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Tue Jan 29, 2013, 02:48 PM

Gov't paying medical providers to go digital, screw ups follow

My doctor's office and now our local hospital are computerizing their medical records.
Complete with screw ups.
So I poked around the web to find out why the sudden urge to put my medical records into a gov't system.
And this is what I found:
The Medicare EHR Incentive Program

The Medicare EHR Incentive Program provides incentive payments to eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and CAHs that demonstrate meaningful use of certified EHR technology.
Eligible professionals can receive up to $44,000 over five years under the Medicare EHR Incentive Program. There's an additional incentive for eligible professionals who provide services in a Health Professional Shortage Area (HSPA).To get the maximum incentive payment, Medicare eligible professionals must begin participation by 2012.

http://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/index.html?redirect=/ehrincentiveprograms/

The results?

My local doc sent my prescription off to Walgreen's, a pharmacy we have refused to use, instread of the pharmacy I use. Took 2 days to straighten that out.

Yesterday, I went to the local hospital for a follow up test, and had to "register" again, they denied having any registration information about me despite my first visit 6 months ago. Which they had managed to bill Medicare for.
Turns out they have me listed as
being born in 1975 ..despite the fact I am on Medicare insurance.
being disabled...which I am not
being a Baptist...which I am not
living at a different address that I do
and having my last name spelled differently.
PLUS
they were insistent I give them my middle name and my maiden name ( both of which i r
The scary thing is not even the registration supervisor could tell me why this record was so fucked up, and she denied that I had registered 6 months ago for the first procedure even tho the hospital had billed Medicare for it.
She also had no clue where the recorded information went to ( obviously it goes to Medicare, to bill for the service).

I sat there, pondering how many incorrect records are now hibernating in how many agency and government computers, having been sent by people who had no clue as to why they were collecting and filing incorrect data.



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Reply Gov't paying medical providers to go digital, screw ups follow (Original post)
dixiegrrrrl Jan 2013 OP
sinkingfeeling Jan 2013 #1
dixiegrrrrl Jan 2013 #6
southernyankeebelle Jan 2013 #2
dgibby Jan 2013 #3
dixiegrrrrl Jan 2013 #8
cbayer Jan 2013 #4
hedgehog Jan 2013 #7
hedgehog Jan 2013 #5

Response to dixiegrrrrl (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 02:53 PM

1. Wow, I live in Arkansas and my many doctors and hospital have had electronic

records for years.

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #1)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 03:28 PM

6. Tiny rural town here.

Apparently just getting on board with EHR system. ( Electronic Health Records).
Hell, just getting on board with computers, actually.
Many people here have computers but lack even the most basic understanding of how to do anything but type on them.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 03:07 PM

2. You can't blame the government for what your local hospitals and drs offices do.

 

The information is only as good as the person who is putting the information in the computer. I will tell you this much. Back in 1995 when I worked at the VA Hospital in TN. All the offices and clinics and even the pharmacy was connected. You could type up a name on the computer and you can see everything that is on the patient and even the medications he/she is on. That is invaluable because as we get older we forget to tell the doctor everything. I know that my local pharmacy and the express scripts can both see what my medications are. These things are very important especially if a person ends up in an emergency room and unable to speak. What I have done because I am on so many medications I type my doctors name and his field he is in and then the medications he gives me. I have one sheet with each dr and medications they give me. I update every so often because it changes sometimes. Then when I go to my doctors appointment or a new doctor instead of having to write ea drug I just hand it to the nurse. It saves time.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 03:21 PM

3. As a retired RN,

I would strongly urge you to make an appointment with the hospital administrator. Also, I would notify Medicare, especially if the hospital isn't willing to talk to you, and I'd let the hospital know that's what I intended to do. If it's happening to you, it's happening to everyone else, too.

As for digitalized records, I love them. If they're done correctly, the cut down on misinformation, mistakes, etc. The Navy and VA have been using them for years. Sure did make my job easier, and now I can access my records easily for my civilian Dr.

Good luck!

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Response to dgibby (Reply #3)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 03:33 PM

8. Great minds, dgibby..great minds.

I am retired Social Worker who has been in charge of QA at various times.
Actually, I did just call the hospital Medical Records person and found her to be a very sharp person, we had a good long talk about the problem and I do feel she is going to do prompt follow up.
Wish our town had more people like her.
I miss working with intelligent professionals...sigh.

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 03:22 PM

4. It's a nightmare because of the lack of uniformity.

There are many competing programs and they don't *talk* to each other very well.

The VA has the best system in the country, imo.

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Response to cbayer (Reply #4)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 03:28 PM

7. There's always a fuss when a government regulation or standard comes out,

but it would be nice if the various systems would talk to each other!

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Response to dixiegrrrrl (Original post)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 03:27 PM

5. My GP went electronic a few years back - no problems at all!

The huge Rheumatology practice just went electronic last April, and has had problems with the system running slow and crashing. The GP has always been computer savvy. I suspect he knew what he was buying, and the Rheumatology practice either had no idea what to buy and/or went cheap!

We spent over 2 months fighting with the company administering my employer's self insurance program. They kept flipping our plan from the local plant's version to the corporate version. The biggest problem was that the clerks had no information on their screens that would show what happened.

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