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Tue Oct 16, 2012, 03:57 PM

 

Texas voter registration at all time high.

I saw a story yesterday reporting that Texas voter registrations were at an all time high.

Is there any way to find out the dem/rep distribution of these registrations? We can guess but I prefer data.

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Reply Texas voter registration at all time high. (Original post)
IDoMath Oct 2012 OP
Baitball Blogger Oct 2012 #1
IDoMath Oct 2012 #2
Jane Austin Oct 2012 #3
TexasTowelie Oct 2012 #4
TBF Oct 2012 #5
TexasTowelie Oct 2012 #7
NoPasaran Oct 2012 #6

Response to IDoMath (Original post)

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 03:57 PM

1. What is their cut off period?

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Response to Baitball Blogger (Reply #1)

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 03:59 PM

2. Oct 9

 

All done for the year. Early voting starts monday.

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Response to IDoMath (Original post)

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 04:23 PM

3. Some of our cities are getting

hundreds of people moving there per day, I think.

It would make sense that registrations would go up for that reason alone.

I hope it is more long-time residents signing up, though.

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Response to IDoMath (Original post)

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 04:28 PM

4. I recently registered since I moved during the year.

I did not have to indicate party affiliation when I registered. The registration card is stamped with the party affiliation when you vote in the primary (or runoff if you did not vote in the primary).

Since registration cards are reissued before the primaries, it does allow people from one party to crossover and raid the other party primary to nominate weak candidates. Some people allege that occurred in the Democratic primary of 2008 between Obama and Clinton.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Reply #4)

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 04:55 PM

5. Well - it can go either way

when I volunteered during the 2008 primary there were folks who told me they were caucusing for Obama because they were republicans and hated Hillary. She had solid Latino support and did win our county.

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Response to TBF (Reply #5)

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 05:39 PM

7. That is what I was referring to in my comment for further clarification.

I believe that the Hillary hatred drove a number of votes to the Obama camp during the primary and then the rules concerning how the delegates were allocated afterwards created additional strife. There were also several stories of Republican crossovers during the primary because they perceived Obama as the weaker of the two candidates.

Past history cannot be altered; however, the stronger candidate in 2012 is obvious and the important thing is for President Obama to be reelected next month.

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Response to IDoMath (Original post)

Tue Oct 16, 2012, 05:37 PM

6. The simple answer is not until the election

We don't have party registration. Persons who vote in a primary election are considered to have affiliated themselves with that party but that only lasts until the next round of primaries two years later.

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