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Fri Jan 20, 2012, 12:09 PM

A Gut Check for Many Ailments

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204468004577164732944974356.html?KEYWORDS=gut+check+for+many+ailments

(...)
A growing body of research shows the gut affects bodily functions far beyond digestion. Studies have shown intriguing links from the gut's health to bone formation, learning and memory and even conditions including Parkinson's disease. Recent research found disruptions to the stomach or intestinal bacteria can prompt depression and anxiety—at least in lab rats.
(...)
The gut—considered as a single digestive organ that includes the esophagus, stomach and intestines—has its own nervous system that allows it to operate independently from the brain.
(...)
In a study of 23 autistic children and nine typically developing kids, a bacterium unique to the intestines of those with autism called Sutterella was discovered.

The results, published online in the journal mBio by researchers at Columbia's school of public health, need to be studied further, but suggest Sutterella may be important in understanding the link between autism and digestive ailments, the authors wrote.
(...)

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply A Gut Check for Many Ailments (Original post)
Why Syzygy Jan 2012 OP
MineralMan Jan 2012 #1
Why Syzygy Jan 2012 #2
MineralMan Jan 2012 #3
Warpy Jan 2012 #4
Why Syzygy Jan 2012 #5
Celebration Jan 2012 #7
Tumbulu Jan 2012 #6
martyparty Jan 2012 #8
Why Syzygy Jan 2012 #9

Response to Why Syzygy (Original post)

Fri Jan 20, 2012, 12:48 PM

1. It's certainly an area that can be researched.

I don't think anything can really be said at this point beyond that.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 20, 2012, 01:03 PM

2. Read

the article. It says more than, "can be researched". It is reporting RESEARCH.

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Response to Why Syzygy (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 20, 2012, 01:12 PM

3. I did read the article, thanks.

The research it reported on is preliminary stuff. As I said, it's an area to be researched. There is nothing in that article that talks about conclusive research of any kind. Just preliminary stuff that suggests that there might be a connection. Further research will be needed before any helpful conclusions can be drawn.

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Response to Why Syzygy (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 20, 2012, 01:32 PM

4. The operative word is "preliminary."

It means a sample was small and that the findings can't be extrapolated to a larger group because the real research on the subject hasn't been done yet.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #4)

Fri Jan 20, 2012, 01:39 PM

5. Understood

The most interesting part of the article is not in dispute. It is.

The gut—considered as a single digestive organ that includes the esophagus, stomach and intestines—has its own nervous system that allows it to operate independently from the brain.

This enteric nervous system is known among researchers as the "gut brain." It controls organs including the pancreas and gall bladder via nerve connections. Hormones and neurotransmitters generated in the gut interact with organs such as the lungs and heart.

Like the brain and spinal cord, the gut is filled with nerve cells. The small intestine alone has 100 million neurons, roughly equal to the amount found in the spinal cord, says Michael Gershon, a professor at Columbia University.

The vagus nerve, which stretches down from the brainstem, is the main conduit between the brain and gut. But the gut doesn't just take orders from the brain.

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Response to Why Syzygy (Reply #5)

Fri Jan 20, 2012, 03:00 PM

7. Funny story!

So I told my grandson that a little part of his brain was in his tummy. He laughed and said that was silly. I told him not to tell his teachers because even though I knew it was true, his teachers wouldn't know it. He's pretty talkative and that would have come up for sure and I didn't want him getting into an argument with his teachers. So he told his mom, my daughter. My daughter told him that he must have misunderstood because the brain was only in the head.

Anyway, I loved talking to him about signals in the brain and how it works to control things.

Oh, yes, I told my daughter YES THERE IS A SEPERATE PART OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM IN THE GUT! I had to actually look up the Scientific American article for her.

A really good friend of mine cured, yes, completely cured Type 2 diabetes by addressing her gut issues. And it had nothing to do with weight loss or limiting carbs. She followed a book called The Body Ecology diet. I had to listen to her talk about things like kefir, and stuff I never had heard of. She had had gut issues since she was a child, and when those cleared up the high blood sugars became normal.

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Response to Why Syzygy (Original post)

Fri Jan 20, 2012, 02:15 PM

6. so interesting....

When my sheep die and I look at their bodies, such a gigantic proportion of their mass is associate with this system. Now of course they are ruminants- big and little fermentation vessels throughout their torso......but the connection of this system to the other organs is fascinating to me.

I did not realize that there was a separate nervous system.

Thanks for posting the link.



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Response to Why Syzygy (Original post)

Thu Jan 26, 2012, 04:14 AM

8. Further reading on gut and Gershon

I found a recently published book on Amazon called "What's Behind Your Belly Button?" that is worth reading if interested in the subject of the gut and how it affects your health. Sort of interesting because it discusses educating yourself and children about the gut response and its intelligence, as well as how the medical discoveries relate to psychology. Can be found at [link:http://careerstorefront.angelfire.com|

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Response to martyparty (Reply #8)

Thu Jan 26, 2012, 03:12 PM

9. That looks good!

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