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Tue Feb 7, 2012, 12:11 PM

Wind Power Market Rose to 41 Gigawatts in 2011, Led by China

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-02-07/wind-power-market-rose-to-41-gigawatts-in-2011-led-by-china.html

The global wind power market rose 6 percent to 41 gigawatts last year, led by China, which captured more than two-fifths of the total, the Global Wind Energy Council said today in a report.

China installed 18 gigawatts of turbines in 2011, followed by the U.S. with 6.8 gigawatts and India’s 3 gigawatts. Germany, the U.K., Canada and Spain followed, according to the Brussels- based industry lobby group.

<more>

“Despite the state of the global economy, wind power continues to be the renewable generation technology of choice,” GWEC Secretary-General Steve Sawyer said in an e-mailed statement. “2011 was a tough year, as will be 2012, but the long-term fundamentals of the industry remain very sound.”

Wind power capacity now totals 238 gigawatts worldwide. The 6.8 gigawatts installed in the U.S. last year could power almost 2 million American homes, and the industry is on its way to providing 20 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030, according to the statement.

<more>

40 replies, 2872 views

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Arrow 40 replies Author Time Post
Reply Wind Power Market Rose to 41 Gigawatts in 2011, Led by China (Original post)
jpak Feb 2012 OP
FBaggins Feb 2012 #1
jpak Feb 2012 #2
FBaggins Feb 2012 #4
jpak Feb 2012 #6
FBaggins Feb 2012 #7
kristopher Feb 2012 #9
FBaggins Feb 2012 #10
jpak Feb 2012 #13
FBaggins Feb 2012 #14
kristopher Feb 2012 #18
FBaggins Feb 2012 #20
kristopher Feb 2012 #23
FBaggins Feb 2012 #24
kristopher Feb 2012 #26
FBaggins Feb 2012 #29
kristopher Feb 2012 #34
FBaggins Feb 2012 #39
jpak Feb 2012 #11
FBaggins Feb 2012 #15
kristopher Feb 2012 #17
FBaggins Feb 2012 #22
kristopher Feb 2012 #8
jpak Feb 2012 #12
FBaggins Feb 2012 #16
kristopher Feb 2012 #19
FBaggins Feb 2012 #21
kristopher Feb 2012 #25
FBaggins Feb 2012 #27
kristopher Feb 2012 #30
FBaggins Feb 2012 #32
kristopher Feb 2012 #35
FBaggins Feb 2012 #37
kristopher Feb 2012 #3
FBaggins Feb 2012 #5
Dead_Parrot Feb 2012 #36
FBaggins Feb 2012 #38
Dead_Parrot Feb 2012 #40
kristopher Feb 2012 #28
FBaggins Feb 2012 #31
kristopher Feb 2012 #33

Response to jpak (Original post)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 12:18 PM

1. How does that 6% compare to the last few years?

When's the last time it was this low?

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 12:28 PM

2. What percent of 200 is 41?

Critical thinking

yup

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Response to jpak (Reply #2)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 01:50 PM

4. Critical thinking? Try reading comprehension.

How does the 6% growth rate compare to prior years' growth rate?

IOW, is the rate of increase accelerating or decelerating... and by how much?

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #4)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:21 PM

6. OK I will do this slowly

If there are now 238 GW of installed wind power capacity.

and we added 41 GW last year to get to 238 GW.

What was the annual growth rate in 2011?

(clue: typos do happen - this is where critical thinking comes in handy)

yup

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Response to jpak (Reply #6)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:26 PM

7. You can go as slow as you like, but until you actually "get it"... you can't answer.

You're still not reading that right. Sorry.

6% is not the rate of increase in total capacity from last year (you would have gotten this had you actually done that division). It's the second derivative. The rate of change in the annual change.

What was that second derivative in 2010? 2009? etc? Is the acceleration in the rate of growth positive or negative... and to what extent?

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #7)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:32 PM

9. Flopping like a fish out of water

Now, about the rate of growth in the nuclear industry last year...

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Response to kristopher (Reply #9)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:34 PM

10. I knew you had trouble with basic physics...

...but we're talking highschool math here.

It isn't a complicated question.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #10)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:57 PM

13. The 6% refers to the contribution of wind to global generating capacity

yup

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Response to jpak (Reply #13)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:19 PM

14. No it doesn't.

Now the reading comprehension weakness is in your ability to understand your own article?

First of all. Global wind production isn't anywhere close to 6% of total generation.

But that doesn't matter. Because they're clearly talking about the growth in the size of the wind power market. That is... the amount of new generating capacity added in 2011 compared to the amount added in 2010. As I said... the second derivative. The amount they sold (in label capacity, not dollars) is 6% higher than it was in the previous year.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #14)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:34 PM

18. Why don't you stop acting out?

Where did jpak write that wind was 6% of total generation? You misread the article and you are intent on trying to cover it up.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #18)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:36 PM

20. Acting out? I'm simply correcting his ongoing misunderstanding.

Where did jpak write that wind was 6% of total generation?

His post title was "The 6% refers to the contribution of wind to global generating capacity" You can twist that if you choose to, but nothing changes that simple fact that this is not what the 6% in the article refers to... as your correction to him makes clear.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #20)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:40 PM

23. You are acting out. Please stop disrupting the discussion.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #23)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:41 PM

24. The discussion ended after reply #1

Everything else has been avoidance on your part and calling you on it on mine.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #24)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:49 PM

26. Avoidance of what?

You clearly construed the 6% as referring to rate of growth in installed capacity.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #26)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:52 PM

29. Excuse me?

You clearly construed the 6% as referring to rate of growth in installed capacity.

Where? I never did anything of the sort. That's how jpak MISconstrued the question... but I clearly asked for the prior year figure that's comparable to the reported 6%.

I have yet to get one.

On edit - How you can read "6% is not the rate of increase in total capacity from last year" and get "clearly construed the 6% as referring to rate of growth in installed capacity" is hilarious.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #29)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 05:00 PM

34. No. I don't think your behavior is able to be excused.

FBaggins
1. How does that 6% compare to the last few years?

When's the last time it was this low?

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Response to kristopher (Reply #34)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 05:09 PM

39. The answer is in #38

Let me know if you need help with the math.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #7)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:53 PM

11. It grew at 21% per year in 2011

There are now 238 GW of installed wind capacity - after 41 GW was added in 2011.

238-41 = 197 GW that is the installed capacity at the end of 2010.

(41/197) * 100 = 21%

duh

yup

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Response to jpak (Reply #11)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:21 PM

15. Still not getting that highschool math thingy, eh?

What you just provided is the first derivative. The 6% figure is the second derivative.

"Duh" indeed.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #7)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:30 PM

17. FBaggins 1. How does that 6% compare to the last few years?

FBaggins
1. How does that 6% compare to the last few years?
When's the last time it was this low?



You've become a self perpetuating joke, Baggins

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Response to kristopher (Reply #17)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:38 PM

22. The "joke" is that you keep dodging the question.

If you simply answered it there wouldn't be anything to "perpetuate".

But you embarass yourself with this continual spamming of the thread while ignoring the question.

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Response to jpak (Reply #6)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:30 PM

8. Maybe this will help

Led By China, Global Wind Energy Installations Top 41 GW In 2011
by NAW Staff on Tuesday 07 February 2012


The global wind industry installed over 41 GW of wind energy in 2011, bringing the total global installed capacity to more than 238 GW at the end of last year, the Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) announced in its latest report. This represents an increase of 21%, with growth in the size of the annual global market of just over 6%.

About 75 countries worldwide now have commercial wind power installations, and 22 of them have already passed the 1 GW mark.

Despite having faced a challenging year, China has consolidated its position as the global market leader, installing 18 GW in 2011 for a cumulative capacity of more than 62 GW. India was also a leader, installing over 3 GW of wind power in 2011 to push the nation’s total capacity to just over 16 GW - a number that is likely to go up to 5 GW per year by 2015, according to D.V. Giri, chairman of the Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association...

http://nawindpower.com/e107_plugins/content/content.php?content.9353


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Response to kristopher (Reply #8)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 02:55 PM

12. It still won't convince him

nope

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Response to jpak (Reply #12)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:24 PM

16. It "convinces" me that you still don't get it.

The relevant quote from what Kris is showing you is "growth in the size of the annual global market of just over 6%."

I'm asking you for the comparable figure for the last three years. Is 6% a good number or a bad number?

If you can provide a resource for global wind capacity over the last decade or so, I'll be happy to do the math for you.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #16)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:35 PM

19. Please stop acting like a troll.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #19)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:37 PM

21. You wouldn't know a troll if you saw one in the mirror.

And this thread proves it.

Once again... it was a VERY simple question and you guys are dancing around the subject. At first I thought it was that you knew the answer and didn't like what it says... but know it looks more like the problem is ignorance of simple mathematics.

Why you keep whining about it is beyond me.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #21)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:46 PM

25. You obviously stepped in it in post 1.

You are now trying to cover that mistake by a strategy of disruption.

Please stop.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #25)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:50 PM

27. Can you back that up?

Where in the thread is there an aswer to the simple question asked?

See your post #8. The 6% is the "growth in the size of the annual global market" - That is... the amount of new wind added during the year compared to the amount added the prior year.

What's the comparable figure for 2010, 2009, etc?

The disruption is all yours. It's a VERY simple question. Tell me the total capacity by year for the last decade and I'll tell you the answer.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #30)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:55 PM

32. A simple "no" would have sufficed.

The question is clear and simple. Your inability to answer it indicts your basic math skills.

Your continual spamming of the thread indicts your credibility and maturity.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #32)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 05:01 PM

35. ...

FBaggins
1. How does that 6% compare to the last few years?

When's the last time it was this low?


That is what you wrote and it is obvious you were referring to the rate of growth in installed capacity. You screwed the pooch, just admit it and move on.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #35)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 05:03 PM

37. I'm looking for the answer... not a repeat of the question.

So what is it?

If you can't do the math... I'm happy to help.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 01:28 PM

3. How many industries grew in 2011?

Using the economic crisis as an excuse Conservatives around the world have been attacking the transition to renewables, yet even so wind and solar grew. How did it turn out for nuclear?

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Response to kristopher (Reply #3)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 01:52 PM

5. Did the economic crisis start in 2011?

I must have missed that. I could have sworn it was earlier.

I take it your attempt to dodge the question is because you know the answer and don't like it.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #1)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 05:01 PM

36. Raw figures:

"In the year 2010, the wind capacity reached worldwide 196 630 Megawatt, after 159 050 MW in 2009, 120 903 MW in 2008, and 93 930 MW in 2007."

http://www.wwindea.org/home/images/stories/pdfs/worldwindenergyreport2010_s.pdf

I'll leave you to count the beads.

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Response to Dead_Parrot (Reply #36)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 05:08 PM

38. So the comparable figure for 2009 is 41% and for 2010 is -1.5%. Thanks.

So not too bad all things considered.

I wonder what their projection is for 2012.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #38)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 05:16 PM

40. Probably 200% ;)

My money's on around 20%, FWIW.

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Response to jpak (Original post)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:51 PM

28. 41 GW of wind = actual output of approx 17 nuclear reactors.

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Response to kristopher (Reply #28)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:54 PM

31. Inconsistently... and for a much shorter period of time... but so what?

At what price? And with how much generation 2-3 decades later?

Is there a dollar figure for the size of the wind market in 2011?

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Response to kristopher (Reply #28)

Tue Feb 7, 2012, 04:57 PM

33. That is 17 nuclear plants worth of generation built in 1 year.

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