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Sat Sep 8, 2012, 01:05 AM

I had to get a new monitor recently, Linux friendly, and a keyboard that would work with my

PS/2 port to access my BIOS at boot (if I needed to). I searched a lot, wanted something reasonably priced, etc. I'm currently running Mint 13, with Cinnamon. A very impressive OS to me.

OK, so here's the monitor I found ... Samsung 23.6" SyncMaster LCD Monitor Model E2420L. I picked it up locally on sale for $160. I'm not doing gaming, etc. I just wanted something that was clear to replace my tube-type graphics monitor which suddenly went out of focus.

This monitor worked well with my Nvidia video card, the drivers were available and I've been blown away by the quality of this monitor for the price.

The keyboard is my second one. I first tried a USB one, all was fine, but then I found I could not access my BIOS at boot. So, I learned PS/2 keyboards are being phased out of production. And a USB to PS/2 adapter did not work. I Found a Kensington "Keyboard for Life, Standard Keyboard USB/PS/2. Manuf. Model: 64370. This one is great and works fine with PS/2 or USB.

Just my experience ...


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Reply I had to get a new monitor recently, Linux friendly, and a keyboard that would work with my (Original post)
RKP5637 Sep 2012 OP
TreasonousBastard Sep 2012 #1
RKP5637 Sep 2012 #3
xsheba97 Sep 2012 #2
sir pball Sep 2012 #4
RKP5637 Sep 2012 #5
greenwoodp Sep 2012 #6
RKP5637 Sep 2012 #7
2ndAmForComputers Sep 2012 #8
RKP5637 Sep 2012 #9

Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Sat Sep 8, 2012, 02:26 AM

1. I've been having trouble finding ps/2 keyboards and...

rodents. Some machines I've had seemed to have interrupt problems with usb and were flaky. Besides, you only get so many usb ports before you have to add a card or adapter.

(2 printers, 2 external hard drives, one scanner, one Nook, and a couple of other occasional things use my 5 usb ports)

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Response to TreasonousBastard (Reply #1)

Sat Sep 8, 2012, 08:57 AM

3. This keyboard, very difficult to find (PS/2-USB), I got at Micro Center

http://www.microcenter.com/product/228074/Keyboard_for_Life It's a nice Keyboard for $10. Works for PS/2 and USB and it is expressively stated as such in its specs.

I had always thought one could use an USB to PS/2 adapter on any USB keyboard, but apparently not. Not all USB keyboards can be adapted to PS/2. Also, it seems some older motherboards do not handle USB to access the BIOS during boot. I think I'll pick up another keyboard as a spare. There have been a lot of users having similar problems with PS/2 stuff. The weird part was the keyboard was fine on USB after boot, but with no BIOS access during boot. (... back, just ordered another one for pickup.)

The Samsung 23.6" SyncMaster LCD Monitor Model E2420L monitor is incredible, especially for the price. ... and works absolutely OK with my Linux system. Not one problem so far!

I ran out of SATA ports. I use the two motherboard SATA ports for my drives, but I needed one more for my SATA CD/DVD R/W drive. I tried a couple of expansion cards in my ePCI slot and that did not allow me to access the CD/DVD R/W drive after boot, although I could see the drive as recognized.

After a lot of research I found a really great card for PCI slot expansion to four internal SATA ports and it's expressively stated in the spec. that its internal BIOS works with Linux, and that it's a stand-alone card. It is not dependent on the OS or motherboard BIOS. I got one used off eBay from a guy that seems to deal with a lot of quality used parts. The card is a "PROMISE SATA300 TX4 4-PORT PCI SATA II CONTROLLER 300". His eBay store is "Affordable Upgrades."

This stuff really works well.

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Sat Sep 8, 2012, 04:06 AM

2. Spam deleted by Warren DeMontague (MIR Team)

 

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Sun Sep 9, 2012, 09:56 PM

4. Unicomp PS/2 boards..

..are the successor to the legendary IBM Model M "clicky" keyboard; the things are utterly bombproof, 25+ year lifespan is common. They aren't cheap ($79 for a basic model) but one will probably last until they finally drop the PS/2 port.

http://pckeyboard.com/page/UltraClassic/UNI0P46

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Response to sir pball (Reply #4)

Sun Sep 9, 2012, 10:11 PM

5. Amazing, and they actually have k/b parts, never see that. Thanks, I'll save this!!! n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Wed Sep 12, 2012, 02:21 PM

6. get a new monitor recently, and a keyboard that would work !!

 


I'd always assumed one particular could use an USB to PS/2 adapter on any USB keyboard, but apparently not. Not all USB keyboards is usually adapted to PS/2. Also, it appears some more mature motherboards never manage USB to obtain the BIOS throughout boot. I do think I'll get yet another keyboard like a spare. There have been lots of users possessing identical problems with PS/2 stuff. The odd portion was the keyboard was high-quality on USB following boot, but with no BIOS accessibility through boot. The Samsung 23.6" SyncMaster Lcd Watch Model E2420L keep an eye on is amazing, specifically for the value. ... and operates certainly Ok with my Linux technique. Not a single trouble to date!

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Response to greenwoodp (Reply #6)

Wed Sep 12, 2012, 03:38 PM

7. ??? n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Original post)

Wed Sep 12, 2012, 08:24 PM

8. IS there such a thing as a monitor that's NOT Linux friendly?

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Response to 2ndAmForComputers (Reply #8)

Wed Sep 12, 2012, 09:46 PM

9. Yes, some monitors might be dependent on the sw package they are distributed with ... This monitor,

for example, can be set up by the Windows sw that ships with it and requires, of course, a Windows OS. However, it can also be configured manually with the config. buttons on the panel. Of course the graphics card needs to be supported by Linux, the Nvidia card is friendly for that. I did load the Windows CD that came with this monitor and opened it with Wine, but I really couldn't do any sw control of the monitor ... but the config. buttons on the panel worked fine. Samsung states, for example, on their website the following for this monitor.

"All Samsung Monitors are Plug and Play compatible. Plug and Play means that your operating system (Windows, Mac and most versions of Linux and UNIX) along with a properly installed video card will detect your monitor and will know the supported resolutions and refresh rates."
http://www.samsung.com/us/support/owners/product/LS24CLLSB/ZA

Long story short, it's getting far easier than it used to be.


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