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Thu Dec 13, 2012, 07:46 PM

Michigan bill a step toward allowing wolf hunts

Source: Associated Press

Michigan bill a step toward allowing wolf hunts

By JOHN FLESHER, AP Environmental Writer
Updated 7:09 pm, Thursday, December 13, 2012

LANSING, Mich. (AP) Michigan moved to the brink of establishing hunting seasons for the gray wolf Thursday, as the state Legislature prepared to enact a bill designating the once-imperiled species a game animal.

Four decades after the federal government outlawed killing wolves to prevent them from going extinct in the lower 48 states, the resilient predators have bounced back in the Upper Great Lakes and Northern Rockies. Their combined population exceeded 4,000 when dropped from the endangered species list in January.

Since then, hunting has begun in five states Minnesota, Wisconsin, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming and officials say more than 640 wolves have been trapped or shot. Environmentalists are fighting in court to restore federal protections in Wyoming, and the Humane Society of the United States has served notice of intent to do likewise in the Great Lakes region.

-snip-

The state House approved the measure Wednesday and returned it to the Senate, which had passed it earlier, for consideration of a technical amendment that awaited approval Thursday. Gov. Rick Snyder is expected to sign the bill, which is supported by the Department of Natural Resources.

-snip-

Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/news/science/article/Michigan-bill-a-step-toward-allowing-wolf-hunts-4115092.php

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Reply Michigan bill a step toward allowing wolf hunts (Original post)
Eugene Dec 2012 OP
upaloopa Dec 2012 #1
Eleanors38 Dec 2012 #3
Eleanors38 Dec 2012 #2
ProgressiveProfessor Dec 2012 #4
Eleanors38 Dec 2012 #5

Response to Eugene (Original post)

Thu Dec 13, 2012, 07:53 PM

1. So what do you do when you kill a wolf?

You don't eat it. You can't make a coat unless you kill more than one?
Do you kill wolves because you can?
I know wolves kill livestock but the wolves were there first and are only acting like wolves. I think money plays a part. You can't sell a dead cow and maybe there will be a bounty on wolves again

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Response to upaloopa (Reply #1)

Thu Dec 13, 2012, 08:22 PM

3. Don't think there will be bounties, but the license fees are steep, esp. ...

out of state. I have no idea what people do with wolf remains, though regulated hunting does not uniformly impose a requirement to eat what you kill. Exceptions usually fall under the heading of "varmints." Personally, I follow this principal, but much hunting/culling is done with an aim to prevent habitat degradation, esp. by feral hogs. The argument has been applied to wolves, mainly because of threats to other species (elk, mule deer, etc.), and livestock deprivation. Where deer are thinned out by government employees in Texas, provision is made for the slaughter of the animals, and stocking food banks. If wolves are like deer, more than one hide/coat is necessary. Perhaps some kind of arrangement can be made to consolidate the hides in suitable numbers for a tannery to take the order (with deer it is usually 5).

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Response to Eugene (Original post)

Thu Dec 13, 2012, 08:14 PM

2. I have some questions about hunts and killings in the Western states...

There were at least 2 threads opened about the killing of a favored collared she-wolf. The threads were filled with such animosity and outright hatred, I figured there would be little point in investigating further in those threads. I have some questions you might be able to answer:

(1) Was the killing of the collared wolf legal?
(2) Was the killing part of a regulated hunt, or was it due to deprivation of live stock?
(3) If, as was proposed, a buffer is set up outside of Yellowstone, would this be federal overreach into state powers?
(4) What are the allowable kills in order to maintain a "balance" between other species in wolf re-introduction areas?
(5) Are regulated hunts necessary to prevent a rapid spread of wolves, causing imbalances?

Thanks.

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Response to Eleanors38 (Reply #2)

Thu Dec 13, 2012, 08:58 PM

4. Answers

1) Yes
2) The hunters were properly licensed to take wolves
3) Probably but it will not be the first time that has happened
4) Varies by state
5) Depends on whom you speak with.

I have not hunted in forever. If I did I would not take an animal that was obviously part of a study.

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Response to ProgressiveProfessor (Reply #4)

Fri Dec 14, 2012, 10:43 AM

5. I agree with you on the taking of "study" animals.

Wish there was a better way to mark those wolves; miniaturization has its downside. Maybe the animals will have to be spray-painted. How a wolf hunts under those conditions, I don't know.

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