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Thu Jan 17, 2013, 01:08 AM

Some With Autism Diagnosis Can Overcome Symptoms, Study Finds.

Doctors have long believed that disabling autistic disorders last a lifetime, but a new study has found that some children who exhibit signature symptoms of the disorder recover completely.

The study, posted online on Wednesday by the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, is the largest to date of such extraordinary cases and is likely to alter the way that scientists and parents think and talk about autism, experts said.

Researchers on Wednesday cautioned against false hope. The findings suggest that the so-called autism spectrum contains a small but significant group who make big improvements in behavioral therapy for unknown, perhaps biological reasons, but that most children show much smaller gains. Doctors have no way to predict which children will do well.

Researchers have long known that between 1 and 20 percent of children given an autism diagnosis no longer qualify for one a few years or more later. They have suspected that in most cases the diagnosis was mistaken; the rate of autism diagnosis has ballooned over the past two decades, and some research suggests that it has been loosely applied.

The new study should put some of that skepticism to rest.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/17/health/some-with-autism-diagnosis-can-recover-study-finds.html?hp

15 replies, 2050 views

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Reply Some With Autism Diagnosis Can Overcome Symptoms, Study Finds. (Original post)
elleng Jan 2013 OP
kickysnana Jan 2013 #1
elleng Jan 2013 #2
KamaAina Jan 2013 #3
nolabels Jan 2013 #4
mzteris Feb 2013 #5
KamaAina Feb 2013 #6
mzteris Feb 2013 #9
KamaAina Feb 2013 #10
mzteris Feb 2013 #12
KamaAina Feb 2013 #13
mzteris Feb 2013 #14
hunter Mar 2013 #15
CerebralDreams Feb 2013 #7
elleng Feb 2013 #8
KamaAina Feb 2013 #11

Response to elleng (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 11:28 AM

1. If this were anywhere but America this would be good news.

Here that means that the insurance company is free to give only the least amount of therapy it took to help anyone and since sometimes what looks like one thing is not you will find yourself getting three treatments.

How do I know. Since the beginning of time it took 6 weeks of strong antibiotic therapy to cure spirochetal disease. You can knock down some the symptoms with less treatment and then it can go dormant and come back later when the immune system is compromised. So for Lyme the current IDS guidelines are one antibiotic pill for a tick attached over 24 hours. If you don't get that treatment and become symptomatic AND test positive for Lyme (only 33% of people who have Lyme test positive) then you get 2 weeks. If you argue you can get two more weeks but are labeled Munchhausen, or pill seeking and everyone treats you like a problem before you open your mouth.

To think we used to be 1st in health care not that long ago. Thanks Reagan, Bush, etc, etc.

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Response to kickysnana (Reply #1)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 11:54 AM

2. Right, similar kind of thing here:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/11426700
Fortunately govt decided only one med. person has to say 'it helps,' to require continued therapy, but this is a new approach, and many have suffered prior.

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Thu Jan 17, 2013, 12:25 PM

3. Or, we learn how to fake being neurotypical

I, for instance, can "pass" pretty easily, except when having a meltdown.

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #3)

Fri Jan 18, 2013, 02:59 PM

4. More like neurobrainwashed

Mostly a lot the same here. Kind of taxing sometimes to put the mimic on but many times it's better to go through the door than trying to go around it.

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #3)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 11:24 AM

5. well, it did say "overcome"

not "cure".

My son - and probably most likely myself - are on the aspie spectrum. As he's aged, you wouldn't know it probably if you met him.

Though it seems as I've turned the corner from middle age to - um older - it seems like I'm becoming MORE aspie again. Or maybe I just don't give a damn about fitting in anymore. lol

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Response to mzteris (Reply #5)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 10:37 PM

6. One "overcomes" oppression, not symptoms

as in "We Shall...."

You seem to have done quite nicely at it! I never would have guessed. Welcome to the club! <3

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #6)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 10:04 AM

9. lol - you've never met me in person.

The anonymity of the keyboard works wonders.

I'm also pretty good at faking "normal" under non-stressed circumstances. Bottom line, I think I prefer to be alone - though sometimes I hate being ALONE - it's just easier, though.

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Response to mzteris (Reply #9)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 04:07 PM

10. More's the pity.

If you're ever in San Jose...

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #10)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 04:17 PM

12. Do you know the way to San Jose

I've been away so long. I may go wrong and lose my way. . .

well, I've never been. But I used to love that song. Dionne Warwick. Burt Bacharach.

But if I ever get out thatta way, I'll certainly let you know!

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Response to mzteris (Reply #12)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 08:25 PM

13. Did you know? Burt Bacharach's daughter Nikki was Autistic.

Sadly, she killed herself, right when she was around my age . Her dad has more money than God. If he couldn't find a place for her...

Where are you? Even Californians get around now and again.

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #13)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 11:54 PM

14. I had no idea about his daughter.

Did he know? I mean, that was such a different time. Even if he "knew" he didn't really know.

IMO it's those on the spectrum that makes advances in the world. Nts ... Well ... They're just normal. Not exceptional. Not visionary. Just boring sameness.

That sounds harsh and I'm sure not true across the board, but... Without autistics and aspires and the highly and profoundly gifted, mankind would never have even found fire. However, I'm not hg or pg maybe a ltlle more than average, but thats all. Nothing special.


Currently in WI. Probably at least four more years. Then, who knows? I only know it'll be someplace gd warm!

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Response to KamaAina (Reply #3)

Thu Mar 14, 2013, 01:57 AM

15. Exactly where I've been.

I get tired of faking it, tired of "passing."

I'm too old for that crap.

I can feel the "meltdowns" coming, but our society believes everyone wants to dance.

So I dance until I can't anymore.

Over and over and over again.

Arranging my life so I'm comfortable is hard work. Settling on the meds that help me is hard work.

I have "disabled" autistic relatives who are supported by family and government and I don't want to be them, but I do get tired of this dance that does nothing for me.

One of my relatives lived alone in a small apartment paid for by relatives, never got married, never had a job, got food stamps and walked to the grocery store every other day. Her sister bought her clothes and she wore them in a random mix-and-match way. Her world was very small. Maybe she would have blossomed if she'd lived to see the internet or a world that was more accepting of highly unusual women. I don't know.

But I don't want to be her, or some of my dad's relatives. I'd rather be my rocket-scientist eccentric grandfather, but without the all the pain he suffered trying to fit in, trying to be "normal."

My dad did okay, the worst of this stuff seems to skip generations, or maybe my dad was born to a more fortunate situation. But I do my best.


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Response to elleng (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:46 AM

7. We sometimes learn to act normal.

I actually started off looking normal - it wasn't until family troubles set me off in first grade, that my autistic symptoms really took off. Since then we've learned a lot about it, and I've learned to act normal. When I get stressed, or frustrated, the symptoms of autism can come right back out - to a level plainly visible by anyone with even a mild knowledge of autism and Asperger's.

I think that's what happened with a lot of these kids - the autism didn't go away, but they worked on neurotypical behaviors enough that those behaviors became second nature - that's sort of what happened with me.

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Response to CerebralDreams (Reply #7)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 12:55 AM

8. Thanks for the info.

Welcome to DU.

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Response to CerebralDreams (Reply #7)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 04:15 PM

11. "Why be normal?"

Actual magnet on the fridge at my office.

We usually refer to everyone else as "neurotypical" (NT) or "allistic" (the opposite of "autistic").

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