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Sat Dec 17, 2011, 12:30 AM

Recent Obituaries, Classic Films Only

TCM just showed their end of the year memorial, TCM Remembers, with short clips of the actors, actresses and other well-known film crew who have passed away in 2011. As always, it reminds me of all of the great talents who are no longer with us.

And that reminded me that we haven't started up a DU3 Classic Films Obituary thread. The DU2 version of this thread started on December 4, 2005, and its 345th post was added on December 9, 2011.

I'll christen this new thread with a death that we missed in the old thread. Bill McKinney was born on September 12, 1931, and died on December 1, 2011.

Switching between westerns, comedies and thrillers, McKinney was seldom called upon for more than a few minutes of screen time but had the seasoned character actor's knack of making a memorable first impression. In Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1974), the first of his seven films with Eastwood, he appears as a gibbering driver with a caged raccoon by his side and a boot full of white rabbits. He was subsequently cast as the bloodthirsty Terrill, who oversees the massacre of Eastwood's family in The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976); as an oily, sex-crazed constable coolly ridiculed by Locke in The Gauntlet (1977); as a biker in a horned helmet, almost outclowning Clyde the orangutan in Every Which Way But Loose (1978) and its sequel, Any Which Way You Can (1980); as a one-handed circus performer whose shotgun act has misfired, in Bronco Billy (1980); and as a seen-it-all-before barman in Pink Cadillac (1989).

These thumbnail sketches were usually variations on a theme: southern good ole boys gone bad, men with moonshine on their breath and malevolence in mind. McKinney was mostly used as a comic foil for the perennial straight man Eastwood. But as zany as some of his performances were, there was often an undercurrent of genuine menace, especially for viewers who had seen him in John Boorman's Deliverance (1972).

Besides its duelling banjos soundtrack, Deliverance remains most famous for a queasily protracted scene in which McKinney (credited as Mountain Man) and Herbert "Cowboy" Coward (Toothless Man) set upon a couple of city slickers (played by Ned Beatty and Jon Voight) who have taken a wrong turn on a canoeing trip in the deep south. The wild-eyed, rotten-toothed Mountain Man brandishes a knife, taunts Beatty's character, forces him to undress and then rapes him, demanding that he "squeal like a pig" – perhaps one of the best-known lines in 70s cinema.


http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/dec/08/bill-mckinney


(TCM Remembers 2011 is a set of silent clips, backed by a soothing vocal. The only words spoken come from Peter Falk, as the Grandfather, who says "As you wish...". It's lovely!)

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Reply Recent Obituaries, Classic Films Only (Original post)
Staph Dec 2011 OP
CBHagman Dec 2011 #1
Paladin Dec 2011 #2
CBHagman Jan 2012 #3
CBHagman Feb 2012 #4
CBHagman May 2012 #5
Matilda May 2012 #6
CBHagman Jun 2012 #7
CBHagman Jun 2012 #8
Graybeard Jun 2012 #9
CBHagman Jul 2012 #10
lavenderdiva Jul 2012 #11
CBHagman Jul 2012 #12
CBHagman Jul 2012 #13
lavenderdiva Jul 2012 #14
CBHagman Aug 2012 #15
Graybeard Aug 2012 #16
Electrominuette Aug 2012 #17
CBHagman Sep 2012 #18
muriel_volestrangler Sep 2012 #19
Graybeard Sep 2012 #20
muriel_volestrangler Sep 2012 #21
longship Jan 2013 #30
CBHagman Oct 2012 #22
CBHagman Oct 2012 #23
CBHagman Nov 2012 #24
CBHagman Dec 2012 #25
CBHagman Dec 2012 #26
CBHagman Dec 2012 #27
CBHagman Dec 2012 #28
graham4anything Jan 2013 #32
Graybeard Jan 2013 #29
CBHagman Jan 2013 #31
graham4anything Jan 2013 #33
graham4anything Jan 2013 #34
Graybeard Jan 2013 #35
CBHagman Feb 2013 #36
graham4anything Mar 2013 #37
CBHagman Mar 2013 #38
CBHagman Mar 2013 #39
CBHagman Mar 2013 #40
graham4anything May 2013 #41
CBHagman May 2013 #42
CBHagman May 2013 #43
CBHagman Jun 2013 #44
Graybeard Jul 2013 #45
Staph Aug 2013 #46
CBHagman Aug 2013 #47
Auggie Aug 2013 #48
CBHagman Aug 2013 #49
CBHagman Aug 2013 #50
Graybeard Oct 2013 #51
Graybeard Oct 2013 #52
Graybeard Oct 2013 #53
CBHagman Oct 2013 #54
theHandpuppet Oct 2013 #55
CBHagman Oct 2013 #56
CBHagman Oct 2013 #57
CBHagman Dec 2013 #58
Staph Dec 2013 #59
CBHagman Dec 2013 #60
CBHagman Dec 2013 #61
lavenderdiva Dec 2013 #62
CBHagman Dec 2013 #63
lavenderdiva Dec 2013 #64
CBHagman Dec 2013 #65
Matilda Dec 2013 #66
Matilda Dec 2013 #67
CBHagman Dec 2013 #68
Matilda Dec 2013 #69
CBHagman Jan 2014 #70
CBHagman Jan 2014 #71
CBHagman Jan 2014 #72
CBHagman Feb 2014 #73
Auggie Feb 2014 #74
Staph Apr 2014 #75
pengillian101 Apr 2014 #76
CBHagman May 26 #77
Auggie May 27 #78
CBHagman May 27 #79
Auggie May 28 #80
CBHagman Jun 20 #81
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CBHagman Jul 9 #86

Response to Staph (Original post)

Sat Dec 17, 2011, 08:48 AM

1. The "TCM Remembers" films are gems.

A few of those are still available on YouTube, or at least were when I last checked for them. They are masterfully edited, and the musical accompaniment, often quite an unexpected song choice, always works beautifully.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Dec 18, 2011, 08:25 PM

2. We Lost Lots Of Good Folks This Year.


I try to keep up with such things, but I had no idea that Charles Napier and Jill Haworth had passed away. Nice presentation by TCM, as usual.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Jan 17, 2012, 03:11 PM

3. Frederica Sagor Maas, screenwriter of the silent era, dies at age 111.

There's living well, and then there's outliving just about everybody!

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/15/arts/frederica-sagor-maas-scriptwriter-from-the-silent-era-dies-at-111.html?_r=1&adxnnl=1&ref=obituaries&adxnnlx=1326830896-ajxNFcS+UL0k4eluWp0H2g

Before dying on Jan. 5 in La Mesa, Calif., at 111, Mrs. Maas was one of the last living links to cinema’s silent era. She wrote dozens of stories, adaptations and scripts, sat with Greta Garbo at the famed long table in MGM’s commissary, and adapted to sound in the movies, and then to color.

Perhaps most satisfying, Mrs. Maas outlived pretty much anybody who might have disagreed with her version of things. “I can get my payback now,” she said in an interview with Salon in 1999. “I’m alive and thriving and, well, you S.O.B.’s are all below.”

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Feb 28, 2012, 09:49 PM

4. Swedish actor Erland Josephson, 88.



From the Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/feb/26/erland-josephson

Although the actors who comprised Ingmar Bergman's repertory company all went on to make their own prestigious careers, they will for ever be associated with the great Swedish film and stage director. Erland Josephson, who has died aged 88 after suffering from Parkinson's disease, was artistically linked with Bergman even more than Max Von Sydow, Liv Ullmann and Ingrid Thulin. Josephson appeared in more than a dozen of Bergman's films, and played a Bergman surrogate in Ullmann's Faithless (2000).

In middle and old age, he was chosen by directors such as Andrei Tarkovsky and Theo Angelopoulos for the qualities he revealed in the Bergman films – a certain self-centred introspection and a deep melancholy, etched on his lined and grizzled features. Because he became a leading film actor in his 50s, he seems never to have been young.

His work with Bergman dated back to the 1940s, when they were at the Municipal theatre, Helsingborg. They then worked together at Gothenburg Municipal theatre and the Royal Dramatic theatre, Stockholm, where he took over from Bergman as artistic director in 1966.


His credits, as per IMDB:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0430746/


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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri May 11, 2012, 11:20 PM

5. Joyce Redman, actress.



The stage, television, and film actress was 93. She'd played opposite some of the greatest talents of theater and cinema, but is perhaps best known to the public at large for her memorable turn in Tom Jones. See clip above.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/may/11/joyce-redman?newsfeed=true

Redman was born and bred in Newcastle, County Mayo, one of four sisters in an Anglo-Irish family. She was educated privately by a governess and trained for the stage at Rada in London, making her debut in 1935 as First Tiger Lily in Alice Through the Looking Glass at the Playhouse. She was established as a regular on the West End stage, and in the club theatres, by wartime. She was George Bernard Shaw's Essie, "a wild, timid-looking creature with black hair and tanned skin", in The Devil's Disciple, at the Piccadilly in 1940, followed in 1942 with Maria in Twelfth Night at the Arts theatre and Wendy in Peter Pan at the Winter Garden.

Those Old Vic and New theatre seasons were the defining period: an acclaimed Solveig in the Ralph Richardson production of Ibsen's Peer Gynt; Louka in Shaw's Arms and the Man; Lady Anne in the legendary Richard III of Olivier; Cordelia to the same actor's King Lear; Sonya in Uncle Vanya; and Doll Tearsheet in Henry IV Part 2 (though James Agate, for some reason, thought her too small to play rampageous bawds).

Redman toured to the Comédie-Française in Paris, conquered Broadway, played the title role in Jean Anouilh's Colombe, directed by Peter Brook in 1951, then went to Stratford-upon-Avon in 1955 to play Helena in All's Well That Ends Well and Mistress Ford in The Merry Wives of Windsor. She could play light comedy and stern tragedy, as she demonstrated to many devoted gallery-ites during Olivier's exciting inaugural National theatre seasons at the Old Vic in the early 1960s.


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Response to CBHagman (Reply #5)

Sat May 12, 2012, 04:03 AM

6. I remember her as Emilia in Olivier's film of "Othello".

I was working as an usherette during the screening of Othello, and after some weeks of viewing, I decided that each night I'd focus my attention on just one actor, studying their performance in detail, even when they were in the background and saying nothing. Redman was one I watched carefully, and I developed a respect for her as a result. She did a lot with a supporting role.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2012, 04:04 PM

7. Actress Ann Rutherford.



She was featured in the Andy Hardy series and in Gone with the Wind, but to me, she'll always be the flighty, wayward Lydia Bennet of the 1940 adaptation of Pride and Prejudice.

http://www.latimes.com/news/obituaries/la-me-ann-rutherford-20120612,0,7959825.story

While roller skating home from Virgil Junior High, Ann would detour to Wilshire Boulevard radio stations, where she wandered into viewing rooms to watch actors work.

"One day my English teacher criticized me," Rutherford told The Times in 1969, "and I was furious. I thought, I wouldn't have to listen to Miss So-and-So if I were an actress."

She invented an acting history and presented it to KFAC, and a month later she was voicing Nancy in the radio series "Nancy and Dick: The Spirit of 76," Rutherford recalled in 2010.

When an actress she resembled dropped out of the 1935 film "Waterfront Lady," Rutherford was cast in the first of nearly 60 movies she would make by 1950.



IMDB credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0751946/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sat Jun 23, 2012, 09:27 AM

8. Film critic Andrew Sarris, 83, proponent of auteur theory.

For many years he was at the Village Voice.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/movies/andrew-sarris-movie-critic-village-voice-helped-popularize-directors-dead-83-article-1.1099384

“Andrew Sarris was a vital figure in teaching America to respond to foreign films as well as American movies,” fellow critic David Thomson said Wednesday. “As writer, teacher, friend and husband he was an essential. History has gone.”

Sarris started with the Voice in 1960 and established himself as a major reviewer in 1962 with the essay “Notes on the Auteur Theory.” Acknowledging the influence of French critics and even previous American writers, Sarris argued for the primacy of directors and called the “ultimate glory” of movies “the tension between a director’s personality and his material.”

He not only helped write the rules, but filled in the names. He was a pioneer of the annual “Top 10” film lists that remain fixtures in the media. In 1968, he published “The American Cinema: Directors and Directions 1929-1968,” what Sarris described as “a collection of facts, a reminder of movies to be resurrected, of genres to be redeemed, of directors to be rediscovered.” Among his favorites: Ford, Hawks, Orson Welles and Fritz Lang. Categorized as “Less Than Meets the Eye”: John Huston, David Lean, Elia Kazan and Fred Zinnemann.


How come it took his obituary for me to find out he was married to Molly Haskell (From Reverence to Rape: The Treatment of Women in the Movies)?

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sat Jun 23, 2012, 08:27 PM

9. Frank Cady

Most will remember him from TV. He was a regular as Sam Drucker on three shows:The Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction and Green Acres. Before that he was Doc Williams on The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.

He did a lot of movies usually as a lean and lanky townsperson or storekeeper. My favorite Frank Cady role was in When Worlds Collide (1951). He played the manservant to a tyrannical John Hoyt, pushing his wheelchair while being abused... until he decides to assert himself and take matters in his own hands. Good actor.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Jul 3, 2012, 07:22 PM

10. Actor Andy Griffith, 86.

Somehow it seems too soon.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/andy-griffith-beloved-the-andy-griffith-show-star-who-also-excelled-on-film-dies-at-86/2012/07/03/gJQACBAsKW_story.html?hpid=z2

I think I was in my late teens when I first rode through Mount Airy, North Carolina, Griffith's hometown, and realized Mayberry was based on a real place.

If you haven't seen Griffith in Waitress, be sure to check it out. He added just the right touch to Adrienne Shelley's fable about a woman with a "train wreck" of a life...and a few secrets.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2012, 07:39 PM

11. Ernest Borgnine -- passed away at 95

http://www.chron.com/news/article/Oscar-winning-star-Ernest-Borgnine-dies-at-95-3691720.php

Ernest Borgnine, the beefy screen star known for blustery, often villainous roles, but who won the best-actor Oscar for playing against type as a lovesick butcher in "Marty" in 1955, died Sunday. He was 95.

His longtime spokesman, Harry Flynn, told The Associated Press that Borgnine died of renal failure at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center with his wife and children at his side.

Borgnine, who endeared himself to a generation of Baby Boomers with the 1960s TV comedy "McHale's Navy," first attracted notice in the early 1950s in villain roles, notably as the vicious Fatso Judson, who beat Frank Sinatra to death in "From Here to Eternity."

Then came "Marty," a low-budget film based on a Paddy Chayefsky television play that starred Rod Steiger. Borgnine played a 34-year-old who fears he is so unattractive he will never find romance. Then, at a dance, he meets a girl with the same fear.


'Marty' was always my favorite Ernest Borgnine role. He plays such a sweet, tender-hearted man.

Interesting blog post about background on 'Marty'. I never knew that Betsy Blair was married to Gene Kelly, and blacklisted. She eventually moved to Europe, after her role in Marty.

http://picturespoilers.wordpress.com/category/ernest-borgnine/

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Response to lavenderdiva (Reply #11)

Sun Jul 8, 2012, 09:18 PM

12. "Marty" is a favorite of mine.

It really is a gem of a movie, optimistic but also blunt about the tensions and frustrations of courtship and marriage and family life...and of hanging out with the guys, of course!





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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sat Jul 14, 2012, 11:39 AM

13. Actress Isuzu Yamada, 95.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/movies/isuzu-yamada-95-acclaimed-japanese-actress/2012/07/12/gJQAjTc5fW_story.html

Isuzu Yamada, who became one of Japan’s most formidable and revered actresses and is perhaps best remembered as the treacherous wife of a warlord in “Throne of Blood,” director Akira Kurosawa’s adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy “Macbeth,” died July 9 at a hospital in Tokyo. She was 95.

(SNIP)

A second-generation actor, Ms. Yamada appeared in more than 120 film and television roles in addition to her extensive theater career. She rose to movie stardom in the mid-1930s playing a series of “fallen women” — sometimes tragically sympathetic, sometimes tragically opportunistic —under the director Kenji Mizoguchi, whose films explored societal hypocrisies toward women.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Jul 15, 2012, 12:52 PM

14. Celeste Holm, dies age 95

What a wonderful creative life, filled with amazing performances. I guess there are others still living, but it seems to me, she may be one of the last of the great era of film, IMHO.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/07/15/showbiz/celeste-holm-obit/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Aug 28, 2012, 08:22 AM

15. Actress Phyllis Thaxter, 92.



Many of her obituaries mention her comeback role in Superman, but frankly the first thing I thought of was her part in Three Sovereigns for Sarah, a harrowing and very personal TV dramatization of the Salem witch trials and their aftermath.

I'd forgotten she was John Garfield's costar in The Breaking Point, which I caught on TCM a few years ago. It's well worth seeing, and is, believe it or not, based on the same work as To Have and Have Not...and you might not know it to look at it.

From the Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/aug/17/phyllis-thaxter

Thaxter's theatre work led to her being offered the role of the pregnant wife of the second world war pilot played by Van Johnson in Mervyn LeRoy's excellent war drama Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944). Although she had only a few scenes, Thaxter made enough impression to gain an MGM contract. According to the New York Times critic: "Phyllis Thaxter is surpassingly affecting as the wife of Captain Lawson. Her comparative newness as an actress and a wistful voice give her a rare advantage."

The role, more or less, set the pattern for her film career. However, she had a rare chance to play against her nice-girl persona in Bewitched (1945). Described on the posters as "Darling of society, Cruel love killer, She lived two amazing lives", Thaxter played a schizophrenic – both a femme fatale and a good girl, female archetypes of film noir. She is a sweet young thing, who literally hears an evil voice within her, urging her on to murder. But it was back to pure pure sweetness and light in the all-star Week-End at the Waldorf (1945), in which she wrongly believes her fiance to be in love with a film star (played by Ginger Rogers), until persuaded otherwise. In Living in a Big Way (1947), she is a pretty war widow with three children who offers comfort to unhappily married Gene Kelly, and in Tenth Avenue Angel (1948), she is the doting mother of Margaret O'Brien, the little girl who infects everyone, except the audience, with her faith and joy.

Thaxter's last movie for MGM was Fred Zinnemann's Act of Violence (1948), in which she tries to be the voice of reason to stop an embittered ex-PoW played by Robert Ryan from wreaking revenge on his commanding officer (Van Heflin), who betrayed him to the Nazis.

Before taking up a contract with Warner Bros, Thaxter appeared in Robert Wise's noir western Blood on the Moon (1948) for RKO, where she is a wealthy cattle baron's daughter, sorely used by baddie Robert Preston, who promises her marriage. Her first role for Warners, in The Breaking Point (1950), a remake of To Have and Have Not, based on the Ernest Hemingway short story, was one of her best. Made to look dowdy, she is remarkably effective as the practical wife of a charter boat captain, played by John Garfield. Trying in vain to convince him to sell his boat and make a steady living, she tells him, "Pop says you can have a job anytime on his lettuce ranch in Salinas." Worried that he might be attracted to the blonde Patricia Neal, Thaxter desperately lightens her hair.


Her IMDB credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0857187/

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Response to CBHagman (Reply #15)

Tue Aug 28, 2012, 10:08 AM

16. My favorite Phyllis Thaxter role.

Always providing a genuine warmth to the roles she played I remember Phyllis Thaxter as Burt Lancaster's wife in the bio-pic "Jim Thorpe- All American".

RIP to a fine actress.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Aug 29, 2012, 01:16 PM

17. Bill McKinney

May he rest in peace.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Sep 25, 2012, 03:08 PM

18. Claudine Mawby Walker, 90, child star of early talkies.

Frankly, I'd never heard of the Mawby Triplets before I stumbled on this article! Theirs is a rather poignant story too.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/23/movies/claudine-mawby-last-of-early-film-triplets-dies-at-90.html?ref=obituaries

Hollywood publicity agents called them the Mawby Triplets. They were a set of adorably blond little English girls who appeared in some of the earliest talking films, cherubs adorning the celluloid canvases of the 1920s and ’30s. Cast in movies with stars like Douglas Fairbanks Jr., Gloria Swanson and John Barrymore, they were, for a time, among the most famous children in the world

Their parents shielded them from knowing how famous they were, isolating them from their fans and other children. Their agents shielded the fans from knowing the truth about the girls — that they were not really triplets. They were actually composed of twins, Claudine and Claudette, and their sister, Angella, who was 11 months older.

“Mummy and Daddy were at first rather taken aback,” Claudine Mawby Walker recalled in an interview with The Daily Mail in 1995. “They kept saying that, contrary to appearances, we weren’t actually triplets. But the film people just said we looked like triplets, and that was what counted.”

If anyone asked, she added, “Daddy would just joke that only two of us were triplets.”


Read more, including the eventual fates of the Mawby sisters, at the link.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Sep 27, 2012, 08:10 AM

19. Herbert Lom, Pink Panther star, dies aged 95

Actor Herbert Lom, best known for playing Charles Dreyfus in the Pink Panther films, has died aged 95.

The Czech-born, London-based actor starred opposite Peter Sellers in several films as Inspector Clouseau's irritable boss.

Lom appeared in more than 100 films during his 60-year acting career, including such classics as The Ladykillers, Spartacus and El Cid.
...
Lom also portrayed Napoleon Bonaparte on two occasions. One of them came in the 1956 screen adaptation of Tolstoy's War And Peace, also starring Audrey Hepburn and Henry Fonda.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-19745910

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #19)

Thu Sep 27, 2012, 12:56 PM

20. Wonderful actor, long career.

My favorite Herbert Lom film is The Ladykillers (1955) with Alec Guinness and Peter Sellers. He plays a "tough guy" gangster who is really a softie who can't bring himself to harm the old lady.

RIP

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Response to Graybeard (Reply #20)

Thu Sep 27, 2012, 01:37 PM

21. Yes, a great film

I was wondering about looking for a clip to post, but it's the kind of film where you really need to watch a lot of it to appreciate well.

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #19)

Mon Jan 7, 2013, 01:52 AM

30. Or, as Yazkov in "Hopscotch"

Great comedic romp, available from Criterion, with Walter Matthau, Glenda Jackson, Sam Waterston, and the always good value, Ned Beatty.

Here Lom plays the Soviet uber-spy.

It's a comedic romp which features all actors as foils to Matthau's and Jackson's escapades.

It is a minor, but very endearing role, for Lom.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Oct 10, 2012, 03:24 PM

22. Football great/actor Alex Karras, 77.



Karras (far right) with Victor/Victoria stars Robert Preston, Julie Andrews, and James Garner

Detroit Lions lineman Alex Karras has died. I include him in Classic Films because of his memorable role in Victor/Victoria, a very entertaining film memorable not only for its music and fun but for its (for the time) groundbreaking depiction of gay characters.

From what I've read, Alex Karras and his wife, Susan Clark, could be relied on to support Democrats and progressive causes in general.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/11/sports/football/alex-karras-nfl-lineman-and-actor-dies-at-77.html

Alexander George Karras was born on July 15, 1935, in Gary, Ind., where his father, George, a Greek immigrant, was a doctor, and his mother, the former Emmeline Wilson, was a nurse. An all-state football player in high school, he attended the University of Iowa, where in 1957 he won the Outland Trophy as the outstanding interior lineman in college football. In 1958, he was drafted in the first round by the Lions.

Karras’s other film credits included roles in the raunchy comedy “Porky’s,” the suspense thriller “Against All Odds” and the gender confusion comedy “Victor/Victoria.” He spent three seasons in the broadcast booth, working with Howard Cosell and Frank Gifford on ABC’s “Monday Night Football,” and later wrote a novel, “Tuesday Night Football,” sending up his experience. He also wrote an autobiography, “Even Big Guys Cry.”

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Oct 11, 2012, 07:38 PM

23. Actor Turhan Bey, 90.



I'll admit I was totally unfamiliar with the man. In Hollywood's golden era, he appeared alongside many notables. In recent years he was featured in Babylon 5!

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/turkish-hollywood-actor-dies-in-austria.aspx?pageID=238&nID=32134&NewsCatID=381

Turhan Bey, an actor whose exotic good looks earned him the nickname of “Turkish Delight” in films with Errol Flynn and Katherine Hepburn before he left Hollywood for a quieter life in Vienna, has died. He was 90.


(SNIP)

Born in Austria as Gilbert Selahettin Schultavey, the son of a Turkish diplomat, Bey assumed his stage name shortly after moving to the United States with his Jewish Czech mother from Vienna to escape the Nazis and being discovered by talent scouts from Warner Bros. studios.

His popular name was “Turkish Delight” - a reference to his suave good looks that made him an ideal partner to exotics like Maria Montez in escapist Technicolor adventure fantasies set in faraway places.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Nov 23, 2012, 09:07 AM

24. Film composer Richard Robbins ("A Room with a View," "Maurice") dies at age 71.

Though perhaps not as frequently mentioned as director James Ivory, producer Ismail Merchant, or screenwriter Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Richard Robbins was a key part of the team behind the Merchant-Ivory films.

Mr. Robbins is survived by his longtime partner, the artist Michael Schell.

From the L.A. Times:

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/nov/18/local/la-me-richard-robbins-20121118

Robbins created the score for nearly every Merchant Ivory film from "The Europeans" in 1979 to "The White Countess" in 2005. He earned back-to-back Academy Award nominations for his original music for "Howards End" (1992) and "The Remains of the Day" (1993).

(SNIP)

Of the melancholy, evocative score for "The Remains of the Day," Robbins said in a 2000 interview with writer Chris Terrio that his inspiration had come from a single scene featuring actress Emma Thompson.

"I know when ... the hard part of writing the score is over, because I know how I feel about a character," he said in the interview posted on the Merchant Ivory website. "That's a great relief. That can happen all at once: It can be as simple as watching one of the characters enter a room or walk down a hallway. In 'The Remains of the Day,' it happened when I first saw the shot of Emma Thompson walking down the hall toward the camera. That did it."


From the Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2012/nov/13/richard-robbins

Although mostly influenced by the minimalist compositions of Philip Glass, Robbins was capable of producing the sumptuous, colourfully orchestrated, symphonic music, just the right side of sentimentality, for Maurice (1987), which won the best score at the Venice film festival. It remained Robbins's own favourite among his scores.

Robbins music ranged from a jazzy foxtrot for Quartet (1981), and Indian themes in Heat and Dust (1983), to the jauntily percussive soundtrack for Mr and Mrs Bridge (1990), modern-sounding classicism for Jefferson in Paris (1995) and Richard Straussian tones for The Golden Bowl (2000).

As music director, he also had to select music that the characters would have listened to, contributing to the mood of the film. "The pieces give us additional information about the characters," Robbins explained. "The works of Beethoven and Schubert were once part of people's daily musical landscape, as surprising as that may seem today."

Naturally, Beethoven's 5th Symphony, given EM Forster's famous description of it in the novel, featured in Howards End (1992), as did the Franz Schubert song Sei mir gegrüst, o Mai in The Remains of the Day (1993), though both films gained Oscar nominations for Robbins for best original score. He also permitted Puccini's aria, O mio babbino caro, to dominate the rapturous scenes in A Room With a View (1985), and pop songs by musicians including Ziggy Marley, Inner City and Iggy Pop for Slaves of New York (1989).


His credits, as per IMDB:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0006442/

Do read the obits, even if you usually skip over them; these are particularly informative and enjoyable.



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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Dec 20, 2012, 02:59 PM

25. Dancer Jeni LeGon, 96.

I have to admit I don't remember encountering her name before this, but she sounds like a real dynamo!

http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/local/obituaries/obituary-jeni-legon-pioneering-tap-dance-soloist-666899/


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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 09:19 PM

26. Actor Jack Klugman, 90.

Jack Klugman: Tony Randall's costar in TV's The Odd Couple, star of Quincy (the forerunner of today's forensics series), and a tough yet likeable juror in 12 Angry Men.

Check out the write-up in The New York Times; it's quite an interesting read.



With E.G. Marshall (left) in 12 Angry Men

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/25/arts/television/jack-klugman-stage-and-screen-actor-is-dead-at-90.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Mr. Klugman’s path to success was serendipitous. He was born in Philadelphia on April 27, 1922, the youngest of six children of immigrants from Russia. Most sources indicate that his name at birth was Jacob, though Mr. Klugman said in an interview that the name on his birth certificate is Jack.

His father, Max, was a house painter who died when Jack was 12. His mother, Rose, was a milliner who worked out of the family home in hardscrabble South Philadelphia, where Jack grew up shooting pool, rolling dice and playing the horses. His interest in acting was kindled at 14 or 15 when his sister took him to a play, “One Third of a Nation,” a “living newspaper” production of the Federal Theater Project about life in an American slum; the play made the case for government housing projects.

“I just couldn’t believe the power of it,” he said of the production in an interview in 1998 for the Archive of American Television, crediting the experience for instilling in him his social-crusading impulse. “I wanted to be a muckraker.”

After a stint in the Army — he was discharged because of a kidney ailment — Mr. Klugman returned to Philadelphia but racked up a debt to loan sharks who were so dangerous that he left town. He landed in Pittsburgh, where he auditioned for the drama department at Carnegie Tech (now Carnegie Mellon University).

“They said: ‘You’re not suited to be an actor. You’re more suited to be a truck driver,’ ” he recalled. But this was 1945, the war was just ending and there was a dearth of male students, so he was accepted. “There were no men,” he said. “Otherwise they wouldn’t have taken me in.”



His credits, as per IMDB:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001430/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 09:28 PM

27. Actor and D-Day veteran Charles Durning, 89.

Stage, screen, and television actor Charles Durning died on Christmas Eve. His stage, TV, and film credits alone are astonishing, but that wasn't the most remarkable thing about the man.



http://www.salon.com/2012/12/26/character_actor_charles_durning_dies_at_89/

He was among the first wave of U.S. soldiers to land at Normandy during the D-Day invasion and the only member of his Army unit to survive. He killed several Germans and was wounded in the leg. Later he was bayoneted by a young German soldier whom he killed with a rock. He was captured in the Battle of the Bulge and survived a massacre of prisoners.

In later years, he refused to discuss the military service for which he was awarded the Silver Star and three Purple Hearts.

“Too many bad memories,” he told an interviewer in 1997. “I don’t want you to see me crying.”

Tragedy also stalked other members of his family. Durning was 12 when his father died, and five of his sisters lost their lives to smallpox and scarlet fever.

A high school counselor told him he had no talent for art, languages or math and should learn office skills. But after seeing “King Kong” and some of James Cagney’s films, Durning knew what he wanted to do.

Leaving home at 16, he worked in a munitions factory, on a slag heap and in a barbed-wire factory.



TV and film credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001164/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Dec 26, 2012, 09:30 PM

28. TCM Remembers 2012

It's now incomplete, given the loss of two great character actors just in the last week, but here is TCM Remembers 2012.

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Response to CBHagman (Reply #28)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 05:27 AM

32. these are the best made compiliations ...thanks for reminding me to favor this in my youtubes

 

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Jan 6, 2013, 11:08 AM

29. Harry Carey, Jr.

The son of veteran character actor Harry Carey he joined the John Ford/John Wayne stock company (after his service in the Navy during WWII) in the film "Red River" (1948). This was followed by fine performances in "3 Godfathers" (1948) and "She Wore A Yellow Ribbon" (1949).

He worked steadily in Hollywood; he played the young West Point cadet Dwight Eisenhower in Ford's "The Long Gray Line" (1955), and became himself a veteran character actor in films and TV.

Carey died at age 91. RIP

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Mon Jan 14, 2013, 12:37 AM

31. Actress Mariangela Melato, 71.



http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/12/arts/mariangela-melato-italian-actress-dies-at-71.html?_r=0

Mariangela Melato, an Italian actress who achieved fame alongside Giancarlo Giannini portraying complicated relationships in the provocative films of Lina Wertmüller, including “The Seduction of Mimi” and “Swept Away (by an Unusual Destiny in the Blue Sea of August),” died on Friday in Rome. She was 71.

(SNIP)

Ms. Melato was already a successful actress when she first appeared in a film written and directed by Ms. Wertmüller, the Italian filmmaker whose work has challenged Italian social and political mores and depicted often vicious sexual relationships. Blond and throaty-voiced, with striking green eyes, Ms. Melato played the love interest to Mr. Giannini’s bewildered chauvinist in three of Ms. Wertmüller’s films from the 1970s.

In “The Seduction of Mimi” (1972), Ms. Melato played Fiorella, a jilted Sicilian wife who takes revenge on her adulterous husband, Mr. Giannini’s Mimi, by cuckolding him. In “Love and Anarchy” (1973), Ms. Wertmüller’s anti-Fascist drama, Ms. Melato plays Salomè, a prostitute and anarchist who helps a callow farmer, Mr. Giannini’s Tunin, in his plot to assassinate Mussolini.

Probably Ms. Melato’s best-known role in a Wertmüller film was as Raffaella in “Swept Away,” a sometimes harrowing romantic comedy of class conflict released in Italy in 1974. Raffaella, a haughty member of the Milanese upper class, is outspoken in her contempt for Gennarino (Mr. Giannini), a Communist Sicilian deckhand aboard a yacht she has rented.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 05:42 AM

33. Larry Hagman, son of Mary Martin Nov. 23, 2012

 

Though primarily known for tv roles as JR Ewing on Dallas and Major Tony Nelson on I dream of Jeannie, Larry Hagman was brilliant in the films he was in (especially Fail-Safe starring Henry Fonda) and the Eagle Has landed).



wiki-
He appeared in such feature films as The Group, Fail-Safe, Harry and Tonto, Mother, Jugs & Speed, The Eagle Has Landed, Superman, S.O.B., Nixon and Primary Colors. His television work included Getting Away from It All, Sidekicks, The Return of the World's Greatest Detective, Intimate Strangers and Checkered Flag or Crash.

He also directed (and appeared briefly in) a low-budget comedy and horror film in 1972 called Beware! The Blob, also called Son of Blob, a sequel to the classic 1958 horror film The Blob. This was the only feature film he directed

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Jan 15, 2013, 05:45 AM

34. Cliff Osmond Dec.22 at 75

 

http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118063991/

Actor and noted Hollywood acting coach Cliff Osmond, whose long career included roles in the Billy Wilder films "Irma La Douce," "Kiss Me Stupid," "The Front Page" and "The Fortune Cookie," died Dec. 22 in Pacific Palisades, Calif., after fighting pancreatic battle for four years. He was 75.
Osmond made his first appearances on television in 1962, guesting on shows including "Twilight Zone," "The Rifleman," "Dr. Kildare" and "The Untouchables" in that year alone. Other TV credits during the period included "Have Gun Will Travel," "Wagon Train," "77 Sunset Strip," "Batman" and "The Flying Nun."

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Jan 31, 2013, 05:21 AM

35. Patty Andrews, 94

The youngest and the last surviving of The Andrews Sisters, a hugely popular singing trio in the 40s and 50s. Along with her sisters LaVerne and Maxene the group sold more than 75 million records.

Appearing in such films as Buck Privates (1941) with Abbott and Costello, and many more, their songs raised the morale of U.S. troops all over the world. During WWII they were tireless in their travels to entertain servicemen on bases in Europe and the Pacific and tours across the U.S. to sell war bonds.

Patty Andrews wa 94. RIP

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Mon Feb 18, 2013, 11:22 PM

36. Stage, television, and film actor Richard Briers, 79.



Sitcoms, suspense, Shakespeare -- he did it all, and very well.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/tv-and-radio/2013/feb/18/richard-briers

When he played Hamlet as a young man, Richard Briers, who has died aged 79 after suffering from a lung condition, said he was the first Prince of Denmark to give the audience half an hour in the pub afterwards. He was nothing if not quick. In fact, wrote the veteran critic WA Darlington, he played Hamlet "like a demented typewriter". Briers, always the most modest and self-deprecating of actors, and the sweetest of men, relished the review, happy to claim a place in the light comedians' gallery of his knighted idols Charles Hawtrey, Gerald du Maurier and Noël Coward.

"People don't realise how good an actor Dickie Briers really is," said John Gielgud. This was probably because of his sunny, cheerful disposition and the rat-a-tat articulacy of his delivery. "You're a great farceur," said Coward, delivering another testimony, "because you never, ever, hang about."

Although he excelled in the plays of Alan Ayckbourn, and became a national figure in his television sitcoms of the 1970s and 80s, notably The Good Life, he could mine hidden depths on stage, giving notable performances in Ibsen, Chekhov and, for Kenneth Branagh's Renaissance company, Shakespeare.



IMDB credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001972/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Mar 19, 2013, 09:01 PM

37. Malachi Throne FalseFace on tv's Batman & legendary character actor dies

 

wiki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malachi_Throne
Malachi Throne (December 1, 1928 – March 13, 2013) was an American stage and television actor, noted for his guest-starring roles on Star Trek: The Original Series, Star Trek: The Next Generation, Lost in Space, Land of the Giants, The Time Tunnel, Mission: Impossible, and The Six Million Dollar Man, and his recurring role on It Takes a Thief


Roles in Batman
One of his strangest roles was as the villain "False Face" in the ABC Batman (1966) series. The character, who used a variety of disguises to effect his nefarious schemes, wore a semitransparent mask when not in the middle of his crimes. The mask rendered Throne's real face unrecognizable on screen. Playing off this effect, but against Throne's wishes, the show's producers wrote the on-screen credit as "? as False Face", which denied Throne his credit. However, at the end credits of the episode, "Holy Rat Race," his full name was finally given full credit.

Later, Throne appeared in animation as the voice of Two-Face's superego "Judge" on The New Batman Adventures (1998), and as the voice of Fingers the Gorilla on the Batman Beyond episode "Speak No Evil" (2000).

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 03:20 PM

38. Special effects innovator Petro Vlahos, 96.

I kept a copy of this gentleman's obituary handy but each day have forgotten to post the link here. if you hang out with us here, and even if you have merely wandered into a movie house or past a TV, you've seen this man's work.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/visual-effects-innovator-petro-vlahos-421401

Vlahos had more than 35 patents for camera crane motor controls, screen brightness meters, safe squib systems, cabling designs and junction boxes, projection screens, optical sound tracks and even sonar. He created analog and digital hardware and software versions of Ultimatte.

As the original patents ran out, many other present-day digital blue- and green-screen compositing systems were derived from Ultimatte and entered the marketplace. As a result, every green- or blue-screen shot today employs variants of the Vlahos technique.

Vlahos’ achievements also include his work on sodium and color difference traveling matte systems. His version of the sodium system was used on dozens of Disney films, including Mary Poppins, The Love Bug (1969) and Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971) and was borrowed by Alfred Hitchcock for The Birds (1963) and by Warren Beatty for Dick Tracy (1990).

Vlahos developed the color difference system (the perfected blue-screen system) for Ben-Hur (1959) and such scenes as its legendary chariot race. It was used in hundreds of films, including the first Star Wars trilogy and the Indiana Jones films.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Mar 20, 2013, 03:32 PM

39. Stage, screen, and television actor Frank Thornton, 92.



He's been onstage in London's West End and on screen in Gosford Park, but Frank Thornton is perhaps best known as part of the British ensemble comedy Are You Being Served?

From the Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/tv-and-radio/2013/mar/18/frank-thornton

Born Frank Thornton Ball in Dulwich, south-east London, he was educated at Alleyn's school. He knew he wanted to be an actor from about the age of five, but first became an insurance clerk, taking drama classes at night at the London School of Dramatic Art. As a child, he described himself as "a bit of a loner, not one of the lads. I think I was probably a bit of a prig because I seem to have been stuck with this supercilious persona for as long as I can remember."

From his first professional appearance, in Terence Rattigan's French Without Tears in Co Tipperary, he swiftly graduated to companies led by the actor-managers Donald Wolfit – where he met his future wife, Beryl Evans – and John Gielgud. After reaching the West End and appearing in the first production of Rattigan's Flare Path in 1942, Thornton then spent four years in the real RAF.

After demob, he divided his time between repertory and the West End before his television comedy career took off in 1960 with Michael Bentine's frenetic It's a Square World. Regular appearances followed alongside such comic greats as Tony Hancock (including the celebrated Hancock's Half Hour episode, The Blood Donor), Benny Hill, Eric Sykes, Ronnie Corbett and even Kenny Everett, on whose show he memorably appeared attired as a punk rocker.


(SNIP)

Thornton had more than 60 film credits, including Victim (1961), The Dock Brief (1962), A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (with Zero Mostel, 1966), A Flea in Her Ear (with Rex Harrison, 1968), The Bed Sitting Room (1969), The Old Curiosity Shop (1995) and Gosford Park (2001), as well as the Disney TV adaptation of Great Expectations (1991). His last appearance came in the 2012 film version of Run for Your Wife.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Mar 22, 2013, 03:15 PM

40. Mezzo-soprano Rise Stevens, 99.



You'll all remember her from Going My Way (with Bing Crosby) and The Chocolate Soldier (with Nelson Eddy).

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/rise-stevens-opera-star-of-carmen-who-took-her-talents-to-radio-and-film-dies/2013/03/21/52dd80d0-c5dc-11df-94e1-c5afa35a9e59_story.html

Ms. Stevens won mass appeal by bringing her classical training to recognizable, beloved songs. Her rendition of Franz Schubert’s “Ave Maria” is one of the most memorable moments in “Going My Way.” She was Anna in the production of “The King and I” that inaugurated the Music Theater of Lincoln Center in 1964. And, in the view of a Boston Globe critic, the sultry mezzo sang “Begin the Beguine,” by Cole Porter, “so insinuatingly she could have gotten herself arrested.”

Yet Ms. Stevens never set out to become a pop star. Her Hollywood career came about, she recalled in a 1990 interview with the Washington Times, when she caught the attention of MGM mogul Louis B. Mayer. It did not hurt that Ms. Stevens was about as far from the fat-lady stereotype as an opera singer could be.

After he heard her sing in San Francisco, Ms. Stevens said, Mayer called her in for a screen audition and booked her for “The Chocolate Soldier,” a 1941 film co-starring Nelson Eddy. She enjoyed the project enough to make “Going My Way,” but her life was not in the movies.

“People in the motion picture industry did not think of having a person who would want to go back to opera after having a chance to stay in Hollywood,” Ms. Stevens told the Washington Times. “Mayer told me, ‘What do you mean? I’m offering you this incredible chance at MGM.’ I told him that was my life."

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed May 1, 2013, 08:26 AM

41. Deanna Durbin dies.

 

http://www.deadline.com/2013/04/r-i-p-deanna-durbin-dead/

Canadian singer and actress Deanna Durbin, who enjoyed a short but successful career as a Universal contract star from 1936 to 1948, has died. She was 91. Durbin passed away “a few days ago”, her son Peter H. David told the NYT. Cause of death was not disclosed. Durbin was discovered at age 13 by MGM but moved to Universal the next year. There her debut film Three Smart Girls earned a Best Picture Oscar nomination and launched her career as one of the most popular teen idols of her generation. In 1939 she shared a Juvenile Academy Award with Mickey Rooney for their “significant contribution in bringing to the screen the spirit and personification of youth, and as juvenile players setting a high standard of ability and achievement”. Career highlights include One Hundred Men And A Girl (1937), First Love (1939), and The Amazing Mrs. Holliday (1943). Attempts at a more mature image led the ex-child star to roles in the 1944 noir Christmas Holiday opposite Gene Kelly and 1945′s Lady On A Train. She retired in 1949 and in 1960 earned a star on the Hollywood Walk Of Fame.

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Response to graham4anything (Reply #41)

Wed May 1, 2013, 03:00 PM

42. Sorry to see her go.

Ninety-one is a good long life, but still, an era is ending.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2013/may/01/deanna-durbin

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2013, 10:30 AM

43. Ray Harryhausen, 92, special effects innovator.



This is weeks late, but I wanted to make sure Ray Harryhausen's passing was noted here.

The link will connect you to Fresh Air, a program on NPR (National Public Radio, for those of you who aren't in the U.S. or Canada).

http://www.npr.org/2013/05/09/181947528/remembering-monster-maker-ray-harryhausen

"I do a lot of research when I create a creature," he told Fresh Air's Terry Gross in 2003. "I like to make him logical. That's my theory: Is that if you make them too extreme, too exaggerated, you lose your audience because they're just a grotesque piece of whatnot. You don't know quite what they are. So I try to keep them within harmony of something they've seen."

Harryhausen, a pioneer of stop-motion animation, won an Oscar for special effects with 1949's Mighty Joe Young, about a girl who raises a giant ape.

He went on to create such memorable beasts as the pterodactyl that kidnaps Raquel Welch in One Million Years B.C. and the animated skeleton soldiers in Jason and the Argonauts.


Official website:

http://www.rayharryhausen.com/index.php

IMDB credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0366063/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Jun 6, 2013, 03:01 PM

44. Esther Williams, 91.



http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/moviesnow/la-et-mn-esther-williams-dies-20130606,0,68760.story

Esther Williams, a swimming champion known for the MGM “aqua musicals” of the 1940s and '50s that turned her into a major Hollywood star, died early Thursday in her sleep, her longtime publicist, Harlan Boll, announced. She was 91.

Her films had such titles as “Bathing Beauty,” “Neptune’s Daughter” and “Million Dollar Mermaid” and received mixed reviews, but they packed theaters. For seven years she was in the top 10 box-office list.

She and choreographer Busby Berkeley “turned a swimming pool into a seraglio, a sultan’s dream with breathtaking production numbers of gorgeous girls swimming in geometric shapes around blue water while Esther, with orchids and exotic plants wound round her hair framing that beauteous face, was the centerpiece,” former Times columnist Jim Murray once wrote.

Over 20 years, Williams made 26 movies; later they would be credited with paving the way for synchronized swimming as an Olympic sport.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Jul 31, 2013, 08:08 AM

45. Eileen Brennan

Known by most for her role as the Drill Captain in Goldie Hawn's Private Benjamin (1980) and then her reprise of the role in the TV series for which she won an Emmy and Golden Globe.

Eileen Brennan was an accomplished singer and comedienne. She appeared for two years on Broadway in the original production of Hello, Dolly! as Irene Malloy. She was one of the original cast of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In.

In films she received rave reviews as the waitress in The Last Picture Show (1971) and was the choice of both Robert Redford and Paul Newman to play the role of the brothel madam in The Sting (1973).

Miss Brennan died at the age of 80. RIP

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Aug 2, 2013, 10:27 PM

46. Michael Ansara

Michael Ansara, the rugged character actor who played Klingon commander Kang on three different Star Trek TV series, has died. He was 91. Ansara, who was married to actress Barbara Eden of I Dream of Jeannie fame, died July 31 at his home in Calabasas, Calif., after a prolonged illness, his former publicist, Michael B. Druxman, said.

Ansara is beloved by Star Trek fans as one of only seven actors to play the same character -- in his case legendary Klingon warrior Kang -- on three versions of the sci-fi series: the original (in the 1968 episode "Day of the Dove"), Deep Space Nine (1994's "Blood Oath") and Voyager (1996's "Flashback").

He also had major roles in such films as 1953's Julius Caesar and The Robe (as Judas); 1955's Jupiter’s Darling (his co-star in that film, swimmer-turned-actress Esther Williams, died in June); 1961's Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea (he also appeared in the subsequent ABC series); The Comancheros (1961) with John Wayne; The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965); Guns of the Magnificent Seven (1969); The Bears and I (1974); The Message (1977); and It’s Alive (1974).


http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/michael-ansara-star-trek-kang-dies-598786

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Aug 8, 2013, 10:43 PM

47. Margaret Pellegrini, 89, "Wizard of Oz" actress.



Margaret Pellegrini, who as a teenager was featured in the Munchkin sequence of The Wizard of Oz, has died at age 89. She was one of three surviving members of the Munchkins troupe.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/margaret-pellegrini-surviving-munchkins-oz-dies-article-1.1421107

Then 16 years old, Pellegrini played both the Flowerpot Girl that greets Judy Garland’s Dorothy to Oz and one of the Sleepy Head Kids that appears in a scene a few minutes later. She even got to sing a couple of lines: “Wake up, you sleepyhead. Rub your eyes. Get out of Bed. Wake up, the Wicked Witch is dead.”

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Aug 9, 2013, 10:43 AM

48. Karen Black, 74

Complications from cancer.

Known for Easy Rider, Five Easy Pieces, Nashville and Hitchcock's last fim, Family Plot.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sat Aug 24, 2013, 11:48 PM

49. Stage, TV and film actress Julie Harris.

I am sorry to report that Julie Harris (East of Eden, The Haunting) has left us. She was 87.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-207_162-57599994/broadway-star-julie-harris-dies/

The 5-foot-4 Harris, blue-eyed with delicate features and reddish-gold hair, made her Broadway debut in 1945 in a short-lived play called "It's a Gift." Five years later, at the age of 24, Harris was cast as Frankie, a lonely 12-year-old tomboy on the brink of adolescence, in "The Member of the Wedding," Carson McCullers' stage version of her wistful novel.

The critics raved about Harris, with Brooks Atkinson in The New York Times calling her performance "extraordinary — vibrant, full of anguish and elation."

"That play was really the beginning of everything big for me," Harris had said.

The actress appeared in the 1952 film version, too, with her original Broadway co-stars, Ethel Waters and Brandon De Wilde, and received an Academy Award nomination.

Harris won her first Tony Award for playing Sally Bowles, the confirmed hedonist in "I Am a Camera," adapted by John van Druten from Christopher Isherwood's "Berlin Stories." The play later became the stage and screen musical "Cabaret." In her second Tony-winning performance, Harris played a much more spiritual character, Joan of Arc in Lillian Hellman's adaptation of Jean Anouilh's "The Lark." The play had a six-month run, primarily because of the notices for Harris.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Aug 27, 2013, 11:38 PM

50. Cinematographer Gilbert Taylor, 99.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/27/arts/gilbert-taylor-celebrated-hollywood-cinematographer-dies-at-99.html?_r=0

Gilbert Taylor, the British cinematographer behind hit movies like “Star Wars,” “The Omen” and “Dr. Strangelove,” died on Friday at his home on the Isle of Wight. He was 99.

His death was confirmed by his wife, Dee, the BBC reported.

Mr. Taylor brought a cinéma vérité sensibility to black-and-white pictures like the 1964 Beatles comedy “A Hard Day’s Night” and Stanley Kubrick’s cold war satire “Dr. Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb.” He ensured that the battle footage in “Dr. Strangelove” was disturbingly realistic by shooting it like a documentary.


I always list the IMBD credits, but do check these out. It's quite a varied list.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0852405/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Mon Oct 14, 2013, 12:22 AM

51. Stanley Kauffmann, film critic 97.

Last edited Tue Oct 15, 2013, 06:33 AM - Edit history (1)

Stanley Kauffmann was film critic for The New Republic for over 50 years. Considered by some as 'old school' for his preference of films with a beginning, middle and an end. He avoided the fawning over the 'auteur of the moment' by some other critics.

He was influential in the acceptance by American audiences of foreign films from all countries including the British Ealing comedies like "Kind Hearts And Coronets."

He left film for a brief stint as NY Times Drama Critic in 1966 that did not end well. After writing that the many gay playwrights could not convincingly portray heterosexual relationships he was fired.

Returning to The New Republic he continued his literate film reviews for another 40+ years.

RIP

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Oct 17, 2013, 06:59 AM

52. Ed Lauter - 74

Dependable character actor who played the tough as nails coach, detective or Army Officer he is credited with 204 appearances in movie and TV roles that spanned four decades. He is memorable in The Longest Yard (1974) and can be seen in the 2005 re-make.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Lauter

RIP

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Oct 27, 2013, 09:50 AM

53. Hal Needham, stuntman & director.

If you were amazed by a daring, breathtaking stunt in an action movie from the last 40 years it was probably Hal Needham under those trampling horses or in that crashing car.

His stunt work was so flawless and creative that he was requested by name to stunt for the biggest stars, from John Wayne to Burt Reynolds. Later in his career he became a director of films such as the Smokey & The Bandit films and the Cannonball Run films.

Needham was 82. RIP
.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Oct 27, 2013, 10:32 AM

54. Director Patrice Chereau, 68.



http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2013/oct/08/patrice-chereau

Unusually for a director, Patrice Chéreau, who has died of lung cancer aged 68, had more or less equally prestigious careers in the theatre, cinema and opera. Although he was internationally known from films such as La Reine Margot (1994) and his groundbreaking production of Richard Wagner's Ring cycle at Bayreuth (1976), he was renowned in his native France mostly for his "must-see" stage productions, especially during his long stints as co-director of the Théâtre National Populaire (1971-77) and the Théâtre des Amandiers (1982-90).

At these two subsidised theatres, in Villeurbanne, near Lyons, and Nanterre, in western Paris, respectively, Chéreau was able to introduce modern plays and bring a freshness to bear on the classics, particularly Marivaux, whose La Dispute he directed to acclaim at the TNP in three different versions in the 1970s. At the Amandiers, his sensational 1983 production of Jean Genet's Les Paravents (The Screens) used the auditorium as an extension of the stage.

(SNIP)

In contrast to the rather melancholy mode of his first few films, La Reine Margot was a rumbustious adaptation of the Alexandre Dumas novel set during the religious war between the Catholics and the Protestants in late-16th-century France. With its battle scenes, sumptuous settings and depiction of the St Bartholomew's day massacre, it was Chéreau's most expensive and – at 161 minutes – longest film and his biggest box-office success by far. It led to a whole series of historical epics from France.

On a smaller scale and with much handheld camerawork, Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train (Ceux Qui M'Aiment Prendront le Train, 1998), about the interplay of assorted characters on their way to the funeral of a misanthropic, bisexual minor painter (Jean-Louis Trintignant), was melodramatic, sentimental and emptily wordy.


Film credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0161717/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Oct 30, 2013, 07:02 AM

55. Actor Nigel Davenport dies at 85

BBC News
30 October 2013

Actor Nigel Davenport dies at 85

During a career spanning more than 50 years, he appeared in such films as A Man for All Seasons and Chariots of Fire and the TV series Howards' Way.

He worked in theatre, film and television in productions ranging from Shakespeare to soap operas.

His son, the actor Jack Davenport, is best known for his roles in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies and BBC series This Life.

Nigel Davenport, who died on Friday, studied English at Trinity College, Oxford. There he joined the Oxford University Drama Society and decided to pursue a career in acting...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-24738939

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Response to theHandpuppet (Reply #55)

Wed Oct 30, 2013, 07:49 AM

56. I didn't realize Jack Davenport was his son.

Between this obituary and Noel Harrison's, this has been a week of Six Degrees of Separation.

Nigel Davenport's credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0202638/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2013, 11:32 AM

57. Actor/singer/director Noel Harrison, 79.



For some reason I never knew he was the son of Rex Harrison and the father of Cathryn Harrison. The former needs no introduction, and the latter has been in myriad British dramas (Story of a Marriage, Clarissa).

I'd also lost track of him over the years, aside from his appearance in the Henry Jaglom film Déjà Vu.

BBC obit:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-24621444

The son of the actor Rex Harrison, he was best known for recording the hit song The Windmills Of Your Mind on The Thomas Crown Affair soundtrack.

It won best song at the 1968 Oscars and was later covered by artists including Dusty Springfield.

(SNIP)

He once said, of recording The Windmills Of Your Mind: "It didn't seem like a big deal at the time. I went to the studio one afternoon and sang it and pretty much forgot about it."

Harrison continued: "I didn't realise until later what a timeless, beautiful piece Michel LeGrand and the Bergmans had written. It turned out to be my most notable piece of work."


Here's a nice tribute, and a look at Harrison's multifaceted life:

http://www.torquayheraldexpress.co.uk/pleasure-meet-Noel-Harrison-rare-Tinseltown/story-20007299-detail/story.html

Concealed by Noel Harrison’s modest exterior was the determination not just of a survivor, but of a winner. It may come as a surprise to learn that he represented Great Britain in the Winter Olympics of 1952 and 1956.

He was the British downhill and slalom champion in 1953, followed by winning the giant slalom championship in 1955.

In 1969 Noel decided that he “wanted to get the hell out of Hollywood and do something different”. The celebrity life had lost its excitement; there was a complete lack of anonymity and privacy. In those days, he said, it was bad enough, but nowadays it must be insufferable.

This led to him buying a 320 acre property for $23,000 in Nova Scotia, where his wooden house burnt down. So, after a couple of lessons from a neighbouring farmer in ‘God’s own country’ on how to avoid injuring himself too seriously with his newly bought and non-Health & Safety-approved chainsaw, he set to and built another one. An example unlikely to be followed by most of today’s ‘celebrities.’


IMDB credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0365786/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Mon Dec 9, 2013, 11:58 PM

58. Actress Eleanor Parker, 91.

The New York Times took the high road in their obituary and headline, mentioning her Oscar nominations, but several other news outlets mention the nasty baroness from The Sound of Music in the headlines. Sigh.

I remember being startled to realize that she played Paul Henreid's selfless wife in Between Two Worlds.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/10/movies/eleanor-parker-91-oscar-nominated-actress-dies.html?hpw&rref=television

She was nominated for an Oscar for dramatic roles as a wrongly convicted young prisoner in “Caged” (1950), a police officer’s neglected wife in “Detective Story” (1951) and an opera star with polio in “Interrupted Melody” (1955), a biography of the Australian soprano Marjorie Lawrence. She also received an Emmy Award nomination in 1963 for an episode of “The Eleventh Hour,” an NBC series about psychiatric cases.

If she never became a star, admirers contended, it was because of her versatility. Sometimes a blonde, sometimes a brunette, often a redhead, Ms. Parker made indelible impressions but submerged herself in a wide range of characters, from a war hero’s noble fiancée in “Pride of the Marines” (1945) to W. Somerset Maugham’s vicious waitress-prostitute in a remake of “Of Human Bondage” (1946).


(SNIP)

In 1953, with two recent Oscar nominations to her credit, Ms. Parker talked to The New York Times about her good career luck so far. “Things have a way of working out right for me,” she said, adding a bit later, “I maintain that if you work, believe in yourself and do what is right for you without stepping all over others, the way somehow opens up.”

“I even got my three wishes granted,” she said in the same interview. “To be in pictures, to give Mother a mink coat and buy the folks a house.”


IMDB credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0662223/



With John Garfield in Pride of the Marines

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Thu Dec 12, 2013, 04:06 AM

59. TCM Remembers 2013

TCM has started showing their "TCM Remembers" for 2013, a remembrance of those associated with films who passed away in 2013. Many of those mentioned have already been remembered within this thread, but I noticed at least one pair who passed underneath my own personal radar.


Virginia Gibson

Virginia Gibson, a singer, dancer and actress who played one of the smitten girls in the classic MGM musical Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, died April 25 in Newtown, Pa. She was 88.

A regular on Broadway for more than decade starting in the 1940s, Gibson received a Tony Award nomination in 1957 for best featured actress in a musical for her work in Happy Hunting opposite Ethel Merman.

In director Stanley Donen’s Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), Gibson plays Liza, the dark-haired beauty who winds up with Ephraim (Jacques d’Amboise) and leads the girls in the musical number “June Bride.” The film, one of the most beloved movie musicals in Hollywood history, was nominated for best picture, losing out to On the Waterfront.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/seven-brides-seven-brothers-virginia-gibson-dies-451646


Matt Mattox

Matt Mattox, a dancer, choreographer and teacher who helped shape contemporary jazz dance in the United States and Europe, died in France on Feb. 18. He was 91.

Mr. Mattox, who had made his home in France for many years, had a prominent career dancing in films and on Broadway in the 1940s and afterward. Though he was not as well known as some of the celebrated Hollywood dancers of his era, he was by all accounts every bit their peer.

“He was one of the greatest male dancers that ever was on a performing stage,” Jacques d’Amboise, the distinguished dancer and choreographer, said in a telephone interview. “He’s equal to Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly.”

As a dancer, Mr. Mattox was celebrated for his “ballpoint ease, pinpoint precision, and catlike agility,” as Dance magazine wrote in 2007. He was perhaps best known to moviegoers as the young, bearded Caleb Pontipee, one of the marriageable frontiersmen at the heart of the 1954 film “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers,” directed by Stanley Donen and choreographed by Michael Kidd.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/25/arts/dance/matt-mattox-dancer-in-seven-brides-dies-at-91.html?_r=0


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Response to Staph (Reply #59)

Thu Dec 12, 2013, 03:44 PM

60. Two from the "Seven Brides" cast.

Thanks for posting that; I'd entirely missed the notices.

I just discovered this blog posting on Virginia Gibson, who was of course one of the standouts among the dancers in Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.



With Jacques d'Amboise

http://laurasmiscmusings.blogspot.com/2013/05/seven-brides-dancer-virginia-gibson.html



Matt Mattox airborne

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 01:07 AM

61. Actress Audrey Totter, 95.



http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/audrey-totter-film-noir-femme-fatale-dies-at-95/2013/12/14/09fc25a8-64ec-11e3-a373-0f9f2d1c2b61_story.html?tid=pm_pop

Audrey Totter, an actress who specialized in playing temptresses, dangerous dames and women harboring dark schemes in a series of movies from Hollywood’s film noir period of the 1940s and ’50s, died Dec. 12 at a hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 95.

(SNIP)

Only later was she recognized as one of film noir’s biggest stars, along with other actresses including Gloria Grahame, Jane Greer and Barbara Stanwyck. Considered B-movie throwaways at the time, noir films are now one of the most avidly studied genres from Hollywood’s golden age.

“For years nobody bothered with me — didn’ t know who I was, didn’t care,” she told the Toronto Star in 2000. “Now I’m recognized on the street, I’m asked for my autograph, I get loads of fan mail.”

(SNIP)

“Who knew these movies would be so popular 50 years later? Maybe it’s because the world isn’t like that anymore. The fantasy of it. They painted with light in those days, it’s a look that just isn’t done anymore.”



Credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0869429/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 01:26 PM

62. Peter O'Toole dead at age 81

Sadly, we lost one of the acting greats yesterday:

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2013/dec/15/peter-o-toole-dies-lawrence-arabia


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Response to lavenderdiva (Reply #62)

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 01:37 PM

63. I just heard!



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Response to CBHagman (Reply #63)

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 04:10 PM

64. ooh! great clip CBH!

I loved him in everything he was in- he was one of the greats!!

hope you are having a happy holiday-

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 08:11 PM

65. Actress Joan Fontaine, 96.

I'm speechless, but TCM has this tribute from a few years back.

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Response to CBHagman (Reply #65)

Sun Dec 15, 2013, 10:05 PM

66. To be honest, I wasn't sure that she was still alive.

I know Olivia de Havilland is, and last time I saw her in interview, looking amazing for her age - I think she was close to 90 at the time.

But if Joan Fontaine had done nothing other than Rebecca and Suspicion, she'd deservedly be remembered.



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Response to CBHagman (Reply #65)

Mon Dec 16, 2013, 12:05 AM

67. A quote attributed to Joan Fontaine, from IMDb:

I married first, won the Oscar before Olivia did, and if I die first, she'll undoubtedly be livid because I beat her to it!"

Oh, dear!

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Response to Matilda (Reply #67)

Mon Dec 16, 2013, 07:25 AM

68. Almost all I can think of is their years-long feud.

I haven't had a chance to read the obituaries yet, but as far as I know, Joan Fontaine died without reconciling with her sister. That's very sad on many levels, not least of which most of us don't get to live as long as they have.

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Response to CBHagman (Reply #68)

Mon Dec 16, 2013, 07:07 PM

69. I believe they were still unreconciled.

And it appeared to be over nothing much at all.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Jan 7, 2014, 10:40 PM

70. Producer Saul Zaentz, 92.



http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/jan/05/saul-zaentz

The career of the film producer Saul Zaentz, who has died aged 92, was marked not only by his independence (his productions were often largely self-funded) but also by his dedication to each individual film. Unlike most producers, who have numerous projects on the go, Zaentz worked on just one at a time. This resulted in a relatively short CV but one with a high share of Oscars, including three best picture winners: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975), Amadeus (1984) and The English Patient (1996).

IMBD credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0951763/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue Jan 7, 2014, 11:40 PM

71. Actress Juanita Moore, 99.



Her credits included Cabin in the Sky, Pinky, Imitation of Life, The Helen Morgan Story, and even Judging Amy!

http://www.latimes.com/obituaries/la-me-juanita-moore-20140103,0,6850260.story#axzz2pmKiJHY9

Moore, who danced in chorus lines at swanky clubs in New York and Paris before throwing herself into her film career, died Wednesday after collapsing in her Los Angeles home. She was 99, according to her grandson Kirk Kelleykahn.

Whatever the case, she was an imposing presence — "a large, handsome woman who in her later years might have played Bessie Smith or Ma Rainey," wrote author Sam Staggs in "Born to Be Hurt," a 2009 book about "Imitation of Life."

In the film, Moore moves in with a character played by Lana Turner as the women, both single, raise teenage daughters.


http://www.latimes.com/obituaries/la-me-juanita-moore-20140103,0,6850260.story#ixzz2pmLCCtNl

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0601428/?ref_=nv_sr_1[

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Jan 17, 2014, 10:52 PM

72. Ruth Robinson Duccini, 95, last female member of the "Oz" Munchkins.

http://www.latimes.com/obituaries/la-et-mn-ruth-robinson-duccini-95-dies-oz-munchkin-20140116,0,427370.story#axzz2qia5mv6v

Ruth Robinson Duccini, one of the last members of the troupe of diminutive actors who played Munchkins in the 1939 film classic "The Wizard of Oz," died Thursday after a brief illness at a hospice in Las Vegas, said her son, Fred Duccini. She was 95.

The actress, who lived for many years in Los Angeles before moving to Arizona and later Nevada, was one of 124 "little people," then called midgets, who appeared with Judy Garland in the musical fantasy based on the novel by L. Frank Baum.

In her later years she appeared at "Oz" events across the country. She returned to Hollywood in 2007 when the Munchkins received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.


Except for Jerry Maren (born Gerard Marenghi), there are no other known members of the Munchkins troupe alive at this writing, at least if we're talking about the adults in the Munchkinland sequence.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 11:59 AM

73. Academy Award-winning actor Maximilian Schell, 83.



I was astonished by a few of the details in his obituary, including revelations about talents beyond those as actor and director.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/celebrities/oscar-winning-actor-maximilian-schell-dies-at-83/2014/02/01/d883f642-8b4a-11e3-a760-a86415d0944d_story.html

The son of Swiss playwright Hermann Ferdinand Schell and Austrian stage actress Noe von Nordberg, Schell was born in Vienna on Dec. 8, 1930 and raised in Switzerland after his family fled Germany’s annexation of his homeland.

Schell followed in the footsteps of his older sister Maria and brother Carl, making his stage debut in 1952. He then appeared in a number of German films before relocating to Hollywood in 1958.

By then, Maria Schell was already an international film star, winning the best actress award at the 1954 Cannes Film Festival for her performance in “The Last Bridge.”

Maximilian made his Hollywood debut in Edward Dmytryk’s “The Young Lions,” a World War II drama starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift and Dean Martin.


IMDB credits:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0001703/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Sun Feb 16, 2014, 07:51 AM

74. Shirley Temple

Last edited Thu Apr 10, 2014, 07:16 PM - Edit history (1)

April 23, 1928 - February 10, 2014

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Apr 9, 2014, 10:58 PM

75. Mickey Rooney, Legendary Actor, Dies at 93

"Mickey Rooney, the pint-sized actor who was one of MGM’s giant box office attractions in the late ’30s and early ’40s, died on Sunday at his home in North Hollywood. He was 93.

"As adept at comedy as drama and an excellent singer and dancer, Rooney was regarded as the consummate entertainer. During a prolific career on stage and screen that spanned eight decades (“I’ve been working all my life, but it seems longer,” he once said), he was nominated for four Academy Awards and received two special Oscars, the Juvenile Award in 1939 (shared with Deanna Durbin) and one in 1983 for his body of work.

"He also appeared on series and TV and in made for television movies, one of which, “Bill,” the touching story of a mentally challenged man, won him an Emmy. He was Emmy nominated three other times. And for “Sugar Babies,” a musical revue in which he starred with Ann Miller, he was nominated for a Tony in 1980."


http://variety.com/2014/film/news/mickey-rooney-golden-age-box-office-giant-dies-at-93-1201153308/


(Though this story has been all over General Discussion and the DU Lounge, it seemed only proper that we remember and celebrate the Mick here in Classic Films.)


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Response to Staph (Reply #75)

Sat Apr 12, 2014, 11:55 PM

76. I watched "The Courtship of Andy Hardy" today on TMC.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034618/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_196

He was a cute young man and Donna Reed was a knockout when she wanted to be.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Mon May 26, 2014, 11:20 AM

77. Herb Jeffries, star of African-American cowboy movies.

I wasn't at all familiar with his story! Read on.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/herb-jeffries-jazz-balladeer-and-star-of-all-black-cowboy-movies-dies/2014/05/26/a2416490-c5da-11df-94e1-c5afa35a9e59_story.html?hpid=z5

Herb Jeffries, a jazz balladeer whose matinee-idol looks won him fame in the late 1930s as the “Bronze Buckaroo” — the first singing star of all-black cowboy movies for segregated audiences — died May 25 at a hospital in West Hills, Calif. He was widely believed to be 100, but for years he insisted he was much older.

The cause was stomach and heart ailments, said Raymond Strait, a friend of 70 years who had been working with Mr. Jeffries on his autobiography. Mr. Jeffries liked to exaggerate his age to shock listeners. “He wanted people to say, ‘Wow, he can still sing pretty good for 111,’ ” Strait said.

Mr. Jeffries had a seven-decade career on film, television, record and in nightclubs. His baritone voice — extraordinarily rich but delicate — was memorably captured on his greatest musical success, a 1941 hit recording of “Flamingo” with Duke Ellington’s big band.

With a towering physique and a square jaw, Mr. Jeffries was perfectly suited to capitalize on the singing-cowboy movie craze that Gene Autry and Roy Rogers popularized in the 1930s.


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Response to Staph (Original post)

Tue May 27, 2014, 07:41 PM

78. Gordon Willis, Cinematographer

Gordon Hugh Willis, Jr., ASC (May 28, 1931 – May 18, 2014) was an American cinematographer. He was best known for his work on Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather series as well as Woody Allen's Annie Hall and Manhattan.

His fellow cinematographer William Fraker had called Willis' work "a milestone in visual storytelling", while one critic suggested that "more than any other director of photography, Willis defined the cinematic look of the 1970s: sophisticated compositions in which bolts of light and black put the decade's moral ambiguities into stark relief".

When the International Cinematographers Guild conducted a survey in 2003, they placed Willis among the ten most influential cinematographers in history.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Willis







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Response to Auggie (Reply #78)

Tue May 27, 2014, 10:02 PM

79. What a beautiful post.

And thank you for providing the tribute. I had Gordon Willis on my list of figures in the film industry that belonged on this thread.

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Response to CBHagman (Reply #79)

Wed May 28, 2014, 07:05 PM

80. Thanks ...

Willis certainly pushed the envelope. His contributions to American cinema are huge.

I think the cinematographer is the most unheralded artist on set.

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Jun 20, 2014, 08:57 AM

81. Academy Award-winning cinematographer Oswald Morris, 98.

There are a number of film figures who have left us recently and I've been meaning to post their obituaries quite literally for months. I'm going to start catching up, beginning with Oswald Morris.

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/mar/19/oswald-morris

The Oscar-winning British cinematographer Oswald Morris, who has died aged 98, will be remembered for many classics, including Moulin Rouge, Fiddler on the Roof, Moby Dick and Lolita. He worked with some of the great directors, John Huston, Sidney Lumet, Carol Reed, Stanley Kubrick and Franco Zeffirelli. Many of Morris's films are landmarks in the history of colour cinematography. For Moulin Rouge (1952) he used filters to create a style reminiscent of paintings by Toulouse-Lautrec. For Fiddler on the Roof (1971), which won him an Oscar, he filmed with a silk stocking over the lens to give a sepia effect.

Morris also shot popular favourites such as The Guns of Navarone (1961), Oliver! (1968), The Spy Who Came in from the Cold (1965) and The Man Who Would Be King (1975), and photographed acting luminaries: Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Gregory Peck and Humphrey Bogart. He was at the height of his profession for 30 years.


His credits, as per IMDB:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0005807/

Pictured: Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Jun 20, 2014, 09:02 AM

82. Actress Mary Anderson, 96.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/gone-wind-actress-mary-anderson-694266

Mary Anderson, who played Maybelle Merriwether in Gone With the Wind and was one of the nine survivors cast adrift from a torpedoed ship in Alfred Hitchcock’s Lifeboat, has died. She was 96.

(SNIP)

While attending Howard College (now Samford University) in her native Birmingham, Ala., Anderson was discovered by director George Cukor, who was searching for an actress to play Scarlett O’Hara in the adaptation of Margaret Mitchell’s Civil War epic Gone With the Wind (1939).

Cukor was fired, and the role of O’Hara went to Vivien Leigh, who went on to capture the best actress Oscar. Anderson was cast in a small role as Maybelle, Scarlett’s cousin and the wife of Louisiana native Rene Picard (Alberto Morin).

In Lifeboat (1944), Anderson played U.S. Army nurse Alice Mackenzie opposite Tallulah Bankhead, William Bendix, Walter Slezak, John Hodiak and Hume Cronyn in the claustrophobic Hitchcock drama.


IMDB entry:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0027156/

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Jun 20, 2014, 09:38 AM

83. "Gone with the Wind" cast member Alicia Rhett, 98.



Yes, Rhett really was her surname, and she was even a native Southerner, born in Savannah and relocated to Charleston.

TCM has a lovely write-up:

http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/person/160752|180318/Alicia-Rhett/

http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/03/showbiz/alicia-rhett-dies/

Rhett was doing local theater productions when she was spotted for a role in the 1939 classic "Gone With the Wind," a film based on Margaret Mitchell's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel.

She was cast as India Wilkes, sister of plantation owner Ashley Wilkes who was at odds with Scarlet O'Hara, played by Vivien Leigh.

While the runaway success and continued notoriety of "Gone With the Wind" made Rhett recognizable nationwide, she did not pursue the limelight. Instead of heading to Hollywood, Rhett went back to Charleston.

In the coastal South Carolina city, she developed a reputation as a talented artist, producing works seen in the state library and in many plantations in the area, as well as sketches of her fellow "Gone With the Wind" cast members, according to Borts.




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Response to Staph (Original post)

Fri Jun 20, 2014, 09:56 AM

84. Dancer Marc Platt, 100, of "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers."

Platt is the one in the purple shirt.



No, the age is not a typo.

And his bio is just amazing!

http://www.theguardian.com/stage/2014/apr/09/marc-platt

Marc Platt was one of the first Americans to join the Ballets Russes, and at the time of his death, aged 100, among the very last survivors. Tall and loose-limbed, with red hair and freckles, he must have seemed an unlikely addition to the ranks of the largely Russian company. But when Michel Fokine saw Platoff – as he had been hastily renamed – playing the role of Dodon, the archetypal foolish tsar in his ballet Le Coq d'Or, the choreographer exclaimed: "I didn't think anyone could be more Russian."

In 1943, Platt created the leading role of Curly in the dream ballet sequence of the Broadway hit Oklahoma!, and he also appeared as a minor character in the 1955 film version of the show. His two best-known film roles, however, were as brother Daniel Pontipee in the musical Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) and in the Rita Hayworth film Tonight and Every Night (1945). In the latter, Platt is shown auditioning for a theatre similar to the Windmill in London. Having failed to bring music with him, he dances to music from the radio, changing styles as the theatre owner switches stations, moving instantly and effortlessly between classical, tap, swing and flamenco in a tour de force.

The son of a French violinist who had moved to the US and a soprano singer, Marcel Le Plat was born in Pasadena, California. The family travelled widely but eventually settled in Seattle, where Marcel studied first at the Cornish school (now Cornish College of the Arts) and then for eight years with the dancer and trainer Mary Ann Wells. It was Wells who, in 1935, arranged an audition for him with Wassily de Basil and Léonide Massine, respectively director and choreographer of the Ballets Russes. Once accepted, he immediately joined the company on its tour, making his stage debut a few days later.

By Platt's own account, the occasion was little short of a disaster. He was taller than any of the troupe's other men, and once he was on stage his ill-fitting costume began to fall apart. Worse was to come with the last ballet of the evening, the Polovtsian dances from Prince Igor. Equipped like all his fellow dancers with a genuine bow, crossing the stage at full speed he mistakenly turned right instead of left and caught his weapon in that of his neighbour, thus causing a major pileup of warriors. "What you were trying to do? Kill everybody?" hissed one of his fellow dancers, adding, "This is ballet. Not war."


This is fun:



His IMDB page:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0686885/?ref_=fn_nm_nm_2


Always do what you love as long as you can. - Marc Platt

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Jun 25, 2014, 06:43 AM

85. Actor Eli Wallach, 98.



http://variety.com/2014/film/news/eli-wallach-the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-villain-dies-at-98-1201246070/

Tony- and Emmy-winning actor Eli Wallach, a major proponent of “the Method” style of acting best known for his starring role in Elia Kazan’s film “Baby Doll” and for his role as villain Tuco in iconic spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” died on Tuesday, according to the New York Times. He was 98.

On the bigscreen Wallach had few turns as a leading man, but none was as strong as his first starring role in 1956’s “Baby Doll,” in which he played a leering cotton gin owner intent on seducing the virgin bride (Carroll Baker) of his business rival (Karl Malden). But he appeared in more than 80 films, offering colorful turns in character roles in movies such as “The Magnificent Seven,” “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,” “Nuts,” “Lord Jim,” “The Misfits” and “The Two Jakes.”

The actor, who appeared in a wide variety of stage, screen and television roles, was often paired with his wife Anne Jackson, particularly onstage. In 1948 he was one of the core of 20 who joined Kazan, Cheryl Crawford and Bobby Lewis in starting the Actors Studio, where he studied with Lee Strasberg. Others included Jackson, David Wayne, Marlon Brando, Patricia Neal and Maureen Stapleton.

Wallach received an Honorary Academy Award at the second annual Governors Awards, presented on Nov. 13, 2010, for “a lifetime’s worth of indelible screen characters.”

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Response to Staph (Original post)

Wed Jul 9, 2014, 09:32 AM

86. Actor Dickie Jones, 87, who gave Disney's "Pinocchio" a voice

Yet he did so much more, appearing in everything from rodeos to radio to films such as Stella Dallas and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/dickie-jones-child-cowboy-who-became-the-voice-pinocchio-in-disney-film-dies-at-87/2014/07/08/a22918f4-06cc-11e4-a0dd-f2b22a257353_story.html

Despite more than 100 film and television credits, Dickie Jones was best known for a movie in which his face was never seen. As a child actor, he voiced the role of Pinocchio in the enduring 1940 animated film by Walt Disney.

Mr. Jones, who died July 7 at age 87, began performing when he was 4 and was billed as “the world’s youngest trick rider and trick roper” in his native Texas. He became a protege of the cowboy actor Hoot Gibson and had begun appearing in a series of low-budget westerns by the time he was 7.

After roles in the “Our Gang” serial and in the 1937 melodrama “Stella Dallas,” starring Barbara Stanwyck, Mr. Jones won an audition to become the voice of Pinocchio. He beat out 200 other child actors for the part.

“Pinocchio” was Disney’s second full-length animated feature, following “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” (1937).


It seems that as a young boy he had a number of small, at times uncredited roles in classic movies -- Young Mr. Lincoln, Destry Rides Again, etc.

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0427934/



With Jimmy Stewart in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

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