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Tue May 28, 2013, 09:10 AM

Livermore scientists develop CO2 sequestration technique that produces 'supergreen' hydrogen fuel, …

(Please note, Press Release from US National Laboratory — Copyright concerns are nil.)

http://www.llnl.gov/news/newsreleases/2013/May/NR-13-05-07.html
For immediate release: 05/27/2013 | NR-13-05-07

Livermore scientists develop CO2 sequestration technique that produces 'supergreen' hydrogen fuel, offsets ocean acidification

Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov

LIVERMORE, Calif. -- Lawrence Livermore scientists have discovered and demonstrated a new technique to remove and store atmospheric carbon dioxide while generating carbon-negative hydrogen and producing alkalinity, which can be used to offset ocean acidification.

The team demonstrated, at a laboratory scale, a system that uses the acidity normally produced in saline water electrolysis to accelerate silicate mineral dissolution while producing hydrogen fuel and other gases. The resulting electrolyte solution was shown to be significantly elevated in hydroxide concentration that in turn proved strongly absorptive and retentive of atmospheric CO2.

Further, the researchers suggest that the carbonate and bicarbonate produced in the process could be used to mitigate ongoing ocean acidification, similar to how an Alka Seltzer neutralizes excess acid in the stomach.

"We not only found a way to remove and store carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing valuable H2, we also suggest that we can help save marine ecosystems with this new technique," said Greg Rau, an LLNL visiting scientist, senior scientist at UC Santa Cruz and lead author of a paper appearing this week (May 27) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

When carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere, a significant fraction is passively taken up by the ocean forming carbonic acid that makes the ocean more acidic. This acidification has been shown to be harmful to many species of marine life, especially corals and shellfish. By the middle of this century, the globe will likely warm by at least 2 degrees Celsius and the oceans will experience a more than 60 percent increase in acidity relative to pre-industrial levels. The alkaline solution generated by the new process could be added to the ocean to help neutralize this acid and help offset its effects on marine biota. However, further research is needed, the authors said.

"When powered by renewable electricity and consuming globally abundant minerals and saline solutions, such systems at scale might provide a relatively efficient, high-capacity means to consume and store excess atmospheric CO2 as environmentally beneficial seawater bicarbonate or carbonate," Rau said. "But the process also would produce a carbon-negative 'super green' fuel or chemical feedstock in the form of hydrogen."

Most previously described chemical methods of atmospheric carbon dioxide capture and storage are costly, using thermal/mechanical procedures to concentrate molecular CO2 from the air while recycling reagents, a process that is cumbersome, inefficient and expensive.

"Our process avoids most of these issues by not requiring CO2 to be concentrated from air and stored in a molecular form, pointing the way to more cost-effective, environmentally beneficial, and safer air CO2 management with added benefits of renewable hydrogen fuel production and ocean alkalinity addition," Rau said.

The team concluded that further research is needed to determine optimum designs and operating procedures, cost-effectiveness, and the net environmental impact/benefit of electrochemically mediated air CO2 capture and H2 production using base minerals.

Other Livermore researchers include Susan Carroll, William Bourcier, Michael Singleton, Megan Smith and Roger Aines.

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Reply Livermore scientists develop CO2 sequestration technique that produces 'supergreen' hydrogen fuel, … (Original post)
OKIsItJustMe May 2013 OP
Botany May 2013 #1
OKIsItJustMe May 2013 #2
BlueToTheBone May 2013 #3
Socialistlemur May 2013 #4
wtmusic May 2013 #5
OKIsItJustMe May 2013 #7
wtmusic May 2013 #8
OKIsItJustMe May 2013 #9
wtmusic May 2013 #10
OKIsItJustMe May 2013 #11
wtmusic May 2013 #12
OKIsItJustMe May 2013 #13
OKIsItJustMe May 2013 #6

Response to OKIsItJustMe (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2013, 09:22 AM

1. Thanx for posting!

I hope these concepts work outside of the lab. Very interesting.

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Response to Botany (Reply #1)

Tue May 28, 2013, 09:24 AM

2. You’re welcome!

Clearly, we’ve got to do something

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Response to OKIsItJustMe (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2013, 10:45 AM

3. Go Livermore! This is wonderful news.

Now if only.

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Response to OKIsItJustMe (Original post)

Wed May 29, 2013, 06:12 AM

4. Note the catch: it consumes electricity

This is one more example of worthless research being touted with a publication which gives very little detail. But I did notice the process consumes electricity like crazy. This means there has to be a huge power plant backing it up.

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Response to Socialistlemur (Reply #4)

Wed May 29, 2013, 11:21 AM

5. Here's the catch: "When powered by renewable electricity..."

This kind of research is powered by renewable federal grants, which are much more reliable.

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Response to wtmusic (Reply #5)

Wed May 29, 2013, 11:46 AM

7. Oh, good grief!

http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-announces-new-funding-opportunity-innovative-small-modular-reactors
Energy Department Announces New Funding Opportunity for Innovative Small Modular Reactors

March 11, 2013 - 2:45pm

WASHINGTON – As part of the Obama Administration’s all-of-the-above energy strategy to speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy, the Energy Department today issued a new funding opportunity announcement to help U.S. industry design and certify innovative small modular nuclear reactors (SMRs). Building off the cost-share agreement announced in November 2012, this follow-on solicitation is open to other companies and manufacturers and is focused on furthering small modular reactor efficiency, operations and design.

“As President Obama said in the State of the Union, the Administration is committed to speeding the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. Innovative energy technologies, including small modular reactors, will help provide low-carbon energy to American homes and businesses, while giving our nation a key competitive edge in the global clean energy race,” said Energy Secretary Steven Chu. “The funding opportunity announced today is focused on bringing innovative small modular reactors to market, creating new jobs and businesses in the United States.”

The Energy Department will solicit proposals for cost-shared small modular reactor projects that have the potential to be licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and achieve commercial operation around 2025, while offering innovative and effective solutions for enhanced safety, operations and performance. Selected projects will span a five-year period with at least 50 percent provided by private industry. Subject to congressional appropriations, federal funding for this solicitation and the project announced last year will be derived from the total $452 million identified for the Department’s Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support program.

Small modular reactors – which are approximately one-third the size of current nuclear power plants – have compact, scalable designs that are expected to offer a host of safety, construction and economic benefits. The Energy Department is seeking 300 megawatts or smaller reactor designs that can be made in factories and transported to sites where they would be ready to “plug and play” upon arrival. The smaller size reduces both capital costs and construction times and also makes these reactors ideal for small electric grids and for locations that cannot support large reactors.

Today’s funding opportunity announcement follows the Energy Department’s cost-share agreement announced last year to accelerate commercialization of a small modular reactor design that targets a 2022 deployment date. Under that agreement, the Department will share costs on the design, certification and licensing of the B&W mPower small modular reactor design, with B&W providing at least 50 percent of the total cost. The Tennessee Valley Authority plans to deploy two 180 megawatt small modular reactor units for commercial operation in Roane County, Tennessee, by 2021, with as many as six mPower units at that site.

Find more information on the funding opportunity announced today at Grants.gov.


All aboard the gravy train!

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Response to OKIsItJustMe (Reply #7)

Wed May 29, 2013, 11:51 AM

8. Renewables power small modular reactors too?

Thanks for the heads up!

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Response to wtmusic (Reply #8)

Wed May 29, 2013, 11:53 AM

9. No, small reactors are powered by “federal grants”

I suppose I was far to subtle.

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Response to OKIsItJustMe (Reply #9)

Wed May 29, 2013, 11:55 AM

10. Nah, here's subtle...

Small modular reactors actually show some hope of paying off.

Take your time.

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Response to wtmusic (Reply #10)

Wed May 29, 2013, 12:00 PM

11. Renewable power pays off all the time

You just hate to admit it.

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Response to OKIsItJustMe (Reply #11)

Wed May 29, 2013, 12:07 PM

12. Renewable power is extremely valuable to fossil fuel companies as a diversion

from anything that will significantly detract from their core income stream - a big payoff, indeed.

Can we agree on that?

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Response to wtmusic (Reply #12)

Wed May 29, 2013, 12:32 PM

13. No, I don’t agree

“Fossil fuel companies” are primarily “companies.” They tend to do whatever will make them the most money for the least amount of effort. To date, fossil fuels give big payoffs for relatively little investment.

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Response to Socialistlemur (Reply #4)

Wed May 29, 2013, 11:41 AM

6. You didn’t catch anything, not even the whole point.



Most previously described chemical methods of atmospheric carbon dioxide capture and storage are costly, using thermal/mechanical procedures to concentrate molecular CO2 from the air while recycling reagents, a process that is cumbersome, inefficient and expensive.

"Our process avoids most of these issues by not requiring CO2 to be concentrated from air and stored in a molecular form, pointing the way to more cost-effective, environmentally beneficial, and safer air CO2 management with added benefits of renewable hydrogen fuel production and ocean alkalinity addition," Rau said.

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