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Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:12 AM

Oatmeal - I hate it but I'm gonna have to eat it

Just found out that my bad cholesterol is high and my good cholesterol is low. I've been vegetarian since I was 16 (42 now), I don't eat butter, I don't drink milk (I use soy or almond milk), I use extra virgin olive oil when I saute, I eat a lot of garlic... point is, I have to start incorporating even more good cholesterol foods into my diet and one of those is oatmeal. I have food issues when it comes to texture and oatmeal is one of those foods I can't stand because of the texture. Is there a good replacement or a way to make it better?

Any tips would be appreciated.

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Reply Oatmeal - I hate it but I'm gonna have to eat it (Original post)
justiceischeap Feb 2013 OP
LibGranny Feb 2013 #1
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #5
Viva_La_Revolution Feb 2013 #10
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #15
Viva_La_Revolution Feb 2013 #23
PADemD Feb 2013 #2
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #6
Neoma Feb 2013 #8
PADemD Feb 2013 #20
intheflow Feb 2013 #9
daleanime Feb 2013 #3
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #4
Viva_La_Revolution Feb 2013 #12
Sedona Feb 2013 #7
KC Feb 2013 #36
Sedona Feb 2013 #45
hibbing Feb 2013 #55
LancetChick Feb 2013 #11
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #13
bif Feb 2013 #14
bif Feb 2013 #16
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #17
beac Feb 2013 #63
dixiegrrrrl Feb 2013 #18
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #19
Lex Feb 2013 #21
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #25
beac Feb 2013 #64
bif Feb 2013 #22
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #24
KC Feb 2013 #37
GoCubsGo Feb 2013 #53
LancetChick Feb 2013 #54
siligut Feb 2013 #26
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #29
GoCubsGo Feb 2013 #27
Gormy Cuss Feb 2013 #28
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #30
KC Feb 2013 #38
Gormy Cuss Feb 2013 #40
Nay Feb 2013 #51
woodsprite Feb 2013 #31
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #32
woodsprite Feb 2013 #33
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #34
Lucinda Feb 2013 #35
Mira Feb 2013 #39
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #41
Mira Feb 2013 #43
surrealAmerican Feb 2013 #42
Callalily Feb 2013 #44
Major Nikon Feb 2013 #47
Tab Feb 2013 #46
Warpy Feb 2013 #48
japple Feb 2013 #49
Nay Feb 2013 #50
noamnety Feb 2013 #52
sad-cafe Feb 2013 #56
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #59
AmBlue Feb 2013 #57
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #60
AmBlue Feb 2013 #67
MiddleFingerMom Feb 2013 #58
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #61
MiddleFingerMom Feb 2013 #62
guardian Feb 2013 #65
womanofthehills Feb 2013 #66

Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:22 AM

1. I enjoy oatmeal but I add

walnuts or pecans to mine, along with chopped apples or blueberries or raisins. I sweeten with brown sugar and it's delicious. Don't eat the instant - it is awful - cook it.

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Response to LibGranny (Reply #1)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:36 AM

5. Thanks for the tip.

Maybe that's why I don't like it, it's just so mushy.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #5)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:26 AM

10. not the one-minute stuff either

I buy bulk organic raw oats at Winco for very cheap. You'd have to cook them way too long to get them mushy

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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Reply #10)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:50 AM

15. What about oatmeal cookies?

Would they have the same effect?

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #15)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:09 PM

23. absolutely

Use good oats and 100% Whole Wheat flour. the oat bran absorbs the bad cholesterol and the Wheat germ will move it thru your system faster.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:23 AM

2. Eat Granola instead

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Response to PADemD (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:36 AM

6. Thanks for the substitute suggestion.

Is granola as hearth-healthy as oatmeal?

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:51 AM

8. Granola has A LOT of sugar in it.

Makes me drowsy.

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Response to Neoma (Reply #8)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 11:50 AM

20. Make your own granola

Then you can control the amount and type of sugar.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:54 AM

9. They're pretty much the same food.

Just prepared differently. Oatmeal is cooked oats. Granola is (usually) oats rolled together with things like honey, nuts and fruits. One is plain the other is jazzed up. The big drawback of granola vis-a-vis oatmeal is that granola has more calories because of additional ingredients, but since you're looking to make your oatmeal more palatable, you'd be adding other ingredients to it anyway, so six of one, half dozen of the other.

Edited to add: you can control the calories/sugar content in granola by making your own to contain ingredient portions.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:28 AM

3. Once upon a time...

I would reheat left over oatmeal by frying slices. Don't know if that would help or not.

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Response to daleanime (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:35 AM

4. I was specifically told to stay away from frying

though I don't fry much of anything.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:31 AM

12. replace that olive oil with coconut

Olive oil becomes bad for you when heated to much, like frying or sauteing.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:45 AM

7. Put peanut/almond butter in it

OMG! its awesome!

Gonna go make some now.

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Response to Sedona (Reply #7)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:04 PM

36. Hmm I

never thought about putting that in it. I will have to try it. You put that in after its cooked,right?

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Response to KC (Reply #36)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 07:53 PM

45. Yep, it gets all melty yummy


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Response to Sedona (Reply #45)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 01:02 AM

55. Second the peanut butter...also note on consistency

Hi,
I like a little peanut butter in mine too, just a little goes a long way. I also sometimes add raisins or some honey.
In terms of consistency, I don't add much water to mine so it is very very thick. A spoon stuck in it stays standing.

Good luck with it. I found it to be an acquired taste, and now actually don't mind it. I started eating it for the cholesterol reduction factor too.

Peace

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:29 AM

11. You need wine.

Red wine. You could also take Resveratrol supplements, which contain the same antioxidants as red wine and promote good cholesterol over bad. And if you really must go the oatmeal route, try the steel cut oats, which are not rolled, but are oat grains cut into 2-3 pieces. Toast them in a skillet and boil with water and a little salt like rolled oats, and add your favorite toppings. They have a nutty bite rather than glue-iness.

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Response to LancetChick (Reply #11)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:48 AM

13. I've considered red wine but

I suffer from depression too so I try not to drink, since alcohol is a depressant. That said, the supplements could be a solution to that.

On edit:
Steel cut oats are the only kind I can stomach.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:49 AM

14. Mix in a little bit of yogurt

It makes it tolerable.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:51 AM

16. Fish oil pills are supposed to help

Not with the oatmeal. But they're supposed to lower cholesterol.

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Response to bif (Reply #16)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:54 AM

17. Yeah but the fish oil kinda poses a dilemma to my vegetarian diet

If I absolutely have to add that as a supplement to better my health, I will but I want to try other options first.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #17)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 11:15 AM

63. Flax seed oil.

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-990-FLAXSEED%20OIL.aspx?activeIngredientId=990&activeIngredientName=FLAXSEED%20OIL


And, FWIW, I make my oatmeal really thick (prevents that icky whey-looking watery-ness) and eat it with salt and pepper instead of sugar.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 11:38 AM

18. Oat meal does not have to be mushy.

Mr. D's cholesterol was 204, his doc was pushing statins, which Mr.Dixie wisely refused, and his cholesterol dropped to 170 in 6 months, by adding the oatmeal AND by his eating baby carrots, apples, celery and popcorn for munchies at night.So he was getting lots of fiber.

He cooks minute oats in less water than is usually called for, so it is not mushy, but firm, then adds cinnamon and a dash of nutmeg, does not use milk.
Me, I use a bit of milk and sugar and cinnamon and nutmeg.
I have also taken raisins, put them in a cup of very hot water, let them soak till they swelled and added to oatmeal.

There are always oatmeal cookies, if you prefer, but they should be home made. Depends if sugar is a problem or not.



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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Reply #18)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 11:48 AM

19. I was hoping Oatmeal cookies could be an answer

I don't think sugar is an issue but I won't know for another 3 months when I go back to be retested. I really hope to get a handle on this with foods instead of drugs.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #19)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 11:53 AM

21. Eat less sugar and it will help.

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20100420/high-sugar-diet-linked-lower-good-cholesterol

Eat more natural fats like the ones found in avocado and coconut.

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Response to Lex (Reply #21)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:41 PM

25. Yeah, I really need to give up my Pepsi

I've now cut down to 1 8oz can a day but I also tend to have sugared ice-tea throughout the day at work.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #25)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 11:21 AM

64. Yogi Tea's Mexican Sweet Chili helped me kick a

six-pack-a-day+ Diet Pepsi habit several years ago. It's got that flavor "kick" that plain water and regular tea lack.

(I think they might be calling it "Aztec Sweet Chili" in some markets now. )

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 11:56 AM

22. Here's a funny story for you...

At my last job, one day I was in the lunchroom. The janitor was mixing up some breakfast. He cooked up a bowl of oatmeal, then added a couple pats of butter, a bunch of sugar and some half and half. I made a comment like, "That's a big breakfast." He said, "Yeah, I'm trying to lower my cholesterol!"

Some folks are just clueless.

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Response to bif (Reply #22)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:39 PM

24. It's like someone who orders a fast food meal and then gets diet soda

It's not like that diet soda is going to negate the fast food meal they're about to eat.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #24)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:11 PM

37. Usually I

would agree with you about the diet drinks but I gave up drinking cokes etc but sometimes I just have to have something bubbly to drink and I have gotten so used to diet ones that I can't stand a real coke now, they are just soooo sweet. Same with tea. I get unsweetened with lemon and use Splenda sometimes.

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Response to KC (Reply #37)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 10:05 AM

53. That's how I feel about it, too.

Not that I eat that much fast food. When I do, it's usually something like Subway's lower-fat sandwiches. So, I sure as heck don't want to top that off with a big cup of liquid sugar. I'm like you. I'm so used to Diet Coke, I can't drink the regular kind. Here in the South, we have "sweet" tea, which gags me from the amount of sugar it has in it. If I go for iced tea, I go for the non-sweetened form, too.

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Response to KC (Reply #37)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 11:31 AM

54. I'm with you on this too.

If I'm getting fast food I'm getting a diet soda with it. I can't imagine thinking that a diet soda would negate all the rest of the calories, but it certainly helps lower them overall!

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:43 PM

26. It sounds like you inherited your cholesterol numbers

Genes trump diet when it comes to cholesterol and heart disease. But you do have some control. Exercise is a big factor too.

Consider making granola with your oatmeal, you can add other good fiber too. Mr gut eats yogurt topped with granola for breakfast, the yogurt is also helpful as it makes for healthy intestinal flora.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/megans-granola/

Original recipe makes 30 servingsChange Servings
8 cups rolled oats
1 1/2 cups wheat germ
1 1/2 cups oat bran
1 cup sunflower seeds
1 cup finely chopped almonds
1 cup finely chopped pecans
1 cup finely chopped walnuts
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup maple syrup
3/4 cup honey
1 cup vegetable oil
1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
2 cups raisins or sweetened dried cranberries


Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment or aluminum foil.
Combine the oats, wheat germ, oat bran, sunflower seeds, almonds, pecans, and walnuts in a large bowl. Stir together the salt, brown sugar, maple syrup, honey, oil, cinnamon, and vanilla in a saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat, then pour over the dry ingredients, and stir to coat. Spread the mixture out evenly on the baking sheets.
Bake in the preheated oven until crispy and toasted, about 20 minutes. Stir once halfway through. Cool, then stir in the raisins or cranberries before storing in an airtight container.

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Response to siligut (Reply #26)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:43 PM

29. Unfortunately, I can't get into an exercise regimen just yet

At my physical they did an EKG and there were some abnormalities, so my PA doesn't want me to do anything physical until I see the cardiologist.

I'd guess you're right about the inherited bit. I've been pretty much on heart-healthy diets since I was a teen because of my parents needing to be on them. And like I said, I've been veg (and at times vegan) since I was 16. I've maybe "slipped" and eaten meat a total of a month (maybe two) in all that time. I've been grappling with whether or not to allow fish into my diet but I want to try and do this in other ways first.

Thanks for the recipe!

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 12:52 PM

27. Muesli, overnight oatmeal, and steel cut oats. And, exercise.

Muesli is a cold cereal made of toasted raw oats with fruit and nuts mixed in, Some recipes also include other cereal flakes, like corn flakes. You can make your own, or buy it pre-packaged.

Overnight oatmeal is one part old-fashioned oats, one part yogurt (non-dairy yogurt is fine), and one part milk (again, cow juice not necessary). Place them all in a jar, shake it, and refrigerate it overnight. You can also add fruit, nuts, coconut... I add ground flax seeds to mine. You could probably toast the oats here, too. I haven't tried it, I think I may the next time I make this.

Steel cut oats come out more chewy. They take longer to cook, but one can make them in a crock pot. Some of the thicker old-fashioned rolled oats, such as the ones from Bob's Red Mill, are kind of chewy, too.

If you want to raise your HDL (good cholesterol) levels, the best way to do that is through exercise. My cholesterol runs on the high side, as well, in great part because of genetics. But, my good cholesterol is way up there, and it's pretty much due to my daily trips to the gym.

On edit: I am a big fan of the Smart Balance products, which contain plant sterols, which lower LDL. Their margarine is supposedly vegan-friendly, and I really like their peanut butter.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:18 PM

28. Cookies, muffins, cakes, and breads are all ways to incorporate more oats into your diet.

Look for cookie and muffin recipes where you can use olive oil as the fat. For breads and cakes, grind the oats to a flour (or buy it if you can get it cheaply in bulk) and use it as a substitute for one quarter or less of the wheat flour.

You can also use oats as the binder in casseroles and veggie burgers. Just be aware that you'll have to adjust the seasoning a bit because oats are sweet.

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Response to Gormy Cuss (Reply #28)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:45 PM

30. All of my baked goods I make are vegan

so, that'll be easy to track down recipes with "healthier" ingredients. I love oatmeal cookies but can't stand cooked oatmeal and I'm actually a fan of good bran muffins, so those are all definitely things I'll start making.

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Response to Gormy Cuss (Reply #28)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:14 PM

38. Sometimes there

are recipes that you can add things like applesauce in place of fat. I've never tried it but others seem to like it cause it makes them moist.

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Response to KC (Reply #38)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:38 PM

40. Pureed stewed prunes can be used that way too.

Easy enough to make at home, too (see the bottom of the page
http://plums.islandz.info/preparation-cooking-tips/

I've used both applesauce and prune puree with good results.

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Response to Gormy Cuss (Reply #40)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 09:58 PM

51. You can use baby food prunes -- very easy to use. nt

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:49 PM

31. Fresh ground flax seed and oat bran are also good to incorporate

My MIL made sure she always had a good selection of oat bran breakfast muffins at the ready. That way if FIL wouldn't eat oatmeal in the morning, he got a good dose of the oat bran in his muffin he grabbed to go with him out the door.

I sprinkle fresh ground flax seed on anything that doesn't move. I especially love it on cottage cheese w/ a small handful of slivered almonds and a handful of blueberries. Flax has a nutty taste. To get the benefits out of it, you do have to grind it. I use a coffee grinder and do about 1/2 cup at a time. You can work your way up to using 3 tbls a day, but start with 1 tbls. If you jump up to 3 tbls from nothing, it can cause you to feel bloated and gassy. Same as with any high fiber food, so if you go that route, start slower until your system is used to it.

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Response to woodsprite (Reply #31)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:51 PM

32. We actually have ground flax seed in the freezer as I type

I'm going to look for a muffin recipe when I get back from an afternoon appt.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #32)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:53 PM

33. I think Mom used one from the American Heart Assoc. cookbook

It was sweetened with either bananas or applesauce.

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Response to woodsprite (Reply #33)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 02:07 PM

34. Since all the baking in the house is vegan-based

we also either use banana's or applesauce.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 02:32 PM

35. I make mine extra thick. Don't like it runny at all.

It takes all the slimy-esque nature away. But I do love the flavor.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:30 PM

39. I am not alone! I had a bad count too, really bad.

Two and a half weeks ago. And the doctor put me on statins immediately.
I said no. Then I started reading and talking to knowledgeable folks and here is what I'm doing:

I happen to like oatmeal. So I eat it in the morning. Regular, cooked. Not instant. With a little no fat milk, sugar and cinnamon. Makes me feel like a kid again. I'm the oldest of 7 and my dad fixed a huge pot of oatmeal every morning.
The fruit bowl is abundant and the fridge is full of vegetables.

Have not had a piece of cheese, a potato, any pasta, and only a half a loaf over time of sprouted grain whole wheat bread.

I decided to take the statins til the next blood drawing visit in about 4 weeks now, and also do the emergency diet, and get used to a good part of it. After that, no more statins. I have a friend, a doctor, who would kill me if I admitted to taking statins.

I have been really crabby, reading the food labels and other info - what a bore.
And I have a kid your age, and weigh 150.
Geez.
This is no fun.

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Response to Mira (Reply #39)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:40 PM

41. Wait, no pasta?!

what's wrong with pasta? It's got no cholesterol in it... (I know, just went to the store and read a bunch of boring labels!)

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #41)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 06:10 PM

43. I think everything that could "carry" cheese in it's pockets is a nonononono

I'm new to this which is evidenced by my levels being so high. I try to control carbs as well in my emergency diet.

quoting the internet

Pasta can raise your cholesterol if you eat too much of it, since being overweight can contribute to high cholesterol, according to MayoClinic.com. Pasta and pasta dishes, such as macaroni and cheese, lasagna and ravioli, are among the top sources of calories in the typical American diet, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A cup of cooked spaghetti provides 221 calories, and a full plate of pasta may contain several cups. Smaller portions help limit your calorie intake to prevent weight gain.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/519920-does-pasta-raise-your-cholesterol/#ixzz2KA7jXzUw

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:51 PM

42. Oats are oats, no matter how you cook them.

If you don't like the texture of oatmeal (I don't either), you can toast rolled oats to make granola, or you can cook "whole oats" in water or stock, the same way you would with any other grain. They take longer to cook than rice or barley, but about the same amount of time as "wheat berries" and the like. They make a good base for stir fries, or with a little honey and cinnamon, a good breakfast.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 06:53 PM

44. Here's a yummy recipe using steel oats!

Trust me . . . well worth the effort!

Apple Cinnamon Oatmeal

Serves 4

In order to reduce the active cooking time of the steel-cut oats (from 35 minutes to less than 10 minutes,) soak them overnight. This soaking requires some planning, but its well worth it. The oatmeal will continue to thicken as it cools. If you prefer a looser consistency, thin the oatmeal with boiling water.


3 cups water

1 cup steel-cut oats

teaspoon salt

cup apple cider

cup whole milk

cup grated Fuji apple

3 tablespoons dark brown sugar

teaspoon ground cinnamon

cup coarsely chopped walnuts, toasted


1. Bring water to boil in large saucepan over high heat. Remove pan from heat, stir in oats and salt. Cover pan and let stand overnight.


2. Stir cider, milk, apple, sugar, and cinnamon into oats. Bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally, until oats are softened but still retain some chew, and mixture thickens and resembles warm pudding, 4 to 6 minutes. Remove pan from heat and let stand 5 minutes. Stir and serve, sprinkling each serving with 2 tablespoons walnuts.

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Response to Callalily (Reply #44)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:31 PM

47. Steel cut oats have a bit different texture from rolled oats

I like them better.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 08:59 PM

46. I hated oatmeal

and I'm lactose intolerant and don't like milky things anyway.

I never liked the gummy kind of oatmeal.

What I found I really liked was rough oatmeal, specifically Silver Palate oatmeal



Cook it in water, and add pepper (pepper is key).

I can eat that.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 02:37 AM

48. Health food stores

have non sugared whole grain Cheerio clones, usually in bulk. Those are really quite good, you don't need the sugar.

I eat them out of hand as a snack since I'm lactose intolerant. They're crunchy and tasty.

You don't have to eat oatmeal to get your whole oats down.

Another tip is buzzing quick oats in a blender, powdering them. It's the trick vegans use for making creamy soup, powdered quick oats. It's just an example of how you can sneak them into things. They're good in breads and pancakes, too.

Oatmeal cookies are great, too, but I usually save those for when I'm traveling because they're high in fat and sugar.

Cooked pin oats are the best extender for scrapple, something made with odds an ends of meat, herbs and spices, steamed in a can, then sliced and fried like sausage. It's a great sausage alternative.

Once you start thinking outside that morning bowl of glop, I'm sure you'll come up with things on your own.

FWIW, I never learned to eat oatmeal. My mother ate it three times a day during the worst of the Depression and wouldn't allow it in the house.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 09:52 AM

49. Since I discovered coconut butter/oil, I've been eating a lot more oatmeal.

Some brands taste better than others. I've found that the organic, virgin oil is MUCH tastier. I use it in place of solid shortening or butter in baking. It has a nutty taste, feels wonderful on your tongue, and is great on oatmeal or toast. It tastes much cleaner than butter or margarine. I'm hooked on the stuff. Started using it after I watched a video on youtube about a doctor who started giving it to her husband to stave off alzheimers, but kept on using it because I love the taste.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 09:53 PM

50. I love oatmeal so I can't help you there, but a study a few years ago showed that if you eat

these foods daily, your cholesterol numbers will improve dramatically:

Eggplant
almonds
Benecol (or similar margarine with sterols)
oatmeal

Hope that helps!

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 03:11 AM

52. If you like smoothies

You can throw raw rolled oats into the blender along with the fruit and whatever else you put in. They'll get smashed up. No sticky gloppyness to force down.

I blew out my cholesterol last year and was in a high risk category. The day I got the test results I switched that day to oatmeal for breakfast instead of eggs, and 90 days later retook the test and it was optimal or ideal in all categories.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 01:20 AM

56. cookies?

 

would that help?

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Response to sad-cafe (Reply #56)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 07:32 AM

59. Yes, I love oatmeal cookies, just can't stand breakfast oatmeal. nt

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Mon Feb 11, 2013, 10:55 PM

57. McCann's Irish Steel Cut Oats - Recipes

http://www.mccanns.ie/recipes.html

Good recipes to choose from here. On the back side of the McCann's oatmeal can there is a very easy 5-minute microwave recipe for oatmeal that I use when I'm in a hurry. I add thick sliced banana or apples to the oatmeal while cooking, then after cooked I tossed in some fresh or frozen blueberries, brown sugar and Silk Coconut Milk... YUM!! It's so good I sometimes make it for dinner. You can also add nuts and raisins or whatever fruit you have on hand. Best oatmeal EVER.

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Response to AmBlue (Reply #57)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 07:33 AM

60. I prefer McCann's Irish Steel Cut

The texture is slightly better for me than Quaker oats.

Thanks for the link.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #60)

Sat Feb 23, 2013, 05:49 PM

67. You're welcome! :-)

I think their microwave recipe is the best quick and healthy oatmeal out there.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 01:38 AM

58. I top mine with, instead of milk, a little Carnation Non-Dairy Fat-Free French Vanilla...

.
.
.
... Coffee Creamer and fruit.
.
.
.

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Response to MiddleFingerMom (Reply #58)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 07:33 AM

61. I try to stay away from dairy, so it's almond milk for me. nt

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #61)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 08:29 AM

62. Sorry... I had always thought it was non-dairy. Pretty far down on its list of ingredient is this --

.
.
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... SODIUM CASEINATE (A MILK DERIVATIVE)*** (*** not a source of lactose).
(edited to add) It DOES have this in it -- PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED SOYBEAN
AND/OR COTTONSEED OIL** (**adds a trivial amount of fat). The fat grams are
listed as zero for all the types of fats normally listed.
.
Win if you avoid milk because of fat OR because you're lactose intolerant -- and
very, VERY rich and tasty -- I put a small amount on my breakfast cereals (cut
with regular milk).
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I tried almond milk once and was very disappointed -- not bad, but not as tasty
as it had promised (to me) to be.
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I also use uncooked oatmeal instead of breadcrumbs for recipes like meatloaf and
meatballs (or your non-meat equivalents).
.
.
.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 01:00 PM

65. Try steel cut oats

 

They have a different texture than regular oatmeal. They take a little longer to cook...about 30 minutes. But I think have better flavor and I like the texture better (not mushy). I usually buy either Bob's Red Mill or John McCann brand in the supermarket. They cost a little more but are worth it.

I like to eat with maple sugar or a little honey.

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Response to justiceischeap (Original post)

Wed Feb 13, 2013, 01:40 AM

66. I like Oat Bran better than Oatmeal


I like Arrowhead Mills Organic Oat Bran. I think it tastes way better than oatmeal. Beans are also supposed to lower cholesterol. My triglycerides and HDL were great but my LDL was high. I won't take drugs because of the side effects so I'm trying all kinds of things like - losing weight, diet change, supplements (pantethine & time release niacin) Some people have had success with red yeast rice, but Niacin did it for my friend.

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