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Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:04 AM

Can someone explain IP addresses to me?

Does the ISP's modem and your personal router have different IP addresses?

I'm wondering because I know it's possible to create the semblance of a static ip address for a device in your home based on your location IP number.

What puzzles me is that the number is the same for everyone. Its that number that begins with 192. So, if we all have the same number, is it the MAC that makes each and every one of us unique?

I don't understand how it's possible for me to type in that IP address on a computer and get the correct login page for a device I have at my home (In this case, a DVR), when we all have basically the same IP address. Unless this only turns up because I've already programmed my laptop and IPhone to recognize it, though I'm not even sure how I was so clever. I must have input the numbers in during my sleep.

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Arrow 44 replies Author Time Post
Reply Can someone explain IP addresses to me? (Original post)
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 OP
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #1
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #2
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #3
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #4
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #5
Gore1FL Feb 2013 #29
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #30
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #6
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #7
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #9
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #8
Duer 157099 Feb 2013 #10
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #12
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #14
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #16
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #11
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #13
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #15
Lenomsky Feb 2013 #17
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #18
wandy Feb 2013 #19
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #20
wandy Feb 2013 #21
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #22
wandy Feb 2013 #23
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #24
wandy Feb 2013 #25
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #26
wandy Feb 2013 #27
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #28
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #31
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #32
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #33
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #34
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #35
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #37
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #39
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #40
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #41
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #42
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #43
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #44
discntnt_irny_srcsm Feb 2013 #36
Baitball Blogger Feb 2013 #38

Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:08 AM

1. They are not all the same

In fact, they are all different! LOL

They may start with the same number, much as the prefix to a phone number is the same for many people.

Hold on, I'll go find more info...

Edit: yes, the MAC identifies local equipment on your network
Edit2: and most hardware will identify it's own MAC to your router, or whatever other smart equipment you have that asks for it...

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:25 AM

2. Here, they explain it better than I can

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reserved_IP_addresses

In particular:

192.168.0.0/16 192.168.0.0
192.168.255.255 65536 No Used for local communications within a private network as specified by RFC 1918.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #2)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:32 AM

3. This is what I mean.

Type in 192.168.0.0 and you'll find that everyone uses it. It is a generic IP address for private homes. The last two numbers just identifies the devices in your home.

So, it must be our MACs that provide some semblance of privacy, right?

It's important to my program because I port forwarded the device using that number. And yet, when I type my IP locator number on my laptop I directly get my login page for my DVR. It's like magic.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #3)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:36 AM

4. Yes, the MAC is the machine ID number, unique

It's like after the IP designates your router, then you enter your own private IP universe, sort of. Know what I mean?

The world can connect to your router, or any device on the net, but your router is the gatekeeper to the devices you connect to it.

Your router knows the MAC addresses of any devices you have attached or associated to it. It just knows

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #4)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:39 AM

5. magic and math go hand in hand. Who knew?

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #3)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 12:28 AM

29. Think of it this way:

Let's assume you have a wireless aware phone, a laptop, a desktop, a PS3, a tablet and a wireless printer. For ease, we'll say they have the following IP Addresses:

192.168.100.1 Phone
192.168.100.2 Laptop
192.168.100.3 Desktop
192.168.100.4 PS3
192.168.100.5 Tablet
192.168.100.6 Printer
192.168.100.7 Neighbor who is riding your bandwidth
192.168.100.254 Router

Think of this little network as a town. 192.168 is essentially a placeholder It generically means "this town." for this example. the 3rd byte is the street. Desktop is at House #3 on 100th street in this neighborhood.

The router is a post office at the corner. All communication internal to the neighborhood is handled there. The post office has access to a pony express office., It is usually on the side street of the post office and might have an address of 192.168.1.254. The pony express has an IP address that can communicate outside of the neighborhood.

On the outside This town that the townsfolk simple call "192.168" for short is known as "168.94.57.21" (I just pulled that number out of my ass and have no idea what it is.) to the outside world.

Sometime, click on start. Type cmd in the search bar. Type tracert www.democraticunderground.com (or tracert whatever address you'd like). When it works, you can see how things are getting from here to there.

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Response to Gore1FL (Reply #29)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 01:01 AM

30. Hi Gore1FL

I understand the LAN addresses. I managed to access the video stream of my DVR within the LAN radius. Which is to say, as long as I'm home I can access it from the wireless connections on my laptop and Iphone because I'm directly connected to the home network.

But, today, when I left to go to the dentist, I couldn't access the video streaming on my Iphone. It gave me a DVR login error. I assumed it was because I was using the LAN IP Address, which in your example, would be like 192.168.100.4 when it should be some outside number (WAN) which I haven't yet figured out how to access.

I realize that I'm probably looking at a DynDNS number, which makes me a little nervous because, for the first month that I had the security DVR, my technician set me up with an IP Address that allowed me to access the stream through the internet--but I never learned how he did it. If he set up a DynDNS number for me, then he had direct access into my network without my knowledge. I know he photographed the DVR page which contained all the pertinent info, like my DNS preferred server, Ip Address, Gateway and Mac address. But he doesn't have my router name or password.

I want to understand everything that he did, so I can change as many variables as possible.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:41 AM

6. I access my home devices by port forwarding...

...as you do for your security DVR.

I enter my home IP address and a port number. The IP address gets me to the external address for my modem/router. The router then takes over looks at the port number and forwards my message to the IP on my home network according to the port forwarding table.

There are what are called "private IP" ranges. IP v4 addresses consist of 4 numbers between 0 and 255. The common private range for home routers is 192.168.X.Y where X and Y are assigned to each device on your network usually by the router. By convention ISPs do traffic addresses in the private ranges. If a device on your network at home sends data to an address in the private range not found on your network, and it is sent to your ISP, it will be (or at least should be) discarded.

The MAC addresses play a role at a lower network level than IP addresses. My laptop, when I work at home gets the address 192.168.1.5 from my router. When I'm in the office, my laptop gets a completely different IP on that LAN but it keeps the same MAC address.

Hope this helps.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #6)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:44 AM

7. ^^^^^^ this

Well done.

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #7)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:49 AM

9. TY

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #6)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 11:49 AM

8. There must be something automatic going on with my login page because I only need to

type in the IP address. The login page includes the port number--automatically.

I suppose, if I wanted to be absolutely secure I would change the port number, since it was the number assigned by the technician.

The code to get into the program is only five digits. That's why I'm trying to find out how all the other pieces work.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #8)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 12:03 PM

10. Where does http://192.168.0.1 take you?

Do you know how to get into your router's admin page?

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Response to Duer 157099 (Reply #10)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 12:10 PM

12. No where.

I looked and the number I type in is the actual device IP address.

The router's admin page I get in by hitting a Cisco Icon.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #12)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 12:20 PM

14. Most Cisco routers...

...default to 192.168.1.1 as do most Netgear routers. I would caution against enabling "remote administration" which would allow you to access your router from outside your home network. Things can get confusing in short order.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #14)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 12:21 PM

16. I'll look for it and make sure I didn't do it accidentally.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #8)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 12:05 PM

11. I would infer...

...that the app you use to access your DVR while away from home has retained the IP:port info the same as it may retain www . google . com. This probably brings up the DVR login page which wants that 5 digit code. Using an obscure port number is a wise security precaution.

Port numbers range from 0 to 65535. Some of these are in common use by some applications and protocols so its best to pick one not already used.

< http://www.webopedia.com/quick_ref/portnumbers.asp > Here's a short list. I generally use numbers between 4096 and 65535.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #11)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 12:12 PM

13. Bingo!

That's what I'm looking for.

It's a scary proposition to change the ports, but I know the two places where I should be able to do it without problems. In the router, and in the dVR.

Thanks again!

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #13)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 12:20 PM

15. You're very welcome

Good luck

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 01:49 PM

17. ISP <> Modem <> your Home Network.

Modem receives an external IP from the ISP this provides internet access. Some providers offer static IP's while others offer Dynamic IP's however the lease time for a Dynamic IP is generally weeks if not months so your external IP will seldom change if ever.

Modem acts as a Switch/Router and allocates private non-routable IP's to your devices (192.168.x.y as a firm rule). The login IP for your Modem will normally be 192.168.1.1 (from inside you home network) although depends on the modem manufacturer and further devices added will be allocated in numeric sequence thus 2nd will be 192.168.1.2 etc

You normally must port forward on the Modem to access attached devices from the external network for this you need to know the Modem external IP which will you can get from the Modem i.e. log in and you should see it. Allocate a port number in port forwarding and enter the local IP address of the device. Ensure you have a secure passphrase for the Modem at all times. Use web browser point at you external IP say 92.22.22.01:1024 (IPort number) and your login screen should pop up.

If you find you have many devices that are switched ON/OFF regular their internal IP's may change in which case you can allocated static IP's for each device on your network.

Others solution is VNC for those that want to access their PC remotely I'm unsure which offer end to end encryption but go for the one that does.

http://www.tightvnc.com/
http://www.uvnc.co.uk/

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Response to Lenomsky (Reply #17)

Tue Feb 5, 2013, 02:15 PM

18. Thank you Lenomsky! I could actually follow this!

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 06:22 AM

19. And probably a bit more information than you wanted.........

If everyone's (for the most part) home network starts with 192.n.n.n , who controls the other IP addresses.

IANA is responsible for global coordination of the Internet Protocol addressing systems, as well as the Autonomous System Numbers used for routing Internet traffic.

http://www.iana.org/numbers

At this link they show IpV4 assignments.
http://www.iana.org/assignments/ipv4-address-space/ipv4-address-space.xml

For example 003.n.n.n would be associated with GE, 009.n.n.n would be associated with IBM and so forth.

For looking around you're household network Advanced IP Scanner is a freeware tool that provides a report of current addresses.
http://www.advanced-ip-scanner.com/

If you're network contains both static and dynamic IPs this tool provides what IP address is associated with what hardware (MAC) address. Although it is almost imposable for the advrage person to encounter two NICs having the same MAC address, my luck decided that it would happen here. Using dinamic IP all hell breaks loose. It was Advanced IP Scanner that pointed to the problem.

Hope this helps. Have fun.

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Response to wandy (Reply #19)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 08:33 AM

20. Thanks wandy!

Sounds like a helpful resource to see if the streams are crossing!

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #20)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 08:46 AM

21. Never cross the streams......



It is a disaster of biblical proportions.
Gozer the Gozerian eats you're personal cloud.
Dogs and cats start living togther.

You know the rest.

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Response to wandy (Reply #21)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 08:49 AM

22. It was so easy to use!

I already ran it. It said I had over two hundred live Ip addresses, though less than a dozen devices were attached to them.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #22)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:12 AM

23. Ok try this........

Some, I'll call them "givers of IP addresses" not only must keep tract of the addresses but will not reuse an address they have given out. If using dynamic addressing you're PC doesn't OWN the IP address, it is a lease.
After an amount of time the lease must be renewed. A new address is provided. You can see this in the Windows event logs.
The "giver of addresses" should free up the old address for later use. Some do, some don't. Not a problem.

Gently shut down all attached devices.
Gently power down the "giver of addresses".
Count to 10.
Power on the "giver of addresses".
Count to 10
Power on the attached devices.

You should now see fewer IP addresses.
Do note that I didn't use when I said have fun.
Enjoy.


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Response to wandy (Reply #23)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 09:19 AM

24. Will the giver of addresses change my IP?

I am trying to avoid that because one of my devices is a DVR that is streaming video. I don't want to lose that IP address because I "locked" it in the Cisco router in the DHCP section.

But, please explain why drops those addresses?

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #24)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 10:09 AM

25. I should have warned you. This gets complicated. Still fun, so......

Usually an attached device can use either DHCP or a static IP address. Remaining a bit wimisical, when a device is powered on it goes.... "ARP"!
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc758357(v=ws.10).aspx
Now this is where it "gets complicated". Networks vary by virtue of device capabilities and user setup.
Not being their I'll explain what happens here......
When the PC I'm typing on is powered on it yells......
ARP! Give me an IP address. (Dynamic address)
When my printer powers on it yells....
ARP! This is my IP address. (static address)
My "giver of addresses" a Qwest Q1000 graciously handles both cases.
This is where it gets complicated.....

If Your DVR can do static (pre defined) Ip andresses
If you have defined a static address
If you're "giver of addresses" works reasonably.
Then
All should be fine
Else
Right about here it's best to read the free books. Without having the books in front of me it's hard to be of much more help.
Some "givers of addresses" can assign (by configuration) a specific IP address to a specific MAC address. This is OK fine.
In this case when the DVR yells.
ARP! Give me an IP address. The giver of addresses will say "sure" and it will always be this one.

Sometimes help comes down to a reading assignment.

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Response to wandy (Reply #25)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 01:14 PM

26. I just went to the dentist, and I think I found a flaw in the way I set up the port fowarding.

I gave my DVR a static IP address using the Cisco router software. The same number is input in the DVR.

I also said that anything coming out of the DVR should go through a certain port server. We'll say Port 9230 for now.

So, this all works when I'm at home and my Iphone and laptop login with the iPAddress of the dVR.

However, I found the flaw in the ointment when I went to the dentist. I couldn't access my DVR, because I'm not using an IP Address that is recognized by the internet. It only works for my home network.

Am I right? So, I have to find the IP address of my router, don't I?

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #26)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 03:48 PM

27. Are you trying to access YOU'RE network from a REMOTE location?

That is a horse of a very different color.
A whole lot of 'security stuff' is trying to prevent you from doing that. The same 'stuff' that prevents ME from accessing YOU'RE DVR.
You wouldn't want that.
If you have this working OK in you're home network the best bet would be to ask you're ISP for their recommendation.
Yes, as someone pointed out their is software that will allow access to a remote PC using the Internet.
This is where ports and firewalls (yours and possibly you're ISPs) get involved.
Something on you're network (possibly the DVR) would need to perform actions similar to a web server.
If it's working on you're network ask you're ISP for their recommendation.

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Response to wandy (Reply #27)

Wed Feb 6, 2013, 03:53 PM

28. Okay. I can live with my situation for now.

But learning more and more how networking works, will only make it easier for me to get it to operate the way I want it to. I may only do the remote access features when we're traveling, for instance. I know the technician had done this once before. I just don't know how he did it. I'll learn, little by little so I can control all the variable.s

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #26)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 02:24 AM

31. Hello again



Page 40 of the manual explains Dynamic DNS setup which allows you to use a web address to get to your home network.

http://homedownloads.cisco.com/downloads/userguide/1224694474459/EA-Series_UG_Full_3425-00125C_EN_FR-CA_Web.pdf

I use http://dyn.com/dns/ my address looks like name_I_pick.dyndns.info
I add the colon and port to the end and I can access my devices at home from anywhere (almost).
Let me know if you have problems.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #31)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 07:22 AM

32. Hey you!

I'll check out your link. But I think I found the same thing called DVR DDNS Support Application Note (DynDNS)

What I'm reading is that I'll be paying $15.00 a year for the service, which isn't too bad.

The only bummer is that it says that the instructions are only for DVRs with Build nu. xxxxx and my DVR is about 200 units less than that.

Thanks again! You rule!

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #32)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 09:55 AM

33. Well...

...your DVR shouldn't need to know about the DDNS if it's implemented properly in your router.

Now, aside from the one I already mentioned, there are services like:
http://www.noip.com/services/managed_dns/free_dynamic_dns.html

...which are supposed to be 100% free.
I signup for their service just now and it seems to work fine.

Just out of curiosity, are any of your PCs running a "Professional" version of Windows?

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #33)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 10:04 AM

34. A freebie!

About the DDNS (I assume it's the same as a DNS) Remember all that commotion I had over the email problems? They referred me to DNS server 8.8.4.4. which I've come to learn is a public Google DNS. Which makes sense that it would work better because the email that is getting all the alerts is a gmail account.

I am almost sure I don't have a Professional version of Windows. I suspect that's why other features aren't working well, either. For example, I can't take photographs from my laptop and I can't record playback from the laptop either. But I can make backups on a thumbdrive from the main unit.

I was going to try to get Active X installed to see if that would help.

I think I also have to update Java, but haven't yet because of all the Java scare.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #34)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 10:32 AM

35. A wise move

I'm staying away from java for a bit until all that is resolved.

I ask about Windows Pro such as XP Professional or Win7 Pro because they incorporate a feature called remote desktop that I use a good bit. Remote Desktop:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/878451
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/products/features/remote-desktop-connection

This feature lets you log into another pc and operate it remotely, from across the room or across the country. From a pc on your home network you only need the IP of the computer you want to connect to. From the internet you need to add another port to your router's port forwarding table. Remote Desktop works on port 3389. Since that port is commonly known I change the port forwarding when I'm not using it to an unconnected IP. It does open the PC to which you forward to the outside. Theoretically, if you had a PC with a very weak password or none at all, an malicious outsider could log in and have full access. For that reason, it's best to check in the control panel > user accounts to make sure all users have strong passwords:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/online-privacy/passwords-create.aspx
Remote desktop client is on all versions of Windows but only the Pro versions often the server app so while you can connect using mostly any version, you can only connect to PCs with Pro versions.

But maybe look into that when your DVR issues are settled.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #35)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 11:08 AM

37. LOL! One problem at a time!

It only gets better and better, doesn't it? LOL!

I still cannot understand how my technician was able to port forward the video stream to an IP address that I don't even have on any home computer. I use to log in through 142.196.216.xxx. (The xxx=813) I was able to access the video when I was on an errand, using wireless and cellular on my Iphone.

But I completely lost access to that log in page when I changed the password on my Cisco router and was never able to regain in.

And, now, when I do an IP chicken, I come up with an IP address that begins with 97.

Will the real IP Address please stand up?

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #37)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 12:41 PM

39. There are some complications here.

At this point I'm sure you're saying, "No, ya' think!"

Well, here's the issue: there are 2 sides to your router: the internet or WAN side and the intranet or LAN. Each one has a different IP address. The WAN or internet side is assigned a public IP by your ISP. The LAN side address I think you've said is 192.168.1.1. Your public address can change. The IP you gave is owned by Brighthouse:

http://whois.arin.net/rest/net/NET-142-196-0-0-2/pft who, I think, you've mentioned. They apparently own all of the IPs starting with 142.196.___.___. They probably own (or lease) many other ranges as well like a range that starts with 97 that you mentioned.

Just like businesses have a main phone number like 321-555-WXYZ. Then you get either a live or automated receptionist that you can give an in house extension to in order to reach someone's desk. The main phone # is like your router's WAN address. The LAN IP is the extension on the desk.

Hope this helps.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #39)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 01:12 PM

40. It does help.

I assume my WAN number is the one that begins with 97.

As for the people who own that range(97) and the 142, could it be any private entrepreneur? OR are they corporations that are regulated by government?

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #40)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 01:55 PM

41. Your WAN IP...

...is what you get from IP chicken. From outside your home network, that will get the data packet to your router. The port number after the WAN IP and colon will be seen and by your router and forwarded according to the port forwarding table.

Private v corporate: the short answer is I don't know. My guess is that either is fine but both are probably regulated. I would image more so by other entities on the net than by the government. I have heard that not playing nice may get you de-peered.

For example, if you bought or leased a single IP (for example 99.98.97.96) and you or someone you allowed access did something (I'm not sure what) to offend another entity (let's say Comcast or IBM) they may respond by altering there gateways to return a 404 error to request originating within or traversing their networks when your IP is accessed. Governments (you can probably surmise which) will sometimes de-peer certain addresses or ranges due to those sites hosting info the governments feel is "dangerous". They enforce this by requiring the gateway owners to set these policies.

FYI: we are fast approaching the limit of my experience. Feel free to ask anything and I'll try to remember to highlight the differences between what I believe is correct and what I know to be fact. If there is something that I say that doesn't checkout, please let me know. One never learns anything quite so well as when you try to teach someone else.

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #41)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 02:29 PM

42. I've got plenty here to work with. However, I can think of one more question,

which probably would make more sense to a Cisco user.

On the DHCP Client list, my DVR did not show up on the table in the beginning. I had to add it on the CISCO software that was installed on my computer. That's how I was able to get the streaming to work on the LAN.

Today I was able to access the linksyssmartwifi website, where you can also make changes to your router. I noticed that my DVR's IP did not show up on the client list. It looks like I have to manually add it there too. The question I have is, would inputting the same data just give me the same results? LAN access, but not WAN access?

It doesn't matter. I'm going to visit the dynamic website next and, hopefully, that will take care of everything.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #42)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 02:53 PM

43. The linksyssmartwifi site...

...looks like it does the same job as the DDNS services/sites I've mentioned. It may be "tuned" a bit better to your router's functionality.

Sine that site and the S/W you downloaded works with your router I would try that first. Check what it says in your router manual. What should be listed on the linksyssmartwifi site should be (I think) the WAN address that you see from home using IP chicken. See page 18 to get a list of the devices and their IPs which are on your LAN.

Then make sure that port forwarding is set correctly so that the port which the DVR listens to is the one forwarded to the DVR's current IP address.

I'll look into the linksyssmartwifi site more when I have a chance.

Cheers

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #43)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 05:40 PM

44. Almost there.

I've changed the port numbers and the passwords and my smartwifi is seeing the dvr. So check that off.

I've managed to fix the WAN issue with my Iphone. I just typed in my WAN number and it took it.

But I think I will still have to get a dynamic number/name for my laptop. I don't think my laptop is as smart as my phone.

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #34)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 10:59 AM

36. BTW...

...DDNS and DNS are not the same.

Routers operate generally to "route" traffic appropriately. When you type a URL into your browser's address bar or click on a bookmark, windows will look in its dns cache (and some other places) to see if it has been told what IP that URL resolves to. If the URL isn't there, windows will construct a message and send it to the IP address of whatever windows has for its DNS resolver. Generally, at home that will be the same as your the address of your internet gateway. Most home networks have their router listed as the internet gateway. When your router gets that message, it will forward it to whatever you've as its DNS resolver. Most often that will be you ISP. However, as we've seen, some ISPs sometimes have issues. To help out with this difficulty there are a number of services that offer public URL resolving. Google's servers' addresses 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4. I use OpenDNS which are at 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220.

This message eventually is transferred to a server that knows the URL you typed or clicked and send the IP address back to your PC. Your PC will send its traffic to the address returned and also, generally, save the IP address and URL name in its cache for further use.

Dynamic DNS, on the other hand, is a subscription service that you signup for. The idea is that most ISPs don't offer home users what are called static IP addresses. If you turn you modem and router off and on, the IP where your home network is seen from the internet can change. This is problematic if your trying to access your devices at home from elsewhere. Besides the fact that even if you have a static IP, it's just easier to remember names than numbers. The DDNS service will register with name servers on the internet. Your router will regularly message the service with which you signed up (the router will need the user name and password for your DDNS account) and let the service know what its external IP is.

Hey, it's all just ones and zeroes, how hard could it be?

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Response to discntnt_irny_srcsm (Reply #36)

Thu Feb 7, 2013, 11:11 AM

38. Every little bit helps.

Thanks for explaining this. I learn a little more with each read.

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