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Mon Nov 5, 2012, 11:03 AM

How Do You Raise a Prodigy?

Drew Petersen didn’t speak until he was 3½, but his mother, Sue, never believed he was slow. When he was 18 months old, in 1994, she was reading to him and skipped a word, whereupon Drew reached over and pointed to the missing word on the page. Drew didn’t produce much sound at that stage, but he already cared about it deeply. “Church bells would elicit a big response,” Sue told me. “Birdsong would stop him in his tracks.”

Sue, who learned piano as a child, taught Drew the basics on an old upright, and he became fascinated by sheet music. “He needed to decode it,” Sue said. “So I had to recall what little I remembered, which was the treble clef.” As Drew told me, “It was like learning 13 letters of the alphabet and then trying to read books.” He figured out the bass clef on his own, and when he began formal lessons at 5, his teacher said he could skip the first six months’ worth of material. Within the year, Drew was performing Beethoven sonatas at the recital hall at Carnegie Hall. “I thought it was delightful,” Sue said, “but I also thought we shouldn’t take it too seriously. He was just a little boy.”

On his way to kindergarten one day, Drew asked his mother, “Can I just stay home so I can learn something?” Sue was at a loss. “He was reading textbooks this big, and they’re in class holding up a blowup M,” she said. Drew, who is now 18, said: “At first, it felt lonely. Then you accept that, yes, you’re different from everyone else, but people will be your friends anyway.” Drew’s parents moved him to a private school. They bought him a new piano, because he announced at 7 that their upright lacked dynamic contrast. “It cost more money than we’d ever paid for anything except a down payment on a house,” Sue said. When Drew was 14, he discovered a home-school program created by Harvard; when I met him two years ago, he was 16, studying at the Manhattan School of Music and halfway to a Harvard bachelor’s degree.

Prodigies are able to function at an advanced adult level in some domain before age 12. “Prodigy” derives from the Latin “prodigium,” a monster that violates the natural order. These children have differences so evident as to resemble a birth defect, and it was in that context that I came to investigate them. Having spent 10 years researching a book about children whose experiences differ radically from those of their parents and the world around them, I found that stigmatized differences — having Down syndrome, autism or deafness; being a dwarf or being transgender — are often clouds with silver linings. Families grappling with these apparent problems may find profound meaning, even beauty, in them. Prodigiousness, conversely, looks from a distance like silver, but it comes with banks of clouds; genius can be as bewildering and hazardous as a disability. Despite the past century’s breakthroughs in psychology and neuroscience, prodigiousness and genius are as little understood as autism. “Genius is an abnormality, and can signal other abnormalities,” says Veda Kaplinsky of Juilliard, perhaps the world’s pre-eminent teacher of young pianists. “Many gifted kids have A.D.D. or O.C.D. or Asperger’s. When the parents are confronted with two sides of a kid, they’re so quick to acknowledge the positive, the talented, the exceptional; they are often in denial over everything else.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/magazine/how-do-you-raise-a-prodigy.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=edit_th_20121104

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Reply How Do You Raise a Prodigy? (Original post)
groovedaddy Nov 2012 OP
kerouac2 Nov 2012 #1
Speck Tater Nov 2012 #3
BlueToTheBone Nov 2012 #4
Speck Tater Nov 2012 #5
Speck Tater Nov 2012 #2
HiPointDem Nov 2012 #6
Speck Tater Nov 2012 #7

Response to groovedaddy (Original post)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 11:08 AM

1. A: You raise a prodigy using your knees, not your back.


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Response to kerouac2 (Reply #1)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 11:27 AM

3. Huh? You knee them in the groin? Or what?

 

That doesn't make any sense.

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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #3)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 11:45 AM

4. This is a safe lifting technique

that saves you from hurting yourself...you know, how do you RAISE a prodigy...lol?

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Response to BlueToTheBone (Reply #4)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 11:48 AM

5. Ah. I get it. An obscure pun on "raise". That makes sense. nt

 

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Response to groovedaddy (Original post)

Mon Nov 5, 2012, 11:26 AM

2. More importantly, why would you want to?

 

Prodigies tend to be miserable as adults. Children should be allowed to have a real childhood.

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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #2)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 01:18 AM

6. +1. one thing i've noticed about parents, they all think their kids are exceptionally smart. all

 

my relatives, all my friends, at some point during their children's/grandchildren's/neices & nephews' childhoods have said to me: "Little X is soooo smart!" Like their kid is a shining star in a sea of mediocrity.

Another thing i've noticed -- when they have their own kids they become less interested in other people's.

All kids are smart, sharp, cute, curious, interested in the world -- is my opinion. Until we ruin them. By doing things like trying to create freaking 'prodigies'.

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Response to HiPointDem (Reply #6)

Tue Nov 6, 2012, 01:26 AM

7. Lake Wobegon...

 

..."where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average."

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