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Wed Jun 27, 2012, 07:14 AM

Low-Fat Diet After Weight Loss May Raise Risk Of Gain

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-06-26/low-fat-diet-after-weight-loss-may-raise-risk-of-gain.html

Eating a low-fat diet after losing weight may cause the pounds to return, according to research that recommends a low-glycemic diet, one that doesn’t cause spikes in blood sugar, for weight maintenance and total health.

A diet rich in vegetables, fruits and minimally processed grains that raise blood sugars slowly allowed the body to burn about 150 calories more a day than eating a diet low in fats, said David Ludwig, senior author of today’s study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. While a diet low in carbohydrates burned 325 calories more a day than the low-fat menu, it raised the risk of heart disease, the study found.

When people lose weight, their metabolism slows and allows the pounds to return, Ludwig said. Only one in six adults who are overweight or obese will maintain at least 10 percent of their weight loss for one year, the authors wrote. Today’s findings show that eating a low-glycemic diet -- food that doesn’t cause blood sugar to surge and crash between meals -- is best for health and long-term weight maintenance, he said.

“All calories are not alike,” said Ludwig, director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Children’s Hospital Boston and a professor at Harvard Medical School, in a June 22 telephone interview. “Rather than trying to eliminate fat or carbohydrates choose the middle ground that lets you eat the widest variety of foods as long as the focus remains on the quality of the nutrients.”

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Reply Low-Fat Diet After Weight Loss May Raise Risk Of Gain (Original post)
xchrom Jun 2012 OP
NRaleighLiberal Jun 2012 #1
get the red out Jun 2012 #2
NRaleighLiberal Jun 2012 #3
get the red out Jun 2012 #4
mzmolly Jun 2012 #5
Big Blue Marble Jun 2012 #6

Response to xchrom (Original post)

Wed Jun 27, 2012, 07:24 AM

1. I can agree with the findings from experience first hand -

Joined WW in Jan 2011 - at 258 lbs. followed their plan to the letter, dropped to 210 lbs by mid summer - maintained through end of 2011. In Jan 2012, my wife and I tried the Engine 2 vegan plan through Whole Foods - mostly grains and veggies - dropped to 195 by March. I've kept to mostly veggie with a trace of vegan (I know, not possible - most think it is all or nothing) - but switched to almond/rice/soy milk, very little dairy, hardly any meat - kept a bit of seafood - but fruit and veggies and grains. Added a work out program at a gym - here it is approaching July, still 195 and feeling the best I've ever felt. If I do slip a bit on any given week, the pounds want to come on quite quickly - I also think our bodies, if we have been at a weight for a long time, consider it sort of a set point and try to gain weight back on numbers of calories that are still quite low.

My biggest success habit - since Jan 2011 I keep a daily food diary - at the end of each day, in a Google calendar entry - and roughly use the WW point system to track. I mean everything - it is the honesty that makes it work - so if you gain, there is a clear correlation.

So at 6 feet, 56 years old and 195 lbs - I'd love to get to 185, maybe 190 - but even if I stay where I am the rest of my life I'd be happy - we love the way we eat, I don't really miss anything I used to eat (and really we aren't all that strict - it is about moderation/portion size as well). Those morning and afternoon fruit breaks - bowl of melon, berries, etc - are incredibly satisfying!

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Response to xchrom (Original post)

Wed Jun 27, 2012, 08:57 AM

2. Hungry all the time

Very low fat diets leave me hungry all the time. If I'm hungry all the time I consume large amounts of calories in "low fat" options. Calories in without calories out = weight gain.

Diets in general don't work for maintaining weight for me. I have found balancing my diet and getting exercise work best for me. I dieted so much as a young woman I have stretch marks from the yo-yo effect. I can attest to the starvation - rebound effect, there's evidence on my body.

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Response to get the red out (Reply #2)

Wed Jun 27, 2012, 09:09 AM

3. the other thing we've found - empty, sugary snacks demand you eat more of them.

if we stick to grains, veggies and fruit we end up feeling full. If we eat some cake, a cookie, snacks like chips - you just want to keep eating and eating them. which leads to too many calories of course.

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #3)

Wed Jun 27, 2012, 10:21 AM

4. That's absolutely true!

The meaningless "snacks" make things a lot worse.

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Response to xchrom (Original post)

Wed Jun 27, 2012, 02:06 PM

5. Fascinating

article.

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Response to xchrom (Original post)

Thu Jun 28, 2012, 02:31 PM

6. This has been my experience.

Over two years ago, I lost 60 pounds and have successfully maintained
my new weight with a low glycemic mostly vegetarian diet. Lots of
vegetables and fruits, whole grains, especially Ezekiel Bread are the
staples of my diet with moderate amounts of fats and proteins

On this diet, I have hardly any food cravings and actually am able to eat more
calories than I have in years. I combine this diet with an exercise
regime of high intensity interval training. It is an awesome combo.

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