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Sun Jan 27, 2013, 10:39 PM

An article about taking photos in public - some of us have wondered about it over time

http://www.lightstalking.com/photographers-know-your-rights

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Reply An article about taking photos in public - some of us have wondered about it over time (Original post)
Mira Jan 2013 OP
RC Jan 2013 #1
JohnnyRingo Jan 2013 #2
alfredo Jan 2013 #3
ManiacJoe Jan 2013 #4
alfredo Jan 2013 #15
annabanana Jan 2013 #5
a la izquierda Jan 2013 #6
Celebration Jan 2013 #7
rdking647 Jan 2013 #8
Dalai_1 Jan 2013 #9
pepperbear Jan 2013 #10
Stevenmarc Jan 2013 #11
groundloop Jan 2013 #12
justiceischeap Jan 2013 #14
sir pball Feb 2013 #16
justiceischeap Feb 2013 #17
Stevenmarc Feb 2013 #18
klook Jan 2013 #13

Response to Mira (Original post)

Sun Jan 27, 2013, 11:25 PM

1. This seems to be needed

 

Thanks

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 12:38 AM

2. I have a friend who photographs locomotives.

Since that always happens on railroad property, he's had his share of nasty run ins. He likely has had all this explained to him in detail, but I'm going to send him the link anyway.

It doesn't have anything to do with the law or stalking, but when I want a candid photo of people gathered around a subject like a car at a car show, or if it's just friends standing around chatting, I pretend I'm taking a picture of something off to the side while I watch the scene for just the right time. Then I quickly turn the camera toward the subject and take the shot.

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Response to JohnnyRingo (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 12:44 AM

3. That is where a good wide angle lens comes in handy.

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Response to JohnnyRingo (Reply #2)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 02:43 AM

4. Shooting trains can get tricky.

Railroad property vs public property. If you are on their property, you do need to play by their rules.

One way around it is to shoot from public property when you can, like the city sidewalks at RR crossings. Of course that does limit you to running trains on their schedules.

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Response to ManiacJoe (Reply #4)

Tue Jan 29, 2013, 01:37 AM

15. A big-assed telephoto is another option, but trains are about

The craftsmanship. You want to get up close so you can see the rivets.

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 08:03 AM

5. Excellent link . . bookmark'd tweeted & faced. . . . n/t

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 08:15 AM

6. Thank you! nt

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 08:38 AM

7. Thanks!

A good reminder.........

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 10:18 AM

8. basic rule of thumb

in public there is no expectation of privacy. you can shoot anything you want and even sell photos that have a recognizable person w/o a model release as long as your selling it as editorial use (art is included in that). if its for commercial use (ie as a product endoresement etc) then you need a release.

if your on private property then the owner of the property can decide on their own rules

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 10:22 AM

9. Thank you! n/t

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 10:55 AM

10. interesting. I have one fear....

soon, the new normal will be devices that don't require visibility or hands to operate, cameras in eyeglasses and such. The technology is already here, we just need to turn it into a toy.

I imagine that Google glass will change the world, but I'm afraid of some of the consequences.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Glass

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 11:11 AM

11. Something for the camera bag

Thanks for posting this article.

I keep this PDF in the bag and on the phone just in case someone gets a tad persnickety in the streets.

http://www.krages.com/phoright.htm

I rarely get hassled by the police if I do get hassled its more likely it's a rent a cop or someone I just shot and even then that's a pretty rare occurrence.

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 12:39 PM

12. Even if it's "legal" to take someone's photo in public I try to ask first

Say for instance you see a couple of people sitting on a park bench, it would be considerate to ask first before you start taking their photo. If it were me sitting on that bench and someone walked up and just started clicking away I'd be pissed.

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Response to groundloop (Reply #12)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 03:04 PM

14. The people that are going to "steal" your photo probably wouldn't be noticed doing it

unless they're the street photographer's that specifically work that way. Bruce Gilden and Charlie Kirk are 2 that come to mind. They both use flash too, if I recall.

In street photography, it's often not encouraged to ask folks for permission, because then you miss the moment you want to document. Many street photographers live by the motto, it's better to apologize than ask for permission. When I see people I want to get up close and personal with on the street (mainly portraits), I ask but otherwise, I'm shooting from the hip and most people don't even notice.

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Response to justiceischeap (Reply #14)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 12:30 PM

16. Or use a long-ass lens

When I'm working the street I usually have my 18-270 pulled almost all the way out and manually focused ahead of time so I can get a shot off in a fraction of a second. If you're slick enough with a long enough lens 98% of the time people won't even notice you and 99% of the rest of the time they won't think you were shooting them; the public in general doesn't quite seem to understand that I don't need to be a foot away to fill my viewfinder with your faces.

This guy shows us all how it's done..

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Response to sir pball (Reply #16)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 01:56 PM

17. My god, that thing is huge! nt

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Response to sir pball (Reply #16)

Fri Feb 1, 2013, 03:27 PM

18. I like street photography

Last edited Fri Feb 1, 2013, 06:08 PM - Edit history (1)

Not a big fan of across the street photography. I find the use of a long lens tends to lack a certain connection with the subject, but that's me.

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Response to Mira (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 02:29 PM

13. Good info - thanks.

If I'm focusing on one person or a small group in a public location, I always make a point of at least engaging them in conversation instead of just snapping away. I usually ask their permission, as well. But it's good to get a better understanding of the legal boundaries, especially when law enforcement is involved.

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