reply #1)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 10:49 AM

2. thanks for the tip

yahoo answers says heat gun helps too

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Response to tk2kewl (Original post)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 10:54 AM

3. Lucky you! I'm a flooring "expert"

Elbow grease and razor blades.

Go to a "flooring supply store" If you PM me your zip code I'll find you one near by.

What you want to ask for is a "stand up razor scraper" and a box of 8-10 inch blades.

They sell ones that are small that you use on your hands and knees with a 4 inch blade, but unless its a very small area your back and knees will be glad you spent a few bucks more on the "stand up" ten inch version.

Then scrape scrape scrape changing blades often. For heat you can try a blow dryer or rent a "heat gun"

You may even be able to rent the scraper.

DO NOT under any circumstances use "Something that can be mopped on that will penetrate and dissolve the glue" if you plan to adhere anything (even stain) to the floor anytime soon. It may not seem like it but concrete is very porous and anything that will dissolve the adhesive will prevent anything new from sticking to it.

If you plan a new floating floor, then go for the adhesive remover. Make sure you're well ventilated!

PLAN B: Find a flooring installer with the proper tools to send his apprentice over to do it. Expect to pay about $25 an hour for this depending on where you live.

On edit: Tip the apprentice, he's likely making $10 an hour or less.

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Response to Sedona (Reply #3)

Wed Nov 14, 2012, 11:00 AM

4. great, thanks

this is a Sandy flood damaged home. I removed carpet from the other rooms and plan on tiling throughout after removing the kitchen floor. flexbond thinset is my preferred method for tiling. is there anything i need to do to prep the slab after removing the linoleum?

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Response to tk2kewl (Original post)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 10:47 PM

5. Heat gun and scraper.

I had to do that exact job in our old house. The heat gun makes it 1000% easier. Just be sure to have an old towel (folded up) or something else non-meltable that you can rest the hot gun on while it cools and you scrape b/c heatings.

FYI, I bought a pretty cheap heat gun at the hardware store. Doesn't need to be fancy, just hot.

Good luck!

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Response to tk2kewl (Original post)

Fri Sep 13, 2013, 03:50 AM

6. Its works great

 

Last edited Tue Sep 24, 2013, 05:43 AM - Edit history (1)

I used heat gum method for my old kitchen, it really works but I found it quite difficult as I am not used to with such kinda concreting stuffs.

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Response to katherinedresty (Reply #6)

Fri Sep 13, 2013, 10:19 AM

7. Welcome to DU

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Response to tk2kewl (Original post)

Sun Sep 15, 2013, 04:48 PM

8. The 4" razor scraper is the easiest and fastest.

I just did this in the kitchen recently and I tried a bunch of things first but when I finally broke down and got a $6 razor scraper designed specifically for this job, it turned to to actually not be that bad and a lot faster actually than the hot water or chemicals or belt sander methods I had previously tried. Gotta get the kind with the replaceable 5" razor blades.

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Response to tk2kewl (Original post)

Mon Sep 16, 2013, 10:59 AM

9. It was very difficult to remove everything from the slab, even with the best razor scraper

i had to use a citrus-based solvent to soften the glue otherwise the flooring surface scraped off but left the glue behind.

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