HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Economy & Education » Economy (Group) » Patent Reform, System Sho...

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 07:56 PM

 

Patent Reform, System Should Be Abolished, Fed Economists Say

I'm not saying I agree with this, but I find it interesting

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/05/patent-reform-economists_n_2623537.html


Two economists at the St. Louis Federal Reserve published a paper arguing to abolish the American patent system, saying there's "no evidence" patents improve productivity and that they have a "negative" effect on "innovation."

...

Patents are designed to encourage innovation by granting inventors long-term monopolies on new products. In recent years, however, several innovators in high-tech sectors have complained that the large volume of vague patents has become a major barrier to innovation. When start-ups attempt to unveil a new product, they risk violating a broad, obscure patent.

"Our preferred policy solution is to abolish patents entirely," the paper's authors, economists Michele Boldrin and David K. Levine, wrote. They conclude that problems with patents in fact run much deeper than many critics of the recent system have emphasized.

"The historical and international evidence suggests that while weak patent systems may mildly increase innovation with limited side effects, strong patent systems retard innovation with many negative side effects," Boldrin and Levine wrote. "More generally, the initial eruption of innovations leading to the creation of a new industry—from chemicals to cars, from radio and television to personal computers and investment banking—is seldom, if ever, born out of patent protection and is instead the fruit of a competitive environment."

9 replies, 904 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Patent Reform, System Should Be Abolished, Fed Economists Say (Original post)
naaman fletcher Feb 2013 OP
House of Roberts Feb 2013 #1
Faryn Balyncd Feb 2013 #2
PoliticAverse Feb 2013 #3
tama Feb 2013 #4
bemildred Feb 2013 #5
arendt Feb 2013 #6
sendero Feb 2013 #7
snot Feb 2013 #8
hepkat Feb 2013 #9

Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 08:31 PM

1. Where would we be on electric vehicles

if Chevron hadn't been able to tie up use of nickel hydride batteries with their acquisition of the Ovshinsky patent? I cringe at the thought of oil companies being able to patent new energy technologies, just to keep them from competing with petroleum.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 08:48 PM

2. This is important. Patent law has been hijacked to the extent that it is unjust & counter-productive

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Faryn Balyncd (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:55 PM

3. Especially in the area of software patents. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:10 PM

4. It's obvious

 

Sharing information is good. Artificial restriction and scarcity of information is bad. Especially when copying information nothing is taken and lost, only shared and gained. The *only* motive for copyright and patent right is EGO, and that's fucking wrong master, though quite OK as servant and cool to have around. In MY most humble opinion ...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 09:21 AM

5. Yep, there was a time it was good for something, but that was long ago now.

Now it's a racket.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Sat Feb 9, 2013, 11:24 PM

6. Yes the patent system has been hijacked, but...

completely eliminating patents will only lock in corporate control.

Any small inventor (or even small company) with a good idea will be forced to sell out to a large corporation at a low price, because there will be NO protection at all.

The patent problem has been caused by bullshit like business method patents, software patents, patenting nature (i.e., the infamous BRCA2 cancer test patent), big corporations acquiring massive patent portfolios strictly for the purpose of litigation, patent trolls like Nathan Myhrvold (another gift from Microsoft ), and other OBVIOUS and fairly RECENT over-reaches of the patent system paid for by corrupt corporate control of the political system.

Get rid of the bullshit, and the patent system becomes a level playing field again.

An honest patent system does what the founding fathers wanted: it encourages innovation.

Abolishing that system will ruin innovation, which is all America has going for it.

The linked story is just more garbage from our corporate masters: "We wrecked the system, so now you should let us do as we damn well please."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Sun Feb 10, 2013, 07:32 PM

7. The patent system is completely dysfunctional....

.... with patents being routinely handed out for stuff that has been around forever. And stuff that is completely obvious. I agree with these guys, probably not for exactly the reasons they state.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 01:28 AM

8. Copyright has also become monstrous.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to naaman fletcher (Original post)

Sun Feb 17, 2013, 06:08 PM

9. There should be much more popular conversation about IP

 

Intellectual Property is so central to advanced capitalism that it should be an issue everyone is talking about. Yet it remains largely undiscussed with perhaps the issue of piracy.

Can anyone recommend some good reading on these topics. Especially the economics of intellectual property?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread