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Thu Dec 6, 2012, 01:04 PM

The New Rise of Segregated Schools


After half a century, America's efforts to end segregation seem to be winding down. In the years after Brown v. Board of Education, 755 school districts were under desegregation orders. A new Stanford study reports that as of 2009, that number had dropped to as few as 268.

The study is the first to take a comprehensive look at whether court-ordered busing successfully ended the legacy of Jim Crow in public education, and it suggests a mission that is far from accomplished. On average, those districts that stopped forcing schools to mix students by race have seen a gradual but steady--and significant--return of racial isolation, especially at the elementary level.

It's unclear what effect school "re-segregation" will have on minority achievement, though a large body of research suggests it certainly won't help efforts to improve test scores, graduation rates, and college entry levels for blacks and Hispanics, a growing share of the American population. But the retreat from desegregation also suggests the policy had significant flaws, problems current education reformers should pay attention to.

The hope behind desegregation was that it would bring together white and black children to learn with, and from, each other, and end the disparities that blacks suffered under legal segregation like hand-me-down textbooks, decrepit buildings, lower-paid teachers, and, of course, lagging achievement. In the three decades following Brown v. Board of Education, courts ordered districts to create elaborate student assignment plans (often dependent on forced busing) to mix black, Hispanic, and white students together in the same schools. Most school boards complied reluctantly, and parents in places like Boston reacted violently.

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http://www.theatlanticcities.com/politics/2012/12/new-rise-segregated-schools/4084/#

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Reply The New Rise of Segregated Schools (Original post)
n2doc Dec 2012 OP
1StrongBlackMan Dec 2012 #1
sulphurdunn Dec 2012 #5
1StrongBlackMan Dec 2012 #6
sulphurdunn Dec 2012 #8
LWolf Dec 2012 #9
ROBROX Dec 2012 #2
Starry Messenger Dec 2012 #3
Igel Dec 2012 #4
1StrongBlackMan Dec 2012 #7

Response to n2doc (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 01:24 PM

1. My own, and decidedly biased, position on the goals of desegregation ...

are twofold (from a Black perspective):

Goal #1: To equalize educational resources and the environment in which the education was delivered.

The thought at the time, I believe, was if white kids went to the same school as Black kids, those white parents would fight to make sure their resources and environment were not diminished ... surly, they would not hurt their own, right?

Nope, enter white-flight to parochial and private (now, charter) schools.

Goal #2:

Allow white kids to interact and, thereby, learn that there are far more commonalities among white and Black, than differences.

But, IMHO, this is/was a lesson that Black (and Hispanic) kids did not need to learn because our survival has always been based in our knowledge of, and ability to navigate among, white folks; but white survival has never been based on knowing anything about Black folks.

I, personally, have no problem with all-Black schools (or even all-white schools), so long as there is a mechanism to ensure that the resources and environment are equal.

I know ... I know ... Brown struck down "separate but equal", but there was never a time when it was anything but separate and unequal.

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Response to 1StrongBlackMan (Reply #1)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 05:45 PM

5. You might have a point.

In my experience a sprinkling of white kids in all black school are treated much worse than the same sprinkling of black kids are treated in an white school and many of those white kids learn to bitterly hate blacks for it. Is that what you meant by separate and unequal?

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Response to sulphurdunn (Reply #5)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 06:06 PM

6. No ...

Not at all. And I suspect you know that.

Btw, that has not been my experience at all. I have attended schools with a sprinkling of white kids (and the rest Black/Hispanic) and for the most part the white kids were not treated badly. I'm not saying their were no racial name calling - generally, as a non-racial incident escalated; but I cannot recall an incident where a white kid was targetted because of their being white, rather the problems came from their being jerks and/or perceived as being weak, in which case they would be targetted regardless of their race.

I also have been the only Black kid in a school, when my race was an issue (with some) everyday.

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Response to 1StrongBlackMan (Reply #6)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 06:41 PM

8. If you were

a white kid in minority majority school your race would be an issue with many everyday. But you are correct, I did not suspect that you really support racial segregation. I honestly believe that we have reached the stage where nothing short of racial integration in public education on a massive scale will save this republic from plutocratic despotism. The corporatists know this too, and that is exactly why their media and political machine has been pushing education reform or more accurately resegregation since passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and especially the Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education decision of 1971. If we aim to make it we should strive for a future where most of us are grey or the color of caramel or oatmeal, have kinky copper hair, a variety of odd noses and slanted amber eyes.

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Response to 1StrongBlackMan (Reply #1)

Sat Dec 8, 2012, 12:07 PM

9. While I think you've made some good points,

I want de-segregated schools. From a white perspective, I want our children growing up with the rest of the world. I want to tear down walls and ivory towers.

The best way for that to happen, imo, is to create a more equal playing field; ALL public schools with resources and environment equally rich and positive, and ALL neighborhoods safe communities. I think our kids deserve that.

It's more than schools; it's also economic opportunity, and a culture that values all members enough to provide abundant safety nets.

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Response to n2doc (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 02:49 PM

2. THEIR WILL AWAYS BE A BIAS

 

I remember going to an all white high school in California. We were only 15 miles from Oakland, CA which had many all black schools. The education was definitely biased because the teachers at each school may have had different attitudes or goals concerning teaching their students. We did have a few minorities that were treated as equals or better. I also developed a very liberal and equal thought practice. I know money spent to educate will always be a big factor or how much funds will be utilized to teach students. I am glad my parents moved to the community were I received a great education. I don't think there are to many people then or now who could ensure their children will be provided an education which will ensure they can have a better life.

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Response to n2doc (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 04:31 PM

3. Funding schools the way we do, from local taxes, also brings a lot of inequities.

I believe in desegregation, but why were there "bad schools" in the first place? It isn't just schools that are segregated, but entire communities. All schools should be top of the line, with robust funding per pupil.

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Response to n2doc (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 07:02 PM

4. There's a ring of districts around Houston thathave a lot of self-segregation.

The districts are mixed. But most schools tend to be mostly white or mostly non-white.

In a district, school base funding's fairly equal between schools at a given level.

Achievement gap remains nearly the same.

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Response to n2doc (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 06:17 PM

7. A little known fact about the Brown v Board litigation ...

was that Marshall was not at all opposed to all Black or all white schools. He nargued that so long as school assignments were neighborhood based, in a time of segregated neighborhoods, there would never be equality in resources or environment.

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