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Wed Feb 6, 2013, 04:07 PM

The role of protein?

In weight loss? In resistance training? In muscle gain, strength training.

Alas, I'm trying very hard to put all of the pieces of a great training regimen together, but still feel like I'm fucking it up. And lately, since the New Year, I feel like I'm losing momentum with both weight loss and strength gain. I still have "compliance issues" with things, like getting enough sleep, taking the recommended supplements. At least I've never missed a group session or an individual session. I know some of the slowdown is simply because I'm not getting in those great, long 15-20-25 mile daily or almost daily cycling sessions.

I thought it would be good to start a new thread, rather than take over the breakfast thread.

I'm really ignorant on this. I know my RD thinks I should be eating something like 140-160 grams a day, but frankly I'm lucky to get half. I just am so not into meat these days, and I go "blech" to the protein shakes a lot of days, even though I should.

Now, if I could live on bananas, blueberries, salads, avocados, and nuts I'd be a happy boy. But, that won't cut it.

So, any experts on protein, and any advice on what I really should do? I would pester the RD again, but frankly, after 4 hours of consultation, I doubt she can really offer me much more insight.

13 replies, 1110 views

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Arrow 13 replies Author Time Post
Reply The role of protein? (Original post)
Denninmi Feb 2013 OP
bike man Feb 2013 #1
wildeyed Feb 2013 #2
noamnety Feb 2013 #3
Joseph125 Feb 2013 #4
BadgerKid Feb 2013 #5
reyes.brayden Jul 2013 #6
Emiliajarmon Sep 2013 #7
coucouza Oct 2013 #8
mljuboja Oct 2013 #9
gopiscrap Oct 2013 #10
Name removed Nov 2013 #11
Name removed Dec 2013 #12
Portland Cyclist Mar 28 #13

Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:16 PM

1. There are any number of googleable sites that deal with exercise vs carb/prot/fat ratio.

 

I try to maintain approx 20 - 21 percent of my daily caloric intake as fat, about 30% as protein, and the rest carbohydrate. For the most part I am successful.

I am 70, was recently measured at 16% body fat (although at 195 lbs the BMI chart is not kind to me). I lift weights 5 days a week, eat about 1700 calories/day, and consume about 124 ounces of fluids (includes the water in various food products), no sodas or other sugar beverages. I use a computer food journal and enter every morsel that passes my lips.

This works for me. YMMV

edited again. using DietPower 4.4, just finished the journal for today

total calorie intake 1488

fat 30.7 g (19%)
prot 137 g (37%)
carb 166 g (44%)
117 oz fluid, which includes the fluids in the various food items as well as beverages.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 05:22 PM

2. I do a small amount of protein with every snack or meal.

I also eat carbs low on the glycemic index, mostly fruit, veg, beans and moderate amounts of whole grain.

Your body can only process a certain amount of protein at one time, so eating a set amount each day isn't that helpful. It is better to have small doses all day. Cheese and nuts count if you are only eating a small snack or meal. I usually have meat, eggs or beans with larger meals.

The carbs low on the GI, combined with the protein and a bit of fat, will keep you satisfied for longer with fewer calories. And your body will have a continuous supply of protien to build muscles with.

Look for new protien smoothie recipes or try a different type. In my experience, whey powder is most palatable. Combined with fruit and almond milk or water, it can be quite tasty.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 11:07 PM

3. When I was in peak form

my rules came from the 4 Hour Body book, which was my bible for a few years. 20 grams of protein within the first hour of waking up was a major rule. I was happy eating eggs but blew up my cholesterol levels doing that. So now a typical breakfast is oatmeal with protein powder mixed in, or coffee with protein powder instead of cream. I hit that with a stick blender, otherwise it lumps up - especially if I'm using the cheap store brand. Occasionally I'll do a smoothie with avocado, banana, berries, and a scoop of protein powder - and maybe peanut butter or tahini.

My smoothie life changed drastically when I discovered a regular canning jar fits on my blender.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 11:24 AM

4. Protein foods

 

Protein play an important role to develop the body muscles and is mostly recommended for the muscles building.
It also an important role in fat burning and weight losing.
It reduce the weight and build the muscles by converting the fat into muscles.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Mon Feb 18, 2013, 05:09 PM

5. Having read stuff for years, here's my take FWIW.

Losing momentum? You may need time off physically and/or mentally, if you haven't had a break in several weeks. Or at least go easier for one week. The best training happens cyclically, not linearly.

Your situation make me think: you're pretty active, so you'll need to intake a little more protein than someone who's inactive. How much depends on how much lean mass you have. That could mean anywhere from 1 gram of protein per pound (of lean body mass) if you've got a lot of bodyfat, to 1.5-2 grams if you're low on bodyfat. The rationale is two-fold: 1) as you get leaner, the fuel mix your body burns will slightly shift towards protein and away from fat; 2) active people use more muscles, break down more muscles, etc., than idle people, so you need to intake more protein.

My recommendation is to track down Lyle McDonald's books for straight-up no BS. There are several other competent authors, too. You can search out the bodybuilder forums, but it may take more time to find the gold nuggets.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Thu Jul 11, 2013, 04:46 AM

6. Re:The role of protein?

The amount of quality protein in your diet is the single most important calorie that influences your metabolic rate, favorably influencing weight loss. Quality protein also helps you sustain muscle during weight loss, improve muscle fitness, immunity, and antioxidant function, build HDL Cholesterol, and enhance insulin and leptin function all of which contribute toward optimal weight management efforts over time.

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Fri Sep 6, 2013, 03:35 AM

7. Protein

Protein is a essential part of our diet it helps in weight management whether you want to gain or lose weight, Dietary proteins play a crucial role in both muscle and bone maintenance,

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Tue Oct 1, 2013, 08:48 AM

8. the role of protein

Protein is absolutely necessary for building muscle and boosting the rate at which the body burns stored fat. In fact, the only way to build lean muscle mass is by eating sufficient quantities of protein. On the other hand, insufficient protein intake equals loss of muscle mass, a slowed metabolism, and an increase in the body's propensity to store fat. The more muscle mass

In terms of weight loss, protein is extremely helpful for stabilizing our blood sugar and keeping our body in check with what it actually needs instead of bringing us to a binge state. It can help repair damaged muscles and in that same respect, help the muscle burn more fat. Some foods that contain a significant amount of protein include nuts, beans, legumes, meat, and eggs. The most important thing to consider when eating a protein-rich diet is to choose lean proteins and limit protein foods with significantly high "bad" fat content (i.e. saturated fats, trans fats, etc.).



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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 12:41 PM

9. Proteins

Proteins are very important molecules in our cells. They are involved in virtually all cell functions. Each protein within the body has a specific function. Some proteins are involved in structural support, while others are involved in bodily movement, or in defense against germs. Proteins vary in structure as well as function. They are constructed from a set of 20 amino acids and have distinct three-dimensional shapes.Anyway you need to understand that there are different types of proteins.Check wiki for more

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Response to mljuboja (Reply #9)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 02:02 PM

10. welcome to DU

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Response to Denninmi (Original post)

Fri Mar 28, 2014, 04:16 PM

13. A palm-sized piece of meat..

daily is what I remember Dr. Oz recommending. I personally go bicycling for ~15 miles weekly and this seems to be enough for me.

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