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Thu Apr 5, 2012, 04:42 PM

Post a photo of your first computer. Tell us all the details!



I had one of those 'all-in-on' Compaq Presario desktops. I think I paid around $1000 for it and thought I had this rocking computer because it had 320mg hard drive. It ran on Windows 3.1 and it had a whooping 8k of memory to it. WOOHOO!!!!!

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Reply Post a photo of your first computer. Tell us all the details! (Original post)
LynneSin Apr 2012 OP
jakeXT Apr 2012 #1
HopeHoops Apr 2012 #9
Defectata Apr 2012 #45
onlyadream Apr 2012 #101
Tunkamerica Apr 2012 #120
Archae Apr 2012 #128
Johnny Noshoes Apr 2012 #131
Archae Apr 2012 #2
The Velveteen Ocelot Apr 2012 #3
greiner3 Apr 2012 #6
The Velveteen Ocelot Apr 2012 #7
harmonicon Apr 2012 #47
Old and In the Way Apr 2012 #34
laundry_queen Apr 2012 #93
ChazII Apr 2012 #94
tru Apr 2012 #133
OrwellwasRight Apr 2012 #149
Tony_FLADEM Apr 2012 #4
RebelOne Apr 2012 #8
HopeHoops Apr 2012 #10
Papagoose Apr 2012 #77
csziggy Apr 2012 #148
benld74 Apr 2012 #5
CBGLuthier Apr 2012 #11
harmonicon Apr 2012 #68
CBGLuthier Apr 2012 #108
harmonicon Apr 2012 #110
Nostradammit Apr 2012 #96
Rob H. Apr 2012 #12
Dead_Parrot Apr 2012 #22
the_chinuk Apr 2012 #53
Unca Jim Apr 2012 #78
Rob H. Apr 2012 #113
JCMach1 Apr 2012 #100
bobhuntsman Apr 2012 #115
hobbit709 Apr 2012 #13
MannyGoldstein Apr 2012 #138
hobbit709 Apr 2012 #139
MannyGoldstein Apr 2012 #141
X_Digger Apr 2012 #14
LineReply :
ohiosmith Apr 2012 #15
haydukelives Apr 2012 #155
Xipe Totec Apr 2012 #16
Xipe Totec Apr 2012 #17
Johnny Noshoes Apr 2012 #134
OriginalGeek Apr 2012 #18
kentauros Apr 2012 #26
Thor_MN Apr 2012 #87
ElboRuum Apr 2012 #102
demilib Apr 2012 #124
denbot Apr 2012 #19
hobbit709 Apr 2012 #30
denbot Apr 2012 #97
Tom1960 Apr 2012 #122
TheMightyFavog Apr 2012 #20
UTUSN Apr 2012 #21
malmapus Apr 2012 #23
pokerfan Apr 2012 #24
eppur_se_muova Apr 2012 #60
pokerfan Apr 2012 #61
eppur_se_muova Apr 2012 #63
pokerfan Apr 2012 #71
ThoughtCriminal Apr 2012 #85
hunter Apr 2012 #25
sakabatou Apr 2012 #27
Jazzgirl Apr 2012 #28
Meiko Apr 2012 #29
MichaelMcGuire Apr 2012 #31
MrScorpio Apr 2012 #32
lastlib Apr 2012 #33
Sherman A1 Apr 2012 #59
Hoyt Apr 2012 #62
lastlib Apr 2012 #67
BiggJawn Apr 2012 #89
Hoyt Apr 2012 #140
tru Apr 2012 #135
Paper Roses Apr 2012 #145
Submariner Apr 2012 #35
bluedigger Apr 2012 #36
DesertDiamond Apr 2012 #37
DesertDiamond Apr 2012 #39
tru Apr 2012 #136
GiveMeFreedom Apr 2012 #38
JoeyT Apr 2012 #95
Diclotican Apr 2012 #40
greendog Apr 2012 #41
FiveGoodMen Apr 2012 #66
greendog Apr 2012 #81
padruig Apr 2012 #42
longship Apr 2012 #44
pokerfan Apr 2012 #74
longship Apr 2012 #79
pokerfan Apr 2012 #80
Sedona Apr 2012 #154
HERVEPA Apr 2012 #43
sinkingfeeling Apr 2012 #54
HERVEPA Apr 2012 #107
SharonAnn Apr 2012 #88
Defectata Apr 2012 #46
Paulie Apr 2012 #83
rox63 Apr 2012 #48
Hepburn Apr 2012 #49
obxhead Apr 2012 #50
hay rick Apr 2012 #84
obxhead Apr 2012 #105
Odin2005 Apr 2012 #51
denem Apr 2012 #69
Odin2005 Apr 2012 #109
RedEarth Apr 2012 #52
Thumper79 Apr 2012 #55
Renew Deal Apr 2012 #56
hauweg Apr 2012 #57
Kadie Apr 2012 #58
eppur_se_muova Apr 2012 #64
LeftishBrit Apr 2012 #65
Loki Apr 2012 #70
primavera Apr 2012 #72
LiberalAndProud Apr 2012 #73
femmocrat Apr 2012 #75
BiggJawn Apr 2012 #90
FailureToCommunicate Apr 2012 #76
elana i am Apr 2012 #82
nahant Apr 2012 #86
saras Apr 2012 #91
Sancho Apr 2012 #104
2Design Apr 2012 #92
Shankapotomus Apr 2012 #98
Auggie Apr 2012 #99
Sancho Apr 2012 #103
caraher Apr 2012 #106
Johnny Rico Apr 2012 #111
OnyxCollie Apr 2012 #114
EverHopeful Apr 2012 #123
CountAllVotes Apr 2012 #112
OrwellwasRight Apr 2012 #146
Major Nikon Apr 2012 #116
Gore1FL Apr 2012 #129
Initech Apr 2012 #117
mwooldri Apr 2012 #118
alfredo Apr 2012 #119
aka-chmeee Apr 2012 #121
Historic NY Apr 2012 #125
caraher Apr 2012 #153
alfredo Apr 2012 #160
Doremus Apr 2012 #126
Devil_Fish Apr 2012 #127
LeftOfSelf-Centered Apr 2012 #130
tru Apr 2012 #132
drmjg Apr 2012 #137
relayerbob Apr 2012 #142
MineralMan Apr 2012 #143
47of74 Apr 2012 #144
OrwellwasRight Apr 2012 #147
Rhiannon12866 Apr 2012 #159
japple Apr 2012 #150
JonLP24 Apr 2012 #151
MichaelMcGuire Apr 2012 #152
diane in sf Apr 2012 #156
rocktivity Apr 2012 #157
alfredo Apr 2012 #161
radhika Apr 2012 #158
alfredo Apr 2012 #162

Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 04:49 PM

1. Amiga 500, 1 MB of RAM, no HD, 2 floppy drives

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Response to jakeXT (Reply #1)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:39 PM

9. Still have mine.

 

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Response to jakeXT (Reply #1)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:03 PM

45. I had the 1000

Bought it the first week it was out, but it wasn't my first computer.

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Response to jakeXT (Reply #1)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 07:59 AM

101. Wow, I had an Amiga too

First computer to multitask. But my first computer was the Vic20, Lil. Couldn't do much with it.

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Response to jakeXT (Reply #1)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 09:19 PM

120. that was my first computer too

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Response to jakeXT (Reply #1)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 01:59 AM

128. At Youtube, look up "Eric Schwartz animations" and "Eric Schwartz art."

He made them all on his Amiga.

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Response to jakeXT (Reply #1)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:34 AM

131. My first one also..

I only had the built in floppy. My best friend couldn't belive you had to boot the OS from a floppy. I had a 1200 too. That one had an external HD and I actually got a CD rom drive for it. Great little machine for its time.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:02 PM

2. The Trash-80 Model 1!

A whopping 4K of RAM and cassette player for data storage!

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:07 PM

3. I've got you whippersnappers beat: Behold the VIC-20.



5 whole Kb RAM!!

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:30 PM

6. You forgot;

The required cassette tape player and TV. This was the only way to get a program into the 'computer.'

The TV was the VIC 30's 'monitor.'

I believe I paid about $100 for this world class computer in about 1985.

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Response to greiner3 (Reply #6)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:33 PM

7. I remember that ever so well.

You had to plug the thing into a TV monitor and hook up the cassette player. And even then it didn't do much, but it seemed like the bee's knees at the time.

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Response to greiner3 (Reply #6)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:17 PM

47. The tape drive wasn't the only way to load programs.

It also had a proprietary cartridge thing that could go in the back. I think that tape was the only way to save any information though.

That was my family's first computer, but I only used it to play video games, so a lot of the details of it were probably lost on me.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:07 PM

34. Yep...that was my 1st one, too. nt

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 01:44 AM

93. That was my first one

but I was a kid. Played games on it. I remember trying to use the 'calculator' on it and giving up because you needed to type out code between the numbers in the equation and it was too much, LOL. An actual calculator was much easier.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 01:49 AM

94. Thnx for posting the picture.

This was my first computer as well. That was back in the day when I spoke BASIC, Logo and Turtle. Hard to believe I taught my 3rd graders very basic BASIC.

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Response to ChazII (Reply #94)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:39 AM

133. Hey, I was on the BASIC standards committee.

 

Back in the day.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:19 PM

149. My first computer class

(required to graduate from high school) was taken on this computer. The class was called DRED CED COMP. It was 6 weeks of "civic and economic literacy," 6 weeks of Driver's Ed, and 6 weeks of "computer literacy," taught on this baby. The only thing I remember from the class was we had to write a "program" that of we did it right, made a face that looked right, then left, then right, then left, etc.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:26 PM

4. My first computer was the Apple IIC




It had 128 kilobytes of memory and ran at 1 megahertz. I also had a 300 BPS Modem.

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Response to Tony_FLADEM (Reply #4)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:38 PM

8. Don't have a photo, but mine was an Apple IIe. n/t

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Response to RebelOne (Reply #8)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:40 PM

10. Apple II+ here. Then C=64. Wife's was a VIC-20. All still work.

 

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Response to RebelOne (Reply #8)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 09:26 PM

77. Me too. I was the first kid in fifth grade to have a computer!

[link:|

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Response to Tony_FLADEM (Reply #4)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:12 PM

148. Mine was an Applee ][ - not +, C, E, just ][

Looked like this, though this one wasn't mine:


It was handy having the two floppy drives - not only did it save swapping discs they made a nice stand for the monitor.

I never had a mouse for my Apple ][. I did have some programs that called for saving to tape.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)


Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 05:42 PM

11. Luxury



Paia 4700 computer. TWO digit hexadecimal display. Cassette tape interface. Keypad for programming. Interface between keyboard and control voltage outputs for synthesizer like this

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Response to CBGLuthier (Reply #11)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:32 PM

68. Man, I thought I knew a lot about synth history, but that one's totally new to me!!

What on earth did it do? Since it was Paia, does that mean you had to build it?!

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Response to harmonicon (Reply #68)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 10:37 AM

108. Yes, had to build it all

I am lucky to live in the city where PAIA was. Bought the whole kit for $800 back in 1978.
The computer acted as an interface between the keyboard and digital to analog control voltage converters. The rest was a modular synth with the usual ADSR envelope generators, VCF, VCO, and amplitude modules.

There were sequencer programs and also a random music program called pink tunes. All at a hobbyist level as you had to enter the hex codes for the programs. It did have a cassette interface for storing the programs and the basic synth functionality was burned into an EPROM, if I remember correctly.

Don't have it anymore sadly but it did work pretty well. Of course the digital revolution came in a few years later and modulars went away for the most part and MIDI changed everything.

John Simonton, founder of PAIA has been gone for about ten years now it seems but the company still exists.

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Response to CBGLuthier (Reply #108)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:12 PM

110. that's pretty incredible, man

I remember that Paia was one of the few companies making analogue stuff when it came back into popularity in the 90's when I was getting into it. I've never been able to afford a modular synth (or I've put priority into other instruments, rather), but my first analogue synth was the semi-modular Korg MS-10. I just didn't realize that there were any digital modules until recently. I think combining CV with digital circuitry is a great thing, and it's kind of too bad that it was around so early and has been ignored for so long.

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Response to CBGLuthier (Reply #11)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 02:59 AM

96. Luxury!



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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:06 PM

12. Sinclari ZX81



Ours had the 16K memory module on the back but if you typed too hard on the crappy membrane keyboard or jostled the machine, it would dump everything in memory and crash. You could load programs into memory from a cassette recorder and plug it into a TV for a display, but it would only display in black & white.

Our next computer was a Commodore 64, which was MUCH nicer in comparison. (My parents still have it, and it still works!)

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Response to Rob H. (Reply #12)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 09:44 PM

22. Me too

A strip of blu-tack/Elmer's tack was compulsory on the expansion box.

Happy days...

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Response to Rob H. (Reply #12)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 02:07 PM

53. I had the American Version ...

The Timex/Sinclair 1000.

I had a Memotech 16K Memory module AND a T/S 1016 16K Memory module. I used both, had to POKE a value to a certain memory location because it wouldn't automatically recognize more than 16K.

I envied my friends with 'real' computers, but the TS1000 was real enough, I could spend happy evenings programming in Sinclair BASIC, and the Flight Simulator (they actually made one) was quite absorbing to play.

Didn't care for the long load times from Cassette tape, and of course you couldn't bump the thing, but it was sweet, in its way.

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Response to Rob H. (Reply #12)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 09:46 PM

78. I loved mine...

The BASIC was very good. I programmed a lot of games. Eventually, I upgraded to one of these:



The Commodore SX-64!

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Response to Unca Jim (Reply #78)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 01:11 PM

113. Does it make me weird

that I actually think the SX-64 looks kinda cool?

Edit: Holy crap, there's a guy who made his own C64 laptop, designed to look as if it actually came out in the 80s (check out giant game cartridge slot on the front left side!). There's video at his site of him testing it out, too.



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Response to Rob H. (Reply #12)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 07:53 AM

100. Me too



Don't you dare BUMP that box.... UGGG

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Response to Rob H. (Reply #12)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 02:32 PM

115. Yup. . .

The Timex/Sinclair 1000.

Managed to reverse-engineer a "real" keyboard for it, and a cassette drive for magnetic memory.

Built an 8088 PC from components after that. . .dual floppies, what a difference!!

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:18 PM

13. bunch of Johnny-come-latelys

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Response to hobbit709 (Reply #13)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 10:21 AM

138. Very impressive!

I read about the Altair in Popular Electronics and lusted after it, but couldn't afford one.

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Response to MannyGoldstein (Reply #138)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 10:35 AM

139. Five minutes of flipping switches on the front panel.

That got you to being able to load the paper tape reader, then it was ready to talk to you in English.

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Response to hobbit709 (Reply #139)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 10:59 AM

141. Paper tape? Wow!

The first micro that I programmed on was a single-board computer with a hex keypad, but no nonvolatile storage. Hex was probably infinitely better than binary, but when the power went off - program all gone.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:27 PM

14. First I used? DEC VAX 11



First I owned? A Kaypro luggable (that never went anywhere because it was too dang heavy.)



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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:29 PM

15. :

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Response to ohiosmith (Reply #15)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 11:58 PM

155. ROF

LMAO

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:32 PM

16. 1960's Hasbro Think-a-tron

&feature=related

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Response to Xipe Totec (Reply #16)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:41 AM

134. Oh wow!

I had one of these in 1962. Little punch cards. I was 8 and thought it was so cool!

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:38 PM

18. Commodore 64

This is not my rig but it's pretty similar


We also had a 300 baud modem and a 10 meg Hard rive. I never had those joysticks though. We did have a 2 color impact printer - the printer ribbon was black on half and red on the other half (divided horizontally) and the printer would move the ribbon up and down to the correct color - mostly for highlighting words in a printout but it had some verrrrrry limited graphics capabilities too....

The first computer game we played was The Pawn - an all text rpg where you had to type in the commands (walk north - <You've come to a tree!> - examine tree <you find....nothing> DAMMIT! <unrecognized command> shit...)

Later we got a second modem and phone line and ran a 2 line BBS with door games and all kinds of fun.

I was a Q-Link member before it became AOL. My son got an Amiga after that and it was quite a bit cooler.

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Response to OriginalGeek (Reply #18)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:13 AM

26. We also had a C-64

My father gave it to me when he got a "real" computer (IBM)

I wasn't a programmer, just used it for writing, or playing "Spelunker". So, I also used those red and black joysticks. They were pretty good and durable. I finally gave the system away to a friend. I suspect he either used it for a while or sold it on ebay. I kept the monitor as my only TV set well into 1990s. It had great color and I've seen them used in video-production studios.

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Response to OriginalGeek (Reply #18)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 11:23 PM

87. I was RonT9 on Quantum-Link

Used that on AOL as well. C64. The hours and hours of typing in programs out of magazines. I hand typed every byte of the hex code for the first word processor and spreadsheet programs I ever used.

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Response to OriginalGeek (Reply #18)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 08:07 AM

102. THIS!!!

Commodore 64

Accept no substitutes...

Seems like everyone had that rig... Two drives, two joysticks, modem, printer maybe.

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Response to OriginalGeek (Reply #18)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 10:46 PM

124. I had a system exactly like that, minus the joystick and monitor.

Actually, I still have it.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 06:42 PM

19. Packard Bell 386sx (I think the sx stood for SEXY)

A whole 386mhz processor with an extra meg of ram for a total of 2 whole mega bytes of RAM, yowlzer!!!. It came with Lotus 1.2.3. software but I loaded windows 3.1 (19 3.5 inch floppies as I recall). This monster could almost run Wolfenstien 3D without frames dropping out..


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Response to denbot (Reply #19)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:41 AM

30. I had one of those 386-25

Mine came with a 20 Mb hard drive instead of a 10. Upgraded it with a math coprocessor. Came with DOS 5.0

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Response to hobbit709 (Reply #30)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 05:40 AM

97. Mine came with a 40mb hard drive, and I think the sx was a math coprocessor.

I am pretty sure the DOS was 5.0 under the Lotus 123. I tried to explain to my kids the whole CD/Game Dir/game run/game.exe thing, but they just rolled their eyes and asked me about my first dinosaur ride..

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Response to denbot (Reply #97)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 10:31 PM

122. not to be a noodge....but

The SX designation meant that the Math CoProcessor was disabled....the DX designation meant that the math co was enabled.

This is what pissed me off about INTEL....why the F)(K would you disable something that is already part of the package....just to segment the market further...

Ok...just realized I'm on a rant now.... I did like DOS 5...i actually did the beta for Novell Dos 5 in 1994 I believe....like that had much of chance of going anywhere...

I love you funny explanation about the dinosaur ride....awesome.


Who would EVER need more than 40 MG on a PC

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 08:00 PM

20. 1986: Dad brought home an Amstrad PC-1512



Two 5 1/4" drives, no hard drive, 512k RAM (later upgraded to 640k)

Lasted till we got a 75mHz Pentium Compac in 1994.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 09:39 PM

21. No

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 10:22 PM

23. Wang PC clone

This bad boy had 64k memory, dual 5.25 floppy drives and CGA!

My first gaming was buying these books that had code in BASICA. I would spend hours plugging in the code to run an ASCII game lol.

But then I figured out to take my ZORK books and turn them into simple games in that BASICA format.

Actually saved up $400 for a VGA card and monitor only to find out my first lesson with PC building, see if the PC will support said upgrade first.



EDIT: Forgot to mention the plus of the 5.25 when a certain hold punch in hand. Double sided 5.25!!!

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Thu Apr 5, 2012, 10:27 PM

24. MOS KIM-1



Stored my programs on paper tape. The 6502 was a hell of a processor back in the day.

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Response to pokerfan (Reply #24)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:47 PM

60. Apparently so.

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Reply #60)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:13 PM

61. The Truth About Bender's Brain

David X. Cohen, of "Futurama," reveals how MOS Technology's 6502 processor ended up in the robot's head

I spent a good percentage of my high school years programming the Apple II Plus in 6502 assembly language, so I have fond memories of long nights alone with this chip. My greatest 6502 achievement was a video game I called Zoid that was played heavily by me and my father and no one else. Incidentally, Zoid incorporated digitized speech (me saying the word Zoid , slowed down to make it mightier), which was pretty rare at the time. The digital audio for that single syllable used much more memory than the entire program. I tried to sell the game to Broderbund Software, but I knew I was in for bad news when the return letter they sent me started with a misspelling of my name.

http://spectrum.ieee.org/semiconductors/processors/the-truth-about-benders-brain

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Response to pokerfan (Reply #61)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:48 PM

63. Thanks! I suspected a personal connection. nt

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Reply #63)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:13 PM

71. Yeah, I couldn't remember the episode so I googled it

But it makes sense as the 6502 was used everywhere those days, from the Apples and Commodores posted in this thread to pretty much every home and arcade video game of the era. It was actually a lot of fun to program. It only had three internal registers but addressed the first 256 bytes of memory in such a way as to essentially serve as registers. Simple and elegant.

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Response to pokerfan (Reply #24)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 11:20 PM

85. Me too!

My introduction to 6502 coding! It was like juggling with one hand.

I was the only one in the theater who laughed when I saw what the "The Terminator" was running.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:56 AM

25. First "modern" computer I built, COSMAC ELF

Similar to this:



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COSMAC_ELF

Most of the parts from that computer went into the second computer I built, which I still have.

Before that I'd built some pretty crazy relay machines. The sound of dozens of relays clicking is like music. It had a phone dial and a bunch of switches for inputs.

Before that I owned a Bell Labs "CARDIAC"



http://boingboing.net/2009/06/03/cardiac-paper-comput-1.html

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:40 AM

27. I don't remember what model it was

I know it ran Win 95.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 03:10 AM

28. My first was an IBM PS2.

I thought I had the shit with a 40 meg hard drive and one meg of ram.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 04:20 AM

29. Wow!

 

Those photos really bring back some memories.We really have come a long way haven't we?

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:39 AM

31. Its was a Atari can't remember the model.

 

But I loved my ZX Spectrum + 2A 128k




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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 09:11 AM

32. Macintosh Performa 475 - I bought mine in 1994, It sold me on Macs from that point on

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 10:07 AM

33. A Pickett slide rule. Still have it, can still solve triangles on it...

If I ever have to take trigonometry again, I'll blow the youngsters away with it!

Actually, I inherited my sister's Atari 800XL with "a blazing 1.79MHz clock speed, and a full 64K memory." Had 2 daisy-chain floppy drives that sounded like Sherman tanks on meth. No programs for it, so I had to learn Atari's version of BASIC and write my own programs; but I did manage to create a pretty nifty database program with it. It's still up in my attic.

First real PC was an AST Premmia 486 with Win 3.1, an awesome 350MB hard drive, modem, and 8MB RAM. Ran it until Win2K came out, and flat wore out the keyboard. Took it apart and put it back together so many times, I could almost do it blindfolded. Ahh, the memories!

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Response to lastlib (Reply #33)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:09 PM

59. I had one of those as well

I think we also used an abacus in the first grade.

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Response to lastlib (Reply #33)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:31 PM

62. Used one in school. Crazy thing actually worked.

Looked something like this and was made out of magnesium or something. It was my grandfathers from back in the 40s or so. Somebody stole it.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #62)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:27 PM

67. Probably aluminum--Magnesium...

...would have serious oxidation problems. Major bummer that it got stolen.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #62)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:45 AM

89. I have an alloy one. It's frozen.

My bamboo "Hemmi" is much nicer.

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Response to BiggJawn (Reply #89)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 10:48 AM

140. I remember using a lot of graphite to keep mine smooth, and the black hands afterwards.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #62)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:44 AM

135. Somebody stole

 

The Smith Corona typewriter my parents gave me when I graduated from high school. It still bums me out.

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Response to Hoyt (Reply #62)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 04:38 PM

145. Still have my husbands slide rule.

Beautiful piece of work. Now---if I only new how to use it.....
Came in a great leather case.
He could zip his calculations in no time. Faster than me on this electronic gizmo.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:16 PM

35. Leading Edge Model D computer in 1994

Before it could be shut off, or moved from one place on the desk to another spot on the desk, the "heads had to be parked".

One day there was a sharp earthquake jolt that made the apartment building jump up momentarily, which made the heads move on the disk, and that computer became unrepairable and never worked ever again.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:30 PM

36. No photo - just a story.

I enlisted in the army in 82 as a Fire Direction Computer (artillery aimer). Our first day in the classroom, our drill instructor's first instructions were to hold up our hands in front of us.

"See those? There's your computers!"

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:31 PM

37. Cool, I love it! I don't remember the brand of my first computer, I just know it make a sound like

a coop full of chickens. "buck, buck, buck, buck, buck, buck buck..." LOL!

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Response to DesertDiamond (Reply #37)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:34 PM

39. I also remember I could never leave it sitting on or whatever text was on the screen would be

permanently burned onto the monitor.

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Response to DesertDiamond (Reply #39)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:45 AM

136. hence the existence of screensavers. n/t

 

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:32 PM

38. My first owned computer



But more important, the first computer game I loved. Played "Wasteland" 20 times or more all the way through. The game was intriguing, in the fact that it was dynamic. The ending was ever changing, depending on the choices I made during game play.

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Response to GiveMeFreedom (Reply #38)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 02:07 AM

95. That was my first game too.

It's what actually got me started on video games.

Can't believe they're finally making a real sequel.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:35 PM

40. LynneSin

LynneSin

I almost was buying one of them - when I bought my first PC.... But I got warned about it becouse the combo... And becouse it was a Compaq... Even in the mid 1990s, Compaq had allready got a reputation they never really was able to go away with...

I had a whole 1.080gb Hardrive (who I was told I was never to be able to fill up) 4mb RAM, later made to 8 and then wopping 32mb RAM... and a impressive 128 grapic card. Later one replaced with an 512 mb grapic card... And yes. I had a impressive Pentium 1 prosessor, who was 100mhz.... The fastest on the marked at that time was an 172mhz prosessor, who I could not afford.. Even tho the PC got to a wopping 15.500 NKR in the end... (That was a LOT of money) And I had WIN95 who was brand new then (a loosely operative system, who often broke down But I learned a lot about Computers then
And after that - I was stuck on the computer... I think I have had 5 or 6 computers since 1996, and even tho the prize have fallen, the computer itself have been far better than I ever could imagine in 1996.. Today I am on a HP with Intel i7, and 8gb ram, and 2gb on the graphic card,..

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:38 PM

41. Banana Junior 6000!!!!

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Response to greendog (Reply #41)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:23 PM

66. Obsolete, but user-friendly

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Response to FiveGoodMen (Reply #66)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 10:16 PM

81. Sometimes not so user friendly.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:46 PM

42. PDP-10



[link:|

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Response to padruig (Reply #42)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:03 PM

44. Oooo! A DEC System-10!!

The computer used to develope the first adventure game (text only).

You're in a maze of twisty little passages, all alike.

I used that machine in the late 70's at Ma Bell. It had 8 Mbytes of core memory, actual tiny magnetic doughnuts strung together with myriads of teeny-tiny wires, all hand made!

Communicated with it using a teletype like terminal at 300 baud!

The first computer I used was a Burroughs B5500, named "Big Bertha". Programmed it in Algol, FORTRAN, etc.

My first computer was Heathkit digital trainer with a Motorola 6800 and 256 bytes of RAM.

I graduated quickly to an Apple II (No! Not the Plus - which we early adopters called the "Minus".)

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Response to longship (Reply #44)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:23 PM

74. We used to play that on the EE department's HP-3000

Many hours wasted. Drawing out the maps on butcher paper, getting stuck in the maze, the words 'xyzzy' and 'plugh'.

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Response to pokerfan (Reply #74)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 09:49 PM

79. Wow! Impressive

I run Linux (exclusively). I bet I can get a copy of the colossal cave. Nethack it ain't, but it would bring back memories.

Plugh, is it pronounced with soft or hard "G", or is it "pluff"? Gotta get it right to get through the cave.

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Response to longship (Reply #79)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 10:12 PM

80. Install the 'bsdgames' package

Then run "adventure" from the terminal



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Response to padruig (Reply #42)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 11:28 PM

154. Yep this looks like the one

American Express Southern Regional Operating Center Ft Lauderdale, FL circa 1980

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 12:58 PM

43. IBM 1620

IBM 1620
1968
Drexel Institute of Technology (now Drexel University)
Note: I am still a Mainframe Programmer

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Response to HERVEPA (Reply #43)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 02:33 PM

54. +10000 I'm still a mainframe programmer as well!

My 'first' was a 1401.

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Response to sinkingfeeling (Reply #54)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 09:24 AM

107. I program in COBOL and IDMS, but

recently had to go modify some FORTRAN programs. Took me back to my roots.

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Response to HERVEPA (Reply #43)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:13 AM

88. GE 415 mainframe. Octal,not hexadecimal. Still have the "Instruction Card" with all

the Basic Assembly Language codes and instruction parameters.

Haven't programmed a mainframe for a long time, though.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:09 PM

46. First was a Texas Instruments TI-99 4/A

followed by an Atari 800XL then an Amiga 1000

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Response to Defectata (Reply #46)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 11:09 PM

83. I still have my TI-99/4a with PE Box

And 480k ram disk, 32k card and speech synthesizer. Play Tunnels of Doom and Parsec occasionally.

Played with lots of toys I've the years. Coolest was probably the Grid laptop with bubble memory. Then the plasma screen compaq luggablea.

Big iron was a pair of 3090-600's and 4381, which hooked into the Vax cluster via a PDP-11.

Got to type on the worn indented Bakelite keyboard of a card punch for a Honeywell DSP7 (which emulated a DSP-2), thing had core memory, as in little iron rings wired together to make the memory. 32k of it. Have a couple of 300 meg disk packs for it in the basement, 12 12" platters went into a drive which looked like a top loading washing machine.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:17 PM

48. One of the original Compaq portable PC's

It did snap together like a suitcase, which made it portable, even though it was fairly heavy. It had a 10 MB hard drive, two floppy drives and a tiny green-on-black built-in monitor.




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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:17 PM

49. This was my dinosaur



Not sure if it was even really a computer at all!

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:22 PM

50. Kaypro 16



Ours had dual 5.25 floppy drives, no hard drive and ran on MS-DOS 2.0. I did a bit of programming in GW basic back then. We also had an add on color 14" monitor.

My cellphone 10 years ago probably had 100 times more power than this PC

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Response to obxhead (Reply #50)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 11:16 PM

84. My first computer was a Kaypro.

It was a 286 and the monitor was separate. I remember the software bundle included Wordstar. My first application was dBase III+.

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Response to hay rick (Reply #84)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 08:23 AM

105. LOL

Yes we had wordstar and dbase as well, forgot about those.

I mostly used it for gaming. I fondly remember Castle Wolfenstein (also came with it) which was a 2d top down view game.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 01:41 PM

51. 1994 Packard Bell with Pentium processor.

8MB RAM
800MB Hard Drive
256-color SVGA graphics with polygon rendering.
Windows 3.1

Cost was $2300.

Top-of-the-line PC at the time.

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Response to Odin2005 (Reply #51)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:37 PM

69. But you could have had a Mac!

I know you love them.

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Response to denem (Reply #69)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 11:47 AM

109. YUCK, they used Macs in my school and they crashed all the time.

I hated them!

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 02:07 PM

52. Amstrad

Banks were giving them away if you bought a 3 year CD. Got it about 1992.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 02:53 PM

55. It was a Hyperion, given to me by my mother


It used the floppy disks and a very small screen. I didn't use it much and have since given it away.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 03:11 PM

56. It was a Packard Bell from Service Merchandise if I remember correctly

Definitely a Packard Bell. Got it around 1990, maybe 1989. It came with Dos any maybe some real early version of Windows. I remember getting Windows 3.1 on it eventually and playing the worm game.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 03:57 PM

57. DAI



Intel 8080A at 2 MHz, 48Kb, Cassette interface
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DAI_Personal_Computer

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 04:18 PM

58. IBM with dual floppie drive. For my husband, IBM 360/91




IBM 360/91





and he says for home use this was the first one he used...




on edit... my husband is having a blast looking at old photos of computers he has worked on. Thanks for the thread.




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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:49 PM

64. PowerBook 170. Still works.



I had to deliberate whether to save money, or buy the "big" hard drive -- 40 vs 80 MB. I upgraded the hard drive 2-3 times, but I think the original still works. Max ram was 8 MB, enough to run Tenon Intersystems' MachTen Unix-style OS virtually. Finally shut it off when the last program I was running on it was released for System 8 only.

This was a "high-end" laptop -- the only faster Mac at the time was the IIci, which used the same 25MHz 68030 CPU. IIRC, it and the PB170 were the first Macs to exceed one MFLOP -- about the same as a Cray-1 supercomputer.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:03 PM

65. My first computer has long been an ex-computer, pining for the fiords; but it looked like this

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Amstrad_PCW512.JPG

An Amstrad PCW512, bought second-hand in 1988, and lasted me till 1997. It used Locoscript, and you had to put the discs in the disc drives each time, for it to function properly. I liked it, though many functions that one would now take for granted, notably re copying and pasting, were quite primitive. It was much more affordable than other computers at that time, even if I'd bought it new.

Ah, those were the days!

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:55 PM

70. My first love, and still my only love

Went out and bought this: Performa operating a 7.5 OS





then became aware that I knew absolutely nothing about a computer so went and bought this:



so now I just introduce myself as:



and dream about the old days:



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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:18 PM

72. Epson QX-10

Ran on CPM-80 from floppy discs.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:20 PM

73. Some clone of some sort.

8088 processor, 20mb hard drive, 8kb memory, dual floppy, amber monochrome monitor

had to buy a math coprocessor for my longish spreadsheets

less than two grand was a STEAL for that cutting edge technology, I tell ya

Edit: and AND a 1200 baud modem

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:36 PM

75. Does anyone remember the Timex Sinclair? (circa 1980)

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Response to femmocrat (Reply #75)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:52 AM

90. I had one.

Guy gave it to me for fixing his lawnmower. Had a cassette drive and a 4Kb memory module to add to the 1K on board RAM.

I wrote a BASIC program that would give you bicycle MPH for a give front/rear sprocket ratio and cadence.
For speeds over 30MPH it would display "You poor bastard!" and under 9 "Hurry up!"...

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 08:56 PM

76. First one I remember was by (the) KRELL



First one I used was my brothers Kaypro:



First one I owned - and used Papert's LOGO on - was a Commodore 64:



(Still have it!)

first really useful computer for me (sure wish now I'd been able to buy stock then!)

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 10:18 PM

82. piece o crap trs80



the only thing it was good for was game cartridges.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 11:23 PM

86. Puters

My first home computer was a Xerox 820 running CPM then a 16-8 running both DOS and CPM. Then a Xerox Star Workstation 8010, then a IBM clone, a Xerox 6085, a Sun Sparc station Aww shit I have had more computers than I can remember and all those were at home and still buying new ones every few years.. Never mind at work....

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 01:19 AM

91. DIALUP WARNING!!! Which "first"?

 

High school: Fortran, COBOL, PL/1 (all in one year. interesting high school, huh? the machine actually belonged to the university and we sent decks of punch cards up there every night)


Tech school: CP/M, North Star Basic, business computing


First job: programming, hacking, and operating. Employment discrimination software in MS Basic, pong in Forth, disassembler in assembler


First successful build: digital/analog monosynth not unlike a Roland Jupiter voice on steroids. 3 DCOs, 3 envelopes, 3 LFOs, a bunch of weird features from Electronotes that no one put in commercial synths. Keyboard, no MIDI, long dead and gone.


First purchased personal computer: IBM PC/XT with WordPerfect, Cakewalk, a 4-in, 4-out MIDI interface I had to write my own driver for (I bought the cheap one, but 4x4s were hard to come by in 1990).


Once I started making music with computers, I stopped staying ahead of the curve. This is being written on a Dell Dimension xps t600r, a medium-good desktop from 2000, running W2K. YouTube works just fine.

The TRS-80 had the best way of crashing I've ever seen. Extended instructions would address all of memory, so loops could tromp all the way through the address space, sometimes nearly instantly, sometimes slowly, hitting all the memory-mapped hardware (screen, disk, cassette). When it looked like the game of Life was eating your screen from the top down, you had a couple seconds max to get the floppy out before the loop hit the floppy disk controller, usually writing garbage to either the directory or the file you last used.

Bad loops were just tiny chunks of code that would copy themselves either higher or lower in memory, often on top of themselves in a self-modifying way. For some reason, software bugs and especially power surges created them often. And the bitmapped screen gave you a bit-by-bit view of them when they passed through video RAM (which was RAM you could run executable code in, way uglier than the game of Life)

Hmm... spontaneously created computer viruses? If one could hit the floppy controller in such a way as to write itself to disk...unlikely but not impossible.

The other common form of crash was the fast one, when a single instruction, capable of moving the entire 64K of memory, would be passed zero (meaning all 64k, not zero, because who wants to move zero bytes with an extended move instruction?) as a size, and would promptly (in milliseconds) move ALL OF MEMORY from some random location to some OTHER random location. Poof! And, because this was a powerful instruction that vastly speeded up the Z80, ROM was full of them and a random jump into BASIC or DOS was liable to hit one in just a few instructions.

Another bizarre TRS-80 feature (perhaps others did it too) was self-modifying ROM code. WTF? you say? ROM code would build, in RAM, jump tables, and then modify them regularly. It would also modify bits of DOS, which it in theory didn't even know was there (or was it that DOS nestled itself closely around bits of code that ROM copied into RAM and then modified before executing?

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Response to saras (Reply #91)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 08:16 AM

104. yea...I first started programming on paper tape and decks of cards...

Fortran, COBOL, and BASIC...I was so thrilled to buy an Apple 2+ and Osborne. And Wordstar was amazing!

I had an office with bookshelves of decks of cards.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 01:41 AM

92. IBM Luggable





The one with the little screen with orange writing http://oldcomputers.net/ibm5155.html

Putting two links in but they are not showing up http://oldcomputers.net/ibm5150.html

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 07:39 AM

98. Mine was a Commodore-64

but not the expensive first model. The cheapo later one you used your tv as a monitor for and a floppy disk drive. Can't find a picture of the keyboard online. We mostly used it to play pong.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 07:51 AM

99. Macintosh IICi

Cost: about $3000.00 in 1990. A fine little machine, but I wish I had invested the money instead. What I've spent on computers and software over my life makes me sick sometimes. I've worked from home over the last 16 years so all the technology expenses are valid. But still ... crap, I hate thinking about it.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 08:10 AM

103. Apple 2+

I think I bought it in 1978.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 09:15 AM

106. TRS-80

First one I owned, anyway... bought it for a sliver under $1000 with money saved from my paper route:



12kB ROM, 16kB RAM, cassette data/program storage. No printer. All the BASIC you cared to program...

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:30 PM

111. Atari 400. 4KB of RAM, "membrane" keyboard, tape drive for memory.

 



But it did play Star Raiders, which was half the reason I bought it...



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Response to Johnny Rico (Reply #111)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 01:37 PM

114. I had one, too!

I used to play Defender on it, via cartridge.

I also had a really cool game called Shamus that required the cassette player to load.

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Response to Johnny Rico (Reply #111)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 10:45 PM

123. This was my first.

But family had Vic 20 and Commodore 64 before. Ah, up all night on the old BBS (how do you pluralize BBS?)--And trying to create lame games in basic.

Got the Atari for the Pac Man--misspent my youth playing Pac Man. Earned my living on mainframes all day and played Pac Man all night. I was also one of the few, the gullible, who actually bought a PC Junior--loved it though.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:38 PM

112. Macintosh SE30



She lasted a long long time. I wrote my master's thesis on this little sucker. I printed said thesis on a little printer (a small inkjet that was made in Japan).

I ended up giving this to my late mother who had not a clue what to do with it.

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Response to CountAllVotes (Reply #112)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 05:02 PM

146. My first computer as well.

Loved it because it actually had a hard drive (external, but still, a hard drive). My nephew's similar machine you had to keep switching out the floppies, the one with the MacWrite program, and the one you were saving your paper on.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 03:10 PM

116. First computer

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Response to Major Nikon (Reply #116)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 02:33 AM

129. That one had the Famous Y0K bug. :) n/t

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 03:46 PM

117. It was an Apple Mac Performa 400 - circa 1992



Right now my new phone is far more powerful than that PC ever was.-

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 06:24 PM

118. First computer I used: BBC Microcomputer.



In socialist Britain, the BBC planned a TV program to introduce people to computers and what they could do. Problem is that the BBC is a non-commercial outfit, so did not want to support a particular brand of computer over another. So they invited companies to submit tender to build a BBC branded computer. Acorn Computers won the bid. The program was a success that follow-up series were made. The BBC microcomputer was rolled out to nearly every school in the UK.

What of the BBC Computer today? Well Acorn developed something called the RISC processor... launched into its Acorn Archimedes and also into Apple Newton's systems. The computers themselves may not have been a stellar success - in fact Acorn as a business name is pretty much dead - but the development of the RISC processor by Acorn (and Apple) meant that this division of Acorn was spun off as a separate company. This spin off, now known as ARM Holdings, design microprocessors that power pretty much every smartphone out there and a whole load of other devices such as cable and satellite tv boxes, sony playstations, flat screen tvs and more.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 07:39 PM

119. Macintosh 7100/80



features a 80 MHz PowerPC 601 processor, 8 MB or 16 MB of RAM, a 250 MB, 500 MB, or 700 MB hard drive, and a 2X CD-ROM drive in a high-profile desktop case.


This was the first I bought for myself. Before I used the university's VAX, Macintosh SE, and an IBM AT at work. I learned a bit of BASIC-V, but after years of therapy, I can reenter society.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 10:14 PM

121. I had (still have) a Quest Super Elf

Made from a kit, with expansion board that had I think 2K of ram. Tiny basic on eprom was an option I didn't pony up for, so all my programming was done in machine code. It had a special video controller chip which presented really coarse display. Programmed it to read morse code, automatically adjusting for speed and show a moving 8 character display on monitor.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 10:49 PM

125. Mac II with a 20mg hard drive...



With all the bells & whistles I paid $2000...got me through my masters and then it was just so slow.

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Response to Historic NY (Reply #125)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 08:30 PM

153. Looks like an original Mac (512 kB RAM?) to me

I got a Mac Plus in '87 and the 20 MB hard disk I later bought seemed incredibly decadent... The Mac II was the first color Mac.

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Response to Historic NY (Reply #125)

Wed Apr 11, 2012, 11:51 AM

160. I used that one at work. I created my first digital drawing on one.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 11:50 PM

126. 8088 like this one but offbrand



5" floppy drive AND 64mg hard drive, monochrome monitor, $3500 in 1986.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 12:52 AM

127. When floppy disks were really flopy! (12" flopy only storage!)

 



This beast was about 100lbs. I think the disk held around 500K. you had your OS in the A drive, and used the B drive to store a file.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 06:08 AM

130. Good old Commodore 64.

I had a Commodore 64 when I was a kid. I don't remember when exactly my parents bought it for me, but it was in the mid 80s. I remember using it with a small Sony TV that I had in my room. Before having my own, I remember playing "Summer Games" on my uncle's C-64.



For a while I had to struggle with the Datassette player (which was utter torture) until I got a 1541 floppy disk drive. The first game I got on disk was "Racing Destruction Set". I remember cutting bits of the floppy's casings in order to make them double sided.



Later I also got an 803 printer.



I had a "The Arcade" joystick, made in the Netherlands (not sure why I remember that detail).



This screen pretty much sums up a part of my childhood, so much so that I named one of my bands "?Syntax Error".

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:35 AM

132. IBM 7044

 

Not photo of the actual machine I used:



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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 08:05 AM

137. IBM 360

Programed in Fortram, not often actually allowed to touch the mainframe.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 02:26 PM

142. Osborne 1 is the first one I owned

World's first portable. CP/M with 64k and two, count 'em, two 60k floppy drives



First computer used PDP-4 size of refrigerator with a massive 4k of RAM and a teletype for data entry !! Long term storage was paper tape.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 02:54 PM

143. Epson Equity I*

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 03:46 PM

144. I had a Tandy 1000 HX

Kind of like this one here;



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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 05:04 PM

147. Does this count?



Cuz, if we are being honest, this really was it!!

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Response to OrwellwasRight (Reply #147)

Mon Apr 9, 2012, 02:24 AM

159. OMG! I'd completely forgotten!

We had one of those and I was completely obsessed with playing it. Obviously, I got pretty good, LOL. I wonder where it is now. I'll have to look for it...

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:26 PM

150. It was a CPT word processor, but had dual diskette drives for

8" floppys (I think that was the size--they were HUGE!!!) It was a wonder for those of us who though IBM correcting selectric was the top of the line. 1981!


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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 07:46 PM

151. One of the original Web TVs

I don't feel like saving a picture than uploading it to a file hosting but that was mine.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Sun Apr 8, 2012, 08:06 PM

152. Atari XE

 

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Mon Apr 9, 2012, 12:05 AM

156. I typeset my first book on a Mac Plus with Pagemaker, a used IIFX (too F**king expensive) was next.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Mon Apr 9, 2012, 12:18 AM

157. Well, here's my recently departed "Mac-enstein"

Last edited Thu Apr 12, 2012, 09:39 PM - Edit history (1)



named so because installing a G4 processor was cheaper than replacing it. Took me twelve years to max it out. Details here.


rocktivity

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Response to rocktivity (Reply #157)

Wed Apr 11, 2012, 11:54 AM

161. That was my second computer. It lasted forever.

My wife still has her first Mac.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Mon Apr 9, 2012, 12:41 AM

158. Macintosh LC - first owned model

Had 4K RAM originally but I boosted it to 8K. Totally awed by the little audio microphone too. As budget permitted, I treated myself to the occasional new typeface font, had to choose whether to get only standard or include BOLD and Italic too. Took a friend to help me install it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_LC

At work, however, I had been using various PC's for a while. Usually they were IBM, as I worked in a mainframe shop at the time.

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Response to LynneSin (Original post)

Wed Apr 11, 2012, 12:01 PM

162. My wife's first computer Rev B iMac in green.

She still uses this one to play PPC games. She has a Mac Mini and an iPad.

This is the Bondi blue, imagine it being green.

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