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Wed Jan 30, 2013, 03:53 PM

Hillary Clinton 'optimistic' about LatAm, expects soon end of Cuban 'dictatorship' lauds Mexico..

Previously she said that they're basically waiting for the Castros, or maybe just Fidel to die.

Although I could be cynical here it does seem like they are seeing the changes going on in Cuba, and that possibly behind the scenes agreements are going on so that Cuba fits their idea of a "non-dictatorship".

http://www.buenosairesherald.com/article/122913/clinton-optimistic-about-latam-expects-soon-end-of-cuban-dictatorship

Former US Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, said to be optimistic about the future of democracy in Latin America, and assured that she's still working with President Barack Obama in order to outline "the best proposals for the region."

“I’m working with President Obama on some new initiatives that will show the entire world how much we care about our nearest neighbors.”

“There are many reasons for being optimistic about the institutionalization of democracy in Latin America. It has shown a robust economical growth since the 2008 international financial crisis, plus levels of poverty have been reduced.”

To end, Clinton, who’s seen as a potential presidential candidate for 2016, also remembered that “Unfortunately there is still a dictatorship in Cuba, but we expect it to end shortly.”

http://www.state.gov/secretary/rm/2013/01/203452.htm

QUESTION: Hi, Ms. Clinton. Well, it’s a pleasure to have you here. And since we have you here, I would like to ask you about democracy. Okay. Latin America, it’s currently experiencing an economic breakthrough that has helped most country in the region reduce poverty. However, it is not clear if this economic progress has actually strengthened our democracies.

So now with that in mind, the question would be: How do you evaluate the diverse democracies in our region, and how do you see our future?

SECRETARY CLINTON: I think I see a lot of progress, but still work that needs to be done. If you look at Colombia, you are not the country you were 15 years ago. You have consolidated democracy. You – I know President Santos is attempting to try to negotiate a peace agreement so that people will turn away from violence and participate politically. In Mexico, we see great economic growth but also a very vibrant political system in the last election. In Brazil, similarly, we see the same kind of trends. There are others that you can point to.

But there are some outliers. Unfortunately, we still have a dictatorship in Cuba, which we hope will change soon. We have democratic challenges in other countries in Latin America. But overall, I think that progress has been made and you have to stay the course. It doesn’t happen quickly, but there is great reason to be quite optimistic about the institutionalization of democracy throughout Latin America.

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Reply Hillary Clinton 'optimistic' about LatAm, expects soon end of Cuban 'dictatorship' lauds Mexico.. (Original post)
flamingdem Jan 2013 OP
Mika Jan 2013 #1
flamingdem Jan 2013 #2
joshcryer Feb 2013 #4
Mika Feb 2013 #5
naaman fletcher Feb 2013 #6
Mika Feb 2013 #7
joshcryer Feb 2013 #9
naaman fletcher Feb 2013 #10
joshcryer Feb 2013 #8
Peace Patriot Jan 2013 #3

Response to flamingdem (Original post)

Wed Jan 30, 2013, 07:51 PM

1. There can be no person w/ the name Castro on any ballot in Cuba ...

... for the US to recognize Cuba diplomatically, and for the end of the congressional aspects of the sanctions.

If i remember correctly, that is one of the clauses for recognition in Helms-Burton.


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Response to Mika (Reply #1)

Thu Jan 31, 2013, 01:53 AM

2. That's interesting

It goes to show it's all a family feud kind of thing. I suppose Mariela is included in that list.

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Response to Mika (Reply #1)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 01:33 PM

4. The US won't accept the Cuban ballot until candidates can campaign.

Helms-Burton doesn't actually make that distinction it just says "until Cuba is a democracy." The ability for candidates to campaign seems to be the defining factor there.

Though of course they can't campaign in China or other countries that we are friends with either, so we're still hypocritical on that count.

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Response to joshcryer (Reply #4)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 04:08 PM

5. Candidates can and do campaign.

Cuba's difference is that no national party can select, nor campaign for, nor fund the campaigns of any candidates.

The US's stance is ridiculous and corrupt.

I see that you're right back at the tiresome and over worn bullshit --> again <-- (as demonstrated in DU thread linked below).


Here's an old thread ...

Electoral Process Continues Smoothly Nationwide (Election season kickoff in Cuba)
http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=405x31936

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Response to Mika (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 04:18 PM

6. thanks

 

So, could Yoani Sanchez, for example, campaign for office? What offices?

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Response to naaman fletcher (Reply #6)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 05:08 PM

7. Yes. She is over 16, and no felony criminal record.

As long as she could get nominated, elected, and then ratified by at least 50%+1 of the electorate in the particular district represented by any of the municipal, provincial, or national assemblies that she chose to run for.

Few would vote for US paid stool pigeons in Cuba, though.



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Response to Mika (Reply #7)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 08:36 PM

9. Hah, you already condition it on her nomination!

She can't campaign to be nominated!

She can't say "I would like to be a delegate." Walk door to door talking to constituents, and earn their vote. That is why it is undemocratic. Only those who are true revolutionaries can get nominated! The fact that she's been slandered as a counter-revolutionary by the Cuban media already disqualifies her. She can never be nominated under the current system.

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Response to Mika (Reply #7)

Sat Feb 2, 2013, 12:16 PM

10. How do you get nominated? nt

 

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Response to Mika (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 08:34 PM

8. Yeah, we've been over this, where I quoted Cuban electoral code.

Which you subsequently ignored.

http://www.democraticunderground.com/11085466

Cuba has already moved to make the Varela Project's reforms: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varela_Project

(Privatization, free association.)

You are simply flat out wrong that candidates can campaign. When Eliecer called Ricardo Alarcon out about the fact that the Cuban people don't have any real connection to their candidates it tells the real story here.

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Response to flamingdem (Original post)

Thu Jan 31, 2013, 08:20 AM

3. U.S. Sec'y of State: "...how much we care about our nearest neighbors."

Ye gods.

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