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Wed Dec 5, 2012, 06:00 PM

 

Help finding software?

Dos anybody know of software that is used to stitch together separate exposures into a single composite photo. There must be such a thing available since NASA does it all the time, and I've seen other images made up of hundreds of separate exposures.

I'd like to experiment with some photo mosaics made up a dozen or so exposures, but I haven't been able to find software to do it, aside from doing it manually with layers in PS, that is.

Thanks for any info.

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Arrow 15 replies Author Time Post
Reply Help finding software? (Original post)
Speck Tater Dec 2012 OP
Fumesucker Dec 2012 #1
Speck Tater Dec 2012 #2
Fumesucker Dec 2012 #3
Speck Tater Dec 2012 #4
ManiacJoe Dec 2012 #5
Speck Tater Dec 2012 #6
ManiacJoe Dec 2012 #7
Major Nikon Dec 2012 #8
Stevenmarc Dec 2012 #9
Speck Tater Dec 2012 #10
Stevenmarc Dec 2012 #11
Speck Tater Dec 2012 #12
Stevenmarc Dec 2012 #13
Stevenmarc Dec 2012 #14
Speck Tater Dec 2012 #15

Response to Speck Tater (Original post)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 06:51 PM

1. Hugin is a panoramic stitcher if that's what you're talking about

http://hugin.sourceforge.net/

It's not as user friendly as some commercial products but it will get the job done if your images are good.

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Response to Fumesucker (Reply #1)

Wed Dec 5, 2012, 10:57 PM

2. Not for panaoramas, but it may work.

 

When you PAN the camera you get a PANorama. But when you DOLLY the camera, what would that be, a DOLYrama?

Check out this month's National Geographic foldout photo of a giant sequoia tree stitched together from a vertical dolly (not pan) of 126 exposures covering a dolly distance of 247 feet.

What I have in mind is taking a series of shots of building fronts downtown and stitching them together into a long strip that's not a panorama, but gives you a view of the street that you can't see in real life no matter where you stand. I guess it would either be a dollyrama or a strip-o-rama. hehe.

The slices need to be very narrow, vertically, or there will be perspective mismatches between adjoining exposures. The series of exposures will have to be carefully planned so that they will be joinable on scenery planes (building fronts) that are parallel to the film plane of the camera.

I'm not sure how to handle the sides of buildings that will be visible once the camera is moved beyond the edge of the front-facing wall. That's liable to make for some funky perspective effects. Essentially every alley between buildings, or cross street making a gap in the row of buildings will have its own vanishing point. I'll have to do some experimenting to figure out how that will all work.

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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #2)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 02:29 AM

3. You also might want to look into Autodesk's 123D catch

http://www.123dapp.com/catch

It's kind of the opposite of a panorama, you rotate around a central object and get a 3D model of it back.

I think I remember reading of it being used to do something like what you're talking about.

My 3D scanner also might do what you wish.

http://www.my3dscanner.com/

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Response to Fumesucker (Reply #3)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 12:58 PM

4. "my3Dscanner" is intersting, but

 

it's nothing at all like what I have in mind. I'm going to go out today and take some test shots and see if I can stitch them together with layers in Paintshop Pro. That experiment should give me a better idea what I need.

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Response to Speck Tater (Original post)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 03:36 PM

5. Are you referring to a collage type thing?

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Response to ManiacJoe (Reply #5)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 04:49 PM

6. No. What I'm talking about is like this:

 

Last edited Thu Dec 6, 2012, 05:25 PM - Edit history (1)

Imagine driving along a city street that's a mile long, and taking one picture every 5 feet along the road, and stitching them all together into a picture 8 inches high and 30 feet long showing every building along that mile-long stretch of road, as one long continuous, seamless picture instead of individual pictures of each building.

It's not a panorama because it wasn't made by panning around a fixed point. It's not a collection of individual building pictures because its stitched together into a seamless whole.

On edit: Here's a crude example of ten pictures I took and tried to stitch together manually:



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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #6)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 06:47 PM

7. In this case,

I would probably start with software that does panos as this is just a variation on a theme. However, I have no specific recommendations on that software.

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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #6)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 07:46 PM

8. I use photoshop

I played around with some free software that does the same thing a couple of years back with mixed results.

There are other kinda neat applications for this. You can increase your effective resolution to incredible levels by using a telephoto or a normal lens and taking multiple pictures of something like a landscape scene or buildings or whatever else doesn't move. Then after stitching you can print to huge sizes with incredible detail. It's kind of fun to play around with.

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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #6)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 07:48 PM

9. Ah, like Ed Ruscha's "Every Building on the Sunset Strip"

You should be able to use PS's stitching tools if you have enough overlap.

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Response to Stevenmarc (Reply #9)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 08:55 PM

10. Ed Ruscha? So I take it it's not a new idea with me. Hmmm. Oh well. nt

 

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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #10)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 08:59 PM

11. LOL, no, but it's a good idea.

And it has a nice technical challenge to it.

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Response to Stevenmarc (Reply #11)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 09:57 PM

12. So I looked him up and...

 

he made no attempt to stitch the photos seamlessly together.

"The images, taken during the day, capture only the facades of the buildings. Ignorance is given to cars or people, both of which are often cut in half between separate exposures. The imperfections of matching the facades are cracks along Ruscha’s drive. Through these cracks we find Ruscha, not such an anonymous author after all. Splitting cars in two, and mismatching facades we become keenly aware of the passage of time. The facades of buildings may appear as stage sets but they are active points on other itineraries, anticipating future and past narratives."

- Chris Balaschak


I want to create something far more ambitious; a seamless single composite photo-mosaic of a city street. I think I will have to start small and iron out the technical details on smaller pieces, working my way up to longer streets once I figure out how to handle the many challenges.

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Response to Speck Tater (Reply #12)

Thu Dec 6, 2012, 10:15 PM

13. You have an interesting project

And Ruscha's piece was done in the mid 60's a tad before photoshop making it virtually impossible to pull off a seamless image over a mile and a half, but I do love when an art historian tweaks an artists intent to fit the product.

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Response to Speck Tater (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 09:24 AM

14. Stephen Wilkes

A more contemporary artist whose project Day to Night, although different in concept to what you want to do, are large scale compositing works that are pretty amazing.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/culturepicturegalleries/8759721/New-York-Day-to-Night-photographs-by-Stephen-Wilkes.html

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Response to Stevenmarc (Reply #14)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 12:13 PM

15. Very interesting. Thanks for the link. nt

 

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