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Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:17 PM

Pressure canners.

I am thinking of buying one. What do I need to know (besides not putting out my eye)? Any brand suggestions?

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Reply Pressure canners. (Original post)
TNDemo Apr 2012 OP
OffWithTheirHeads Apr 2012 #1
TNDemo Apr 2012 #2
OffWithTheirHeads Apr 2012 #3
likesmountains 52 Apr 2012 #4
HeiressofBickworth Apr 2012 #5
HopeHoops Apr 2012 #6
amerikat Apr 2012 #7
jmowreader Apr 2012 #8

Response to TNDemo (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:05 PM

1. Funny you should ask.

I just watched an episode of America's Test Kitchen. They tested three electric Pressure cookers and one old fashiond kind.

The bottom line seems to be, don't buy an electric one and any of the modern PCs on the market are very safe. I got one for my birthday last October to expand my canning and preserving proclivities but, to tell the truth, I havn't yet found anything I wanted to put by on sale cheap enough to make it worthwhile yet so I havn't used it yet. You should be abloe to get a good one for under $100.00. There are some available on e-bay for about 80 bucks.

The only advice I have is that if you are planning to can food with it, get a big one. A lot of recipies are labor intensive and you might as well put up as much as you are able if you are going to do it at all.

Good luck and let the folks at the cooking and baking forum know what you end up with and why.

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Response to OffWithTheirHeads (Reply #1)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:15 PM

2. Thanks. I just have a water bath one now.

Apparently for things like green beans you need a pressure canner. Another adventure in food preservation. I should visit that forum.

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Response to TNDemo (Reply #2)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 09:58 PM

3. If you hurry, you can see the pickled Asparagus I just put up!

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Response to TNDemo (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 10:09 PM

4. I have a Presto canner (bought in 1978) and used every fall for canning.

In over 30 years of use I have only replaced the gasket one time. It's a sturdy, heavy pot. I'm not sure about newer models, but if you can find an old one on ebay or thrift shop you won't be sorry.

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Response to TNDemo (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:38 AM

5. I used to have one

I used it for canning vegetables and spaghetti meat sauce (a requirement to avoid botulism). I used it for several seasons, but then, life changed, the number in the household dropped, so I didn't do any more canning for about 20 years. I do jams and jellies now but that's all. I always wanted to try the pressure cooker on a roast or fowl, as I've read that it's possible, but I never got around to it and now I no longer have it. I've seen small ones in the stores which would be suitable for meals rather than canning.

If you are buying a used one, I would suggest getting a new gasket for it -- the rubber wears out over time and won't hold the steam pressure that builds up in it.

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Response to TNDemo (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 09:36 AM

6. Get the Ball Blue Book on canning and preserving (Any Agway will have it) first - read, then buy.

 

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Response to TNDemo (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 10:08 AM

7. I have an All American Pressure Canner.

I got mine at a yard sale for $10 bucks. These things are very well made
and have a machined metal to metal seal and require no gasket. Still
made in the US. Expensive but will last forever. Maybe you could find a used one
like I did.

http://www.allamericancanner.com/allamericanpressurecanner.htm

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Response to TNDemo (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 09:23 PM

8. They're great for heating food pouches

I went on a field exercise with the Canadian Army in 1993. They take pressure cookers to the field. You throw your whole squad's MRE entree pouches in there, put in some water, close it up and stick it on the fire. A few minutes later your food's so hot you need welding gloves for potholders.

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