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Sat May 26, 2012, 09:29 AM

Stunning photos drive home the destructiveness of tar sands




Dial-up warning: many large photos.

http://www.businessinsider.com/canadian-oil-sands-flyover-2012-5?op=1

20 replies, 2730 views

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Arrow 20 replies Author Time Post
Reply Stunning photos drive home the destructiveness of tar sands (Original post)
Submariner May 2012 OP
NYC_SKP May 2012 #1
GCP May 2012 #2
FogerRox May 2012 #14
asjr May 2012 #3
Surya Gayatri May 2012 #4
tabatha May 2012 #5
dkf May 2012 #6
arikara May 2012 #18
BlueToTheBone May 2012 #20
dickthegrouch May 2012 #7
otohara May 2012 #8
Meiko May 2012 #9
tabatha May 2012 #12
Meiko May 2012 #15
FogerRox May 2012 #13
Meiko May 2012 #16
FogerRox May 2012 #17
arikara May 2012 #19
FogerRox May 2012 #10
arcane1 May 2012 #11

Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 09:37 AM

1. Take nothing but pictures, Leave nothing but footprints...

...kill nothing but time.

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 09:52 AM

2. Ugly

You can see these huge pits from 35,000 ft when flying cross-country. They're raping the earth in the name of fossil fuel.

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Response to GCP (Reply #2)

Sat May 26, 2012, 04:55 PM

14. Visible from Orbit......... Visible on Google EArth too.

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 10:21 AM

3. The Greed Basin.

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 10:27 AM

4. Amazing! Almost as informative as an on-site guided tour.

The super-heated steam drilling process certainly looks cleaner and less destructive than the open-pit mines. But, what's happening underground?

Thanks for posting this, Sub!

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 11:00 AM

5. This needs to go viral.

How disgusting. How heartbreaking.

Ruining the planet so that we can drive around with gas and ruin the planet more.

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 11:46 AM

6. Maybe that is the trade off for 240,000 jobs and affordable oil.

 

Canada is in a lot better shape financially because they are doing this sort of thing. If we greatly dislike it we need to boost oil prices significantly higher to discourage use and encourage a transition to renewables.

It's all about choices.

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Response to dkf (Reply #6)

Sun May 27, 2012, 12:49 AM

18. Yet if the oil prices weren't so high

it wouldn't be worth their while to destroy so much of Alberta to extract it. Its a catch 22.

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Response to dkf (Reply #6)

Sun May 27, 2012, 08:56 AM

20. When the only thing left is money

what will we eat? How will we live?

I agree that we need to discourage and boost, but I think human nature would move more easily if we boosted first and then raised. Alternatives that are possible is the only way it can happen. Without war, we could subsidize the remediation of the planet.

But of course, first, we must deal with the greedy and that is the real question. How?

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 12:51 PM

7. And you know those trucks are the size of small houses /nt

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 01:31 PM

8. So Much Destruction

for one barrel of oil.

Thanks for posting.

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 02:15 PM

9. I thought it was interesting

 

to note that the oil companies must return the land to it's original condition. At least they don't just leave a big open pit like so many mining operations do.

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Response to Meiko (Reply #9)

Sat May 26, 2012, 04:42 PM

12. There is no way at all, ever, that the land can be returned to its original condition.

The soil is disturbed and will take a very long time to recover if at all.

In the meantime all of the invasive plants that proliferate in disturbed areas will take over - probably permanently.

99% of California grasslands are non-native, and they will never return to what they were - and this invasion occurred in areas that were not disturbed at all.

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Response to tabatha (Reply #12)

Sat May 26, 2012, 07:20 PM

15. Poor choice of

 

words on my part. The hole will be filled in, how's that? At least they are forced to cover it up unlike what used to be. I have to agree it would be nice if they could plant something for ground cover, even a tree or two would be nice.

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Response to Meiko (Reply #9)

Sat May 26, 2012, 04:43 PM

13. SLightly inaccurate

All they have to do is establish grasses and such, but once the Muskeg is torn up, it'll take 1000 years to re establish the Muskeg- peat bogs.

So they'll fill in the holes, and drag some soil over the top and plant grasses and such.

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Response to FogerRox (Reply #13)

Sat May 26, 2012, 07:22 PM

16. You are correct

 

It will never be original condition. I don't think you can even regenerate muskeg, that stuff is an eco system onto itself.

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Response to Meiko (Reply #16)

Sat May 26, 2012, 07:47 PM

17. Yup- IT would take 100's if not a 1000 years for Muskeg to develop

In a best case scenario..... sigh

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Response to Meiko (Reply #9)

Sun May 27, 2012, 02:06 AM

19. They can't and won't.

This land was muskeg, which is basically the kidneys of the Earth. What they do is cover it up a bit and plant some easy to grow grasses and trees that never grew there before, a few deer and rabbits might eventually move in but it is in no way what it used to be. There is no way with that destruction that they can put it back and the Harper government could care less as long as the Chinese gets their oil.

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 04:40 PM

10. Destroying the Muskeg, the Canadian peat bogs

Yes, they're supposed to replant the areas, with grass and bushes, it will take 1000 yrs to regenerate the Muskeg if at all.

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Response to Submariner (Original post)

Sat May 26, 2012, 04:41 PM

11. It's like scraping out the residue from a crack pipe, for just one more hit

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