HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Economy & Education » Education (Group) » Parsing the Black-White S...
Introducing Discussionist: A new forum by the creators of DU

Thu Mar 22, 2012, 11:09 PM

Parsing the Black-White School Suspension Gap

The U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights recently released data on suspension rates in the U.S. After surveying 72,000 schools that served roughly 85% of the nation’s students they found that black children represent 35% of all suspensions and 39% of all expulsions, though they comprise only 18% of the student population.

Many are calling this proof that the education system discriminates against children of color (Latino suspension and expulsion rates were also high). Considering how much prejudice and discrimination occur in our society at large, it would be surprising if some of it didn’t trickle down to our schools, as well. One would expect some outright racism to be at play, as well as some less overt racial profiling. Indeed, there are studies indicating that black students are disciplined more severely than white students for similar or lesser infractions.

Yet the problem is more complex and pervasive than simple racism or prejudice by some teachers. For example, if suspension and expulsion rates were broken down by socioeconomic status, one would likely find much higher rates of suspensions, expulsions and other disciplinary actions against lower income children than affluent children. Since higher percentages of black and Latino children are poor, it might be that poverty plays a role in discipline, too, possibly even the primary role.

The Wealth-Behavior Connection
Schools are essentially middle class institutions, run by people who either have middle class backgrounds or who have learned to thrive in a middle class environment through their educational and professional experiences. The expectations, norms and mores of the classroom are consequently the product of middle class culture. Students who come from affluent backgrounds, therefore, generally have these expectations, norms and mores internalized and are more likely to behave in the way expected by their teachers, while working class and poor children sometimes have to learn a disciplinary system and expectations that are substantially different from what they are used to.

Children who grow up in a more authoritarian disciplinary culture, for example, might respond more positively to the demand that they “clean up now!” than to the request, “Would you please clean up?” or the announcement that “it is clean up time.” These last two statements, like “Would you mind closing the door?” are actually middle class commands disguised as friendly requests. Someone who is not used to this roundabout way of speaking might believe they actually have a choice. Noncompliance would therefore not only be reasonable, but within the range of acceptable behaviors. Yet a teacher might see this as defiance or disrespect, leading to disciplinary action against the child.

There are also school policies that disproportionately target youth of color without any racist intent. Sagging pants, for example, is a typical dress code violation, yet it is more common among lower income youth of color than among middle class white boys. The question is, are black boys busted for this while white girls with exposed midriffs and white boys with inappropriate t-shirts are allowed to walk?

It is not just that lower income children have different cultural backgrounds than their teachers. They are also more likely to be behind their affluent peers in academic skills, which makes it harder for them to do the classwork and increases the likelihood of off-task or disruptive behavior. Imagine having to sit still for 30-45 minutes with a book or lecture you cannot comprehend.

While the CRDC data indicates that black children are more likely to be labeled as special needs, it is not clear that this is due to the racism of schools and teachers. It might be due to their socioeconomic status. Poverty increases the chances of that a child will have a learning disability. Poor children, for example, are more likely to suffer low birth weights and malnutrition, which can lead to disabilities. Iron-deficiency anemia, which impairs cognitive ability, is twice as common among poor children. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 10% of poor students have dangerous levels of lead in their blood, which can lead to decreased intelligence. Smoking, which is also significantly higher among poor and working class people, can lead to premature births and low birth weights, which both contribute to poor long-term health, cognitive impairment and learning disabilities.

Schools and teachers should obviously look at their policies and how they are enforced to reduce any institutionalized, deliberate or unintended racist inequities. They also need to do a better job of understanding the cultural backgrounds of their students so that they can better support them. However, as long as our society continues to have large socioeconomic disparities, we will continue to see not only a class-based learning gap, but a class-based discipline gap, as well.

Modern School
http://modeducation.blogspot.com/2012/03/parsing-black-white-school-suspension_22.html

9 replies, 1263 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Parsing the Black-White School Suspension Gap (Original post)
Modern School Mar 2012 OP
RandySF Mar 2012 #1
knitter4democracy Mar 2012 #2
knitter4democracy Mar 2012 #3
RandySF Mar 2012 #5
knitter4democracy Mar 2012 #7
RandySF Mar 2012 #4
Modern School Mar 2012 #6
mzteris Mar 2012 #8
Modern School Mar 2012 #9

Response to Modern School (Original post)

Fri Mar 23, 2012, 12:37 AM

1. Question.

Is it established that African American and Latino students being suspended for such offenses as assaults and fighting whereas white students are not being punished for the same things?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RandySF (Reply #1)

Fri Mar 23, 2012, 08:34 AM

2. From what I've seen, it depends on the school.

The school I'm in now, definitely not. The school I subbed in last fall, oh my, yes.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Modern School (Original post)

Fri Mar 23, 2012, 08:36 AM

3. It's the poverty, stupid.

I always think that when I start getting told in our mandatory PD sessions that the number one indicator of student achievement is teacher engagement. I'm going to go with the decades of data saying it's poverty say otherwise.

We are told to put demands in request form, btw. If I give commands, then I'm being rude and disrespectful, and I can get written up.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to knitter4democracy (Reply #3)

Fri Mar 23, 2012, 11:12 AM

5. My current experience.

My son goes to a school in which 80% of students are eligible for free or reduce lunches. Almost all are Asian, Latino or other minority groups. Whenever I help watch the playground during Noon recess, there is a core of four kids out of a group of 60 who take up most of my time because of fighting, pushing and taunting other kids. Last night I got a note from the teacher that, while in class, two of them twisted my son's arm behind his back and punched him in the stomach. I'm not concerned about their race or economic status, I want them disciplined.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RandySF (Reply #5)

Sat Mar 24, 2012, 10:01 AM

7. That's any school anywhere regardless of race or socioeconomic status.

Bullies are everywhere, and that percentage is actually pretty low on the playground. I wonder why the school hasn't done anything about them yet.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Modern School (Original post)


Response to Modern School (Original post)

Fri Mar 23, 2012, 11:50 AM

6. Depends on school

I have to agree. I've taught at several schools and it varies dramatically. What is perhaps most important, however, is the tone set by administrators in terms of having a fair and equitable policy that is consistently enforced. I have definitely seen racist enforcement, but this has been pretty rare.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Modern School (Original post)

Sun Mar 25, 2012, 12:24 PM

8. Yes and no.

While I agree that poverty plays a huge role in some of the behaviour and perceptions, race is still a large part of the problem.

A poor white kid is treated "better" than a poor black or hispanic kid.

A middle class black kid is treated differently from the middle class white kids.

There IS disparate treatment based solely on race. Not economic conditions. Teacher expectations, detentions, suspensions, grading, tolerance for certain behaviours, consequences doled out differently for the same infractions.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to mzteris (Reply #8)

Mon Mar 26, 2012, 09:03 PM

9. Sometimes race, Sometimes not

Poor white kids get treated differently then affluent white kids (or affluent Hispanic and black kids)

I concede in my piece that race does play a role and racism exists in our school systems.
However, class also plays a role in how discipline is meted out.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread