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Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:00 PM

"The New Old-Age Security? A Job" by Tavia Grant at the Globe & Mail

The New Old-Age Security? A Job

by Tavia Grant at the Globe & Mail

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/economy/jobs/the-new-old-age-security-a-job/article8852459/?utm_medium=Newsletter&utm_source=The%20Globe%20and%20Mail&utm_type=text&utm_content=TheGlobeandMail&utm_campaign=101667146

"SNIP.............................................


Bill VanGorder is aware of the irony that he now works longer hours, at the age of 70, than he ever did before he retired.

The former chief executive officer of the Lung Association of Nova Scotia, who spent decades as an executive and fundraiser in the non-profit sector, had expected to retire at age 63 and live off his savings.

Then the recession hit. Markets tumbled, wiping $300 a month in his income from investments a shortfall that pushed him back into the work force.

The Halifax resident now wears many hats, as a business development manager, consultant and owner of a company that distributes Nordic walking poles. Its fulfilling work, he said, even if it fills up his weekends. But he is clear that the decision to go back to work stemmed from economic necessity.


.............................................SNIP"

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Response to applegrove (Original post)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:09 PM

1. Well there but for the grace of God go a whole bunch of us.

I got shit for retirement, my home equity dropped by 67%, my AIG funds by a similar figure.

My parents' estate was devastated, and I have changed jobs too may times to be able to rely on any kind of retirement.

I have a little money in the bank, maybe enough for two years on the street.

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Response to NYC_SKP (Reply #1)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:28 PM

2. I fully intend to work until I am 75. My grandmother worked until she was 80 so I know I can do it.

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Response to applegrove (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:33 PM

3. I do, too. I can't imagine not working. However....

I see far too many people designing their lives around benefits.

They marry for benefits, they stay with shit jobs for the benefits.

I'm guilty of this.

Please, universal care for all!!!!

Still, I would keep working because I love my work.

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Response to NYC_SKP (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:36 PM

4. I use to love to work too. I'm sure I will again.

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Response to applegrove (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:44 PM

5. If our government and economy and society REALLY wanted us to be productive...

They would provide health and family care and JOB MOBILITY so that we could migrate to positions that best fit our interests and skill sets.

I'll bet you and I are in similar places, or have been in the past; I hate my job, can't afford just yet to leave it.

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Response to NYC_SKP (Reply #5)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:50 PM

6. I'm working as a caregiver to my parents. I worry alot that I and the health care aides

will one day not be able to take care of them. One has parkinsons', one had the beginings of altzheimers. So I take it day by day. I do get to cook for them and nurture them a bit. But they are losing mobility. It isn't fun for them getting old either. But we watch a dvd each afternoon which is fun. We are lucky. We have lots and lots of help. But yeah...I miss the good stress of solving work problems that are solvable with affability, creativity or hard work. At least those problems could be solved easily.

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Response to applegrove (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 20, 2013, 11:54 PM

7. We are kindred spirits...

My dad passed yesterday.

He and mom were in their home since 67 until it got too ugly with him molesting the help and mom calling 911. So I put them in a care facility close to my home in October. I was there three times today and at the mortuary this morning, mom is doing OK.
I feel your pain.
How fun that you watch a DVD when you can.
I bring my puppy over to cheer mom up, and she loves the animated movie Open Season.
Now that pops is gone I might be able to go watch some movies with her.
But I also have to work, so it's evenings or weekends.

Take care, applegrove.

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Response to NYC_SKP (Reply #7)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:39 AM

9. Oh I'm so sorry. You've had it much harder than me. My mom occasionally is frustrating. My

dad gets grumpy at times. But usually they are on their best behaviour. I never went through anything with my parents like you did. I'm so sorry you lost your father yesterday. As they say, your relationship to him is changing one more time. (((BIG HUGS))) for you and your mom in this trying time.

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Response to applegrove (Original post)

Thu Feb 21, 2013, 12:02 AM

8. He has a shortfall of $300 a month

and he's working longer hours than before?

So how much is he making now? Three hundred bucks a month to make up for that shortfall? There's a lot of part time jobs out there that pay more.

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