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Thu Feb 21, 2013, 10:15 AM

Thyroid discussion.. cause I'm going in for the blood test today, symptoms started 6 years ago

I'm really very excited and happy. I'm pretty sure 90% of my symptoms are from low thyroid, and when I called this new doctor to make an appointment, they automatically scheduled me for both tests, I didn't even have to ask! One point for the new doc already

I want to make sure I remember every symptom, and I'm kind of curious what symptoms others have, and are you on Synthroid or Generic? My mom's thyroid completely crashed when she was about 30, she was on a generic that she couldn't absorb at all and went into a Myopic coma. I think I'm going to insist on the Synthroid even though it's more expensive..

My symptoms
First noticed 6 years ago - Arms falling asleep when over my head for more than a minute, even when sleeping prone. Feet would fall asleep if I tied my shoes too tight.
Shaky hands (this was not helpful as I was an interior finish painter) I started having trouble making a straight line.
gradually the muscle pains started, like somebody was jabbing me with the eraser end of a pencil, deep in my leg and arm muscles
2010 - extreme muscle pain, just walking up 2 flights at a brisk pace, my leg muscles felt like they were screaming for oxygen, or I had just run twice around a track (I never was much of an athlete) Morning temp 2 degrees lower than normal, and if I did try to exercise enough to build up a sweat, it felt like my heart was freaking out. I'm cold all the freaking time too, even at 70 degrees.
2011 started daily kelp, and it's helped a lot keeping my temp up enough that I can function without wearing layers of long johns and sweatshirts.
My hands still don't work well though, I drop things cause I can't really feel them, and my fine handywork isn't so fricking fine anymore.

anybody wanna compare symptoms?

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Reply Thyroid discussion.. cause I'm going in for the blood test today, symptoms started 6 years ago (Original post)
Viva_La_Revolution Feb 2013 OP
hedgehog Feb 2013 #1
Viva_La_Revolution Feb 2013 #2
hedgehog Feb 2013 #3
Viva_La_Revolution Feb 2013 #4
hedgehog Feb 2013 #5
kathysart_decoration Apr 2013 #6

Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 02:24 PM

1. You can go down a lot of rabbit holes comparing symptoms.

I think the most important thing is to work with a doctor who will listen to you. Don't try to diagnose yourself, but give the doctor all the information you have.

I stick to Synthroid myself because I was getting ups and downs on the generic, but now I wonder if that was the result of autoimmune flares.

Speaking of autoimmune - thyroid problems can often be associated with that grand family of conditions.


If you go on Synthroid - it takes about 6-8 weeks for things to settle. Expect some ups and downs and expect to titrate the dose.

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Response to hedgehog (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 04:59 PM

2. there's something to that auto-immune thing

I also have arthritis, had gum disease, adult acne..

I just got back and he seems wonderful, except he didn't believe I could be having muscle pains and extremity tingling, he's worried it's something else. My mom had the exact same symptoms though, so I'm not worried.

I'll get the results back Monday, and he said if I'm anywhere near the low end of the curve, he'll prescribe Synthroid. (My mom went into Myopic coma while on a generic that her body didn't absorb) In a future visit I hope to change to desiccated powder, but will start with the synthetic and see how it works.

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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Reply #2)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 10:27 PM

3. Don't be afraid to ask for bloodwork to eliminate vitamin deficiencies

Be polite but persistent.

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Response to hedgehog (Reply #3)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 10:31 PM

4. I just popped a B12

we'll see how I feel in the morning

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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Reply #4)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 10:33 PM

5. B12 and Vitamin D are common deficiencies.

Good luck! Hope you get some good answers soon!

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Response to Viva_La_Revolution (Original post)

Tue Apr 2, 2013, 05:21 PM

6. Make certain you're getting all the tests you need

I am 37 years post total thyroidectomy for cancer, so I have been on medication for all these years. I like to think I know a thing or 2, but you may be getting plenty of advice already.
I only want to say that you should be certain you are getting not only the TSH, but also a Free T4 AND, very importantly, a Free T3 test. Doctors so rarely do that FT3 part and it is actually very important. I won't go into explanations, it may be more helpful to "do the google," as George W would say. It has taken me way too many years to understand the importance of that test.
Yes, I was on Synthroid for most of those 37 years, but I am now on Armour (a natural, not synthetic drug,) plus I take a T3 supplement called Cynomel (because it comes from Mexico) and I can't afford the American version called Cytomel. You have to work your way through this.
When I had my cancer 37 years ago there wasn't an internet or books. Now you can go to the library or a bookstore or Amazon and there are almost too many books. If I had those available to me way back then my life would probably have turned out differently. Thyroid problems can really mess you up. Arm yourself with information before you ever talk to your doctor. Also, depending on the outcome of your tests you should probably ask about antibody tests to look for things like Hashimoto disease. Don't know what kind of doctor you are working with, but it is probably best to start out with an expert in all things thyroid. Basic internists don't always keep up with these things.
Most importantly, never forget to ask for a hardcopy of your test results. Another thing I learned the hard way. Then, get some of those books on thyroid info and look up test result info. Know what the results are telling you and don't ever rely on your doctor to do that.
Don't mean to be preachy. I learned these things the hard way. You don't have to. Look at the books now or start online and you can easily get symptom information.
Best of luck.

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