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Wed Feb 27, 2013, 12:25 PM

Did you ever underbake a loaf of bread? Is there a way to fix this?

Occasionally I'll take a loaf of bread out of the oven too soon. It's only after I slice into the loaf that I find out that the middle is still unbaked. Is there any way to repair this?

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Reply Did you ever underbake a loaf of bread? Is there a way to fix this? (Original post)
hedgehog Feb 2013 OP
kentauros Feb 2013 #1
sinkingfeeling Feb 2013 #2
hedgehog Feb 2013 #7
pinto Feb 2013 #3
cbayer Feb 2013 #4
Major Nikon Feb 2013 #5
locks Feb 2013 #6
bif Feb 2013 #8
Warpy Feb 2013 #9
noamnety Mar 2013 #10

Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 12:31 PM

1. You can't fix it that I'm aware of.

If you still want to save the bread, best thing to do would be slice it lengthwise, and cut out the unbaked portion.

I've been having some problems with this happening with the 5-Minute Artisan bread recipe. All I can figure is that my yeast isn't fresh enough any longer (I keep it in the freezer, yet I know it's well over two years old.) The last loaf I made I suspect the yeast was completely flat because the small loaf still didn't rise all over. I'm staling the slices now so I can make bread pudding out of it instead

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 12:33 PM

2. I think the only thing to do is to slice and toast or use in something else that will

be cooked/baked a second time.

P.S. Did you let the bread cool before you cut into it? Hot bread will look mushy in the center, but is fine after cooling.

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 02:47 PM

7. Thank you! I think that's exactly what I did!

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 12:52 PM

3. Cube and throw into soup as a thickener?

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 01:02 PM

4. I think just use the fully cooked crust.

I might use that part for croutons or for fondue, but I would probably ditch the rest. It's going to go bad in a hurry anyway.

Also, I know you probably know this, but never cut a loaf when it's still hot. That will inevitably lead to under baked bread.

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 01:34 PM

5. You can rebake it

If you already have a brown crust then you'd want to use a lower baking temp like 300F or so. Supermarkets actually sell pre-baked bread that you finish in the oven so it gets baked twice. You might wind up with bread that is too dry, but it's worth a shot.

If you don't already have one, invest in an instant read thermometer. Works great with bread for testing internal doneness.

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 02:08 PM

6. Don't fix it

How about french toast or bread pudding? If not, the birds and squirrels will love it.

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 03:44 PM

8. Best way to test it

to see if it's done is turn it upside down and tap on it. If it sounds hollow, it's done.

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Wed Feb 27, 2013, 08:12 PM

9. You can use the done parts for croutons

or slice it, bake it in the oven sliced, and use for bread crumbs.

The best thing to do is take the bread out of the pan and thump the bottom. You'll be able to tell which are done and which are not by the thump. Done sounds hollow, raw sounds dull.

Also consider lowering your oven temperature if the outside is getting nice and brown while the inside is still raw. The oven too hot is usually the reason for underdone bread.

Oh, and don't cut into it until it's cool, no matter how hungry you are. Bread finishes cooking outside the oven. If you slice into it while it's hot, the middle will be gummy.

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Fri Mar 1, 2013, 05:14 PM

10. I use a probe thermometer for consistency.

I got tired of guessing when the bread was done, and ruining loaves by over or undercooking them.

Correct Bread Temperatures
Enriched rolls: 185F to 190F
Enriched sandwich bread: 205F
Lean rustic or hearth breads, such no-knead bread: 205F to 210F

http://www.thekitchn.com/perfect-bread-use-your-thermom-40644

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