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Wed Oct 24, 2012, 08:31 PM

'Join the queue' for EU membership, Spain tells Alex Salmond

Alex Salmond's chaotic attempts to persuade voters he could take an independent Scotland smoothly into the European Union have suffered another setback, after Spain said Scotland would need to "join the queue" and negotiate as a new member state.

Foreign minister José Manuel García-Margallo told the Spanish senate on Tuesday that an independent Scotland would have to go through a potentially long negotiating process and win the support of all 27 members, including Spain – directly contradicting Salmond's position on EU membership.

"In the hypothetical case of independence, Scotland would have to join the queue and ask to be admitted, needing the unanimous approval of all member states to obtain the status of a candidate country … and to sign the final treaty ," García-Margallo said.

Intensifying the pressure on Salmond, the Spanish foreign minister said Scotland would also need member states to scrutinise its legislation before approving the 35 separate chapters that have to be negotiated before a new member is admitted.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2012/oct/24/scotland-eu-membership-spain

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Reply 'Join the queue' for EU membership, Spain tells Alex Salmond (Original post)
dipsydoodle Oct 2012 OP
DonCoquixote Oct 2012 #1
pennylane100 Oct 2012 #3
LeftishBrit Oct 2012 #5
ProgressiveProfessor Oct 2012 #2
dipsydoodle Oct 2012 #4
tjwmason Oct 2012 #6

Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 09:11 PM

1. and THIS is why the EU is becoming a joke

They let greece in, but places like Scotland, which has a good economy and Turkey, which is also stable, are rejected. Have the ever considered that getting Scotland on board will be a good bulwark agauinst those Eu hating brits?

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Response to DonCoquixote (Reply #1)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 11:41 PM

3. They would run a greater risk of being called a joke if they did not use the same rules for everyone

The Greek economy was not in the tank when they applied to join, and the reason Turkey has not been accepted yet is they have not shown enough progress in ensuring their laws comply with the EU in the area of human rights. This is a good thing, as if and when Turkey does comply with these changes necessary to join the union, their citizens will benefit with having much stronger legal protections.

If Scotland emerges as an independent country, why should they be treated any different than other European countries, they have to apply, just like everyone else. Granted, their strong economy and their sound legal system will definitely help their process along more quickly but they must go through the application process just the same.

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Response to DonCoquixote (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 25, 2012, 08:25 AM

5. It's the same rules for all, about admission

Greece did not have a bad economy or severe instability at the time of admission. If it had, it might well not have been admitted at that time.

Scotland has not been 'rejected'. It could only become an EU member if it were an independent country. This may or (more likely) may not be the result of the forthcoming referendum. If it does become an independent country, it can apply like anyone else and will probably be accepted, assuming that it wants membership, and that the EU hasn't broken up by then under the pressures of the economic crisis!

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Wed Oct 24, 2012, 11:23 PM

2. Salmond's reply was absolute denial

Reality is that it is unprecedented and no one knows what will happen.

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Response to ProgressiveProfessor (Reply #2)

Thu Oct 25, 2012, 04:54 AM

4. Spain's mention of the subject was more likely a sideswipe at both Catalonia and the Basques

both of whom seek separation from Spain. Spain is alluding to the fact that acceptance of an application to join the EU requires the agreement of ALL current member states and there is no appeal against a veto by one or more countries - Article 49 covers that beyond all doubt with no room for misinterpretation.

Doubtless Italy will raise the same subject with regard to Venice.

In any previous mention of the subject here in DU I had only assumed that the UK wouldn't veto an application by Scotland : I hadn't accounted for subsequent events elsewhere.

Re-writing Article 49 would also require the agreement of all current member states and hence may be dismissed as unlikely.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Reply #4)

Thu Oct 25, 2012, 03:19 PM

6. Definitely.

That the Spanish government is the only one making comments is significant, and that the Spanish government faces (and strongly opposes) secessionist movements within its own borders is certainly significant.

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